Accordance Blog
Aug 17, 2012 David Lang

Wouldn't It Be Nice? Slicker Pictures

Many Accordance tools contain images of some kind, which are displayed in the tool as a clickable thumbnail.

In Accordance 8, when you clicked this thumbnail you would get a new tab displaying the image at the full size of the workspace. That was nice, but if you wanted to look at a series of pictures you would have to switch back and forth between the tab containing the tool and the tab containing the picture.

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Sure, you could have detached the picture tab so that it appeared in a separate window, but how many of us thought to do that?

In Accordance 9 we added zones, so when you clicked a picture thumbnail in a tool you would get a new zone displaying the image. Now you could see the tool with all its thumbnails and the picture window side-by-side, but if you had more than a couple zones in the workspace, the picture zone was likely to be very small.

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The ability to magnify the picture zone to fill the workspace comes in very handy in such instances, but then you can no longer see the zone containing the tool and its thumbnails.

Wouldn't it be nice if you could just click a Picture thumbnail and see it at large size, yet in such a way that you can easily get back to the tool containing that picture? And while we're at it, wouldn't it be nice if the thumbnail and picture viewer were given a slick, modern look?

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Hmmmm. It sure would be nice.


 

Jul 12, 2012 David Lang

Using Accordance to Teach a Bible Study, Part 4

In this series of posts, I've been relating how I used Accordance's Slide Show feature to teach a Bible study on the story of Elijah and the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel. I began by creating separate workspace tabs for each passage I wanted to read. Next I added a tab with a map showing the location of Mount Carmel and the political boundaries at the time. Then I showed how to add a series of pictures from the PhotoGuide. In this post, I want to show how I did a broader search to find just the right image.

In addition to showing pictures of Mount Carmel from the PhotoGuide, I wanted an image that would show how Mount Carmel receives more annual rainfall than the surrounding areas of Israel. My point was that Elijah chose a site known for its rainfall and lush vegetation for a showdown between the God of Israel and Baal, the Canaanite god of the storm and fertility. In essence, he was giving Baal a kind of "home field advantage."

Hoping to find some map of annual rainfall in Israel, I opened a Search All tab, selected Caption from the Language pop-up menu, and entered "rainfall." Within seconds, I found several such maps, including this one from the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible.

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Using methods such as these, I was able to assemble a series of helpful visual aids in a matter of minutes. When it came time to teach the Bible study, I simply chose Slide Show from the Window menu and then accessed each "slide" in turn. I'll show how I did that in my next post.


 

Jul 10, 2012 David Lang

Using Accordance to Teach a Bible Study, Part 3

In this series of posts, I've been relating how I used Accordance's Slide Show feature to teach a Bible study on the story of Elijah and the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel. I began by creating separate workspace tabs for each passage I wanted to read. Next I added a tab with a map showing the location of Mount Carmel and the political boundaries at the time. Today I want to show how I added tabs for the various images I wanted to display.

First, I wanted to show photos of Mount Carmel itself. The best place to find location photos is the Bible Lands PhotoGuide, and for me the best way to access the PhotoGuide is by double-clicking a place name on the map. (You can link the PhotoGuide to the Atlas in this way in the Map Tab Display settings of the Preferences.)

As I scanned the PhotoGuide article on Mount Carmel, I found several photos I wanted to show: a view of the summit, a photo of the Mukhraka monastery which commemorates Elijah's showdown there, an area below the summit where the people might have stood, etc. Clicking on one of the thumbnails will open a picture tab containing the full-size picture.

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Picture tabs are usually recycled, which means that if I go back to the PhotoGuide and click a second thumbnail, that same tab will be re-used to display the new picture. Recycling windows avoids a proliferation of unwanted tabs, but when you're preparing a workspace for a slide show, you want a separate tab showing each picture you want to display. You can turn recycling off in any tab by clicking the green recycle icon at the top right. So to open a number of separate Picture tabs, you could click a PhotoGuide thumbnail, disable the recycling of the tab, return to the PhotoGuide, click another thumbnail to open a new picture tab, disable the recycling of that tab, and so on.

Now, you know there's got to be a more streamlined workflow than that, right? Here's the shortcut: simply command-click a picture thumbnail to open it in a picture tab with recycling turned off. That way you can simply command-click multiple thumbnails in the PhotoGuide to open each picture in a separate tab. Using this trick, you can very quickly assemble the picture slides of your slide show. Give it a try.

In my next post, I'll show how I found additional pictures in other resources.