Accordance Blog
Jan 25, 2016 Richard Mansfield

NEW! Fortress Commentary on the Bible

Fortress Commentary Covers with drop shadow These days, any new Bible commentary must find a way to distinguish itself. For those looking at the new Fortress Commentary on the Bible, released today for the Accordance Library, I can happily say that this commentary finds its distinctive place among the many other scholarly treatments of the Bible.

The Fortress Commentary on the Bible, originally published in two volumes in print and comprising around 1750 pages, is written by a broad diversity of scholars from Jewish, Catholic, Protestant and other traditions. Covering the Old Testament, Apocrypha, and New Testament, the Bible is broken up into sense units larger than treatments in traditional multivolume commentaries, and the writers provide information about each passage in answer to the following three questions:

  1. The Text in Its Ancient Context. What did the text probably mean in its original historical and cultural context?

  2. The Text in the Interpretive Tradition. How have centuries of reading and interpreting shaped our understanding of the text?

  3. The Text in Contemporary Discussion. What are the unique challenges and interpretive questions the text addresses for readers and hearers today?

Fortress Commentary screenshot with drop shadow
Click the above image for a full size product illustration

Personally, I appreciate this approach because so many commentaries neglect one or more of these categories. As I’ve stated elsewhere, in recent years those first two questions above have become primary concerns of mine when trying to understand a biblical passage and teach it to others. For my use, I could see turning to the Fortress Commentary first to gain an overview of the above three concerns before moving on to more technical commentaries that may or may not cover the same information.

In addition to covering Ancient Context, Interpretive Tradition, and Contemporary Discussion, the Fortress Commentary offers introduction to sections and books of the Bible as well as a number of articles on understanding and interpreting the Bible in the modern world.

Although originally published in print in two volumes, Accordance users will be glad to know that we have included both in one module. This allows for searching for words and concepts throughout the entire Fortress Commentary at once. Moreover, the Accordance developers have carefully scrutinized the text of the commentary and tagged all content according to one of the following search fields: Reference, Titles, English Content, Scripture, Greek Content, Hebrew Content, Transliteration, Bibliography, Authors, and Page Numbers. This kind of detailed tagging allows the Accordance reader to find the exact information needed quickly and efficiently.

Buy Now 2 Fortress Commentary on the Bible
$110


 

Dec 18, 2015 Richard Mansfield

Why You Should Consider Adding the Ancient Christian Commentary Series to Your Accordance Library

Confession: I used to totally ignore the Early Church’s interpretation of the Bible. I felt that it was pre-critical and not worth paying any attention beyond historical curiosity. I was simply a modernist snob. In the last decade or so, my way of thinking has been changed greatly as I've gained new appreciation for ancient faith and wisdom. Regardless of historical-critical insights, which I still value, I’ve come to appreciate the way the Early Church—those closest to at least the New Testament events—viewed the Bible.

In fact, when I am studying or preparing to preach or teach a passage, as part of my overall process, I first look at two kinds of commentaries before any others. First, I look at background commentaries to try to understand the context and cultural issues associated with the text (I’ll save discussion of this for a later blog post). Second, I look to see how the Early Church interpreted the passage. It doesn’t mean that I have to agree with the interpretation, but I want to see traditional understanding of a passage that is often neglected in modern historical-critical expositions.

ACCS_Gen_1 Years ago, if I wanted to see what the Church Fathers had to say about a biblical text, I had to consult multiple sources, scanning Scripture indexes. That changed with the introduction of editor Thomas C. Oden’s excellent Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture (ACCS). These 29 volumes save me hours of time that would be spent scouring multiple sources, thanks to a cross-denominational team of scholars who have done the patristic research for me. With every passage of the Bible, I find the wisdom and insights of dozens of Early Church writers gathered in one place with sources appropriately cited in case I want to read the original context.

ACCS features the voices of nearly 200 individuals and anonymous documents from the first eight centuries of Christianity. Every source is hyperlinked to a section of “Biographical Sketches & Short Descriptions of Select Anonymous Works” which is helpful in keeping these ancient sources separate. Following the biographicsl sketches is a “Timeline of Writers of the Patristic Period” which helps in understanding the chronological context of the ancient contributors.

ACCS

If you don’t already have the Ancient Christian Commentary Series in your Accordance Library, I strongly urge you to consider adding it not only to your selections of commentaries, but also to your steps in preparation as well.

$308

Buy Now 2


Ancient Doctrine Related to ACCS are two other sources I’ll briefly mention. Ancient Christian Doctrine, which originally published in five volumes, is the most thorough examination of the Nicene Creed I’ve ever seen. To get a look at Ancient Christian Doctrine in Accordance, be certain to read Abram Kielsmeier-Jones’ review, "IVP’s 5-Volume Ancient Christian Doctrine in Accordance" at his website.

$199

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Ancient Devotional Finally, as we are close to the beginning of another new year, we often take the time to renew our commitments to reading the Bible. For 2016, why not do something a little bit different by choosing Ancient Christian Devotional (3 volumes) to incorporate readings from the Bible with ancient wisdom from the Church Fathers. Designed as a weekly devotional rather than one for daily use, Ancient Christian Doctrine uses the readings and cycles of the Revised Common Lectionary with commentary from the Early Church. Meet the New Year with the Church Fathers!

$42.90

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Nov 9, 2015 Richard Mansfield

NEW! Life Application Bible Commentary

LABC Hebrews A Commentary for Everyone

New for the Accordance Library, the 17-volume Life Application Bible Commentary (LABC) is one of the best all-around series for pastors, teachers, and laypersons who are simply interested in understanding or communicating the message of the Bible better. Previous knowledge of the Bible is not required for using the LABC, so it is perfect for the person who simply wants to gain practical understanding of the Scriptures. And pastors and teachers will discover illustrations, quotations, and insightful means for communicating the truths of God’s Word in practical terms to a modern audience.

No knowledge of Hebrew or Greek is required for using the LABC for study, but important original language words are sometimes transliterated in English. The commentary primarily uses modern translations such as the NIV, NRSV, and NLT, but interacts with other translations as well, often explaining why some translations differ from others.

A Commentary for the Layperson

Have you ever read a passage from the Bible only to come away thinking, “I just don’t know what any of that has to do with me!” If you have ever expressed that thought, the Life Application Bible Commentary Series is for you. The LABC bridges the gap of the ancient world to the modern context. Imagine one biblical reference source that provides explanation, background, and application for every verse in the New Testament.

A Commentary for Pastors & Teachers

Teaching a class or preaching a sermon? The Life Application Bible Commentary provides teaching notes and sermon ideas that apply biblical principles to the issues of today. Incorporate charts, diagrams, maps, and quotations from famous figures of history into your presentation slides or handouts. Everything in this series is designed to help you understand the Bible and equip you to communicate it to others.

An Example Passage

Take for example the LABC’s treatment of the uncomfortable subject of God’s discipline in Hebrews 12:1-13. The first section connects this chapter to the previous content of Hebrews by offering a thorough summary of what has come before. Hebrews 12:1 is presented from the NKJV with an explanation of the cultural context that the original hearers would have better understood than a modern audience.

Picking up on the idea of “the race that is set before us,” the writer provides “Three aspects to this ‘race’ […] set before all believers” to make a connection to the modern reader. These aspects are presented in three memorable alliterated points of Preparation, Participation, and Perseverance. Each of these three points includes an explanation that interweaves ancient practice with modern experience.

A callout passage that immediately follows the above is titled “Shedding Weight.” This section contains practical action steps for the modern believer:

To run the race set before us, we must train. Long-distance runners work hard to build endurance and strength. On race day, their clothes are lightweight and their bodies lean.

Since shedding “sin weight” is important to your spiritual run, how can you do it:

  • Choose friends who are also committed to the race. Wrong friends will have values and activities that may deter you from the course. Much of your own weight may result from the crowd you run with. Make wise choices.
  • Drop certain activities. That is, for you at this time these may be a weight. Try dropping them for a while; then check the results. If TV consumes precious time, try doing without it. If shopping is your stress relaxer, try something else.
  • Get help for addictions that disable you. If you have a secret “weight” such as pornography, gambling, or alcohol, admit your need and get help today.

Finally, there’s a quotation from Matthew Henry. And all of this is just for one verse of Hebrews 12!

The Accordance Difference

Accordance users will be glad to know that our developers have carefully analyzed the entire content of the Life Application Bible Commentary and have identified the following categories: Reference, Titles, English Content, Scripture, Transliteration, Translation, Bibliography, Quotations, Quoted Authors, Captions, and Table Titles. Such careful tagging of the text allows you to find the exact content you’re looking for quickly and efficiently.

Life Application Bible Commentary screenshot

 

Buy Now 2 Life Application Commentary (17 volumes)
$199

 


 

Jun 6, 2015 Richard Mansfield

Creating Ad Hoc Outlines in Accordance Mobile

Learn how to easily create on-the-fly outlines in Accordance Mobile.

Since the iPad in this video is in portrait mode, we recommend fullscreen viewing.


 

Apr 20, 2015 David Lang

Don’t Neglect the Classics

 

ClassicBooks

I love everything that’s old—old friends, old tunes, old manners, old books, old wine.

—Goldsmith (From Dictionary of Quotations From Ancient
and Modern, English and Foreign Sources
)

 

New, up-to-date commentaries and reference works are important, but older works still have their place. Here are a few reasons you should add old books to your library (followed by a few newly-released old books you should consider).

  1. When we read the biblical text, we are often quick to connect it to our immediate concerns, to focus too quickly on how it applies to the current news cycle or the latest theological controversy. Classic commentaries do not look at the text through those same lenses, so they can (paradoxically) help us to see the text from a fresh perspective.
  2. Classic commentaries also have the advantage of having been written by scholars and clergy whose works have stood the test of time. The fact that they’re still around is an indication that they contain insights which are timeless.
  3. Older works can also prove to be a rich source of sermon illustrations. Your people may well have repeatedly heard that joke or sappy story that’s circulating via the internet, and your use of it can therefore seem stale and outdated. On the other hand, an illustration that is a century old can (again paradoxically) come across as novel and informative. You want your people saying “Wow, I never knew that!” rather than “Yeah, I've heard that one before.”
  4. Finally, classic works are typically a great bargain. If you’re looking for an inexpensive way to expand your library, don’t neglect the classics.

 


Here are some newly released classics I’m really excited about. These works are being offered with introductory specials through April 27, 2015 (11:59pm EDT).


J. C. Ryle’s Expository Thoughts on the Gospels: A commentary on the gospels by the famous nineteenth century Anglican Bishop, Ryle’s Expository Thoughts were published in seven volumes. Ryle’s aim was to be “plain and pointed,” seizing on “the really leading points of the passage.” It is therefore both succinct and yet deeply devotional.

Ryle-Gospels

Expository Thoughts on the Gospels

List Price $80
Regular Price $39.90

Sale Price $29.90

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A. T. Robertson’s Studies in the Epistle of James: Written by the renowned Baptist scholar who authored Word Pictures in the New Testament and a landmark grammar of New Testament Greek, this commentary demonstrates a depth of grammatical understanding combined with pastoral sensitivity. The commentary offers solid verse-by-verse exposition without getting bogged down in minutia.

Robertson-James

Studies in the Epistle of James

Regular Price $19.90
Sale Price $14.90

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Dictionary of Quotations From Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources: I absolutely love this collection of quotations. The compiler’s aim was to select ancient and modern sayings “that seem to reveal an insight into” and “bear pertinently upon” life, literature, speculation, science, art, religion, and morals. Because of this emphasis on wisdom, I find that this collection of quotes contains far less dross than other collections. It’s packed with proverbs and maxims from various nationalities, like the Cornish proverb, “He who will not be ruled by the rudder must be ruled by the rock.” It contains quotes from ancient Greek and Latin authors in the original language as well as in translation. It includes the insights of church fathers and the pithy sayings of modern (prior to the 20th century) writers, politicians, and philosophers. It’s truly a rich vein to be mined.

Wood-Quotations

Dictionary of Quotations

Regular Price $19.90
Sale Price $14.90

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Clergymen and Doctors: Curious Facts and Character Sketches: Another rich source of illustrations, this book is a collection of anecdotes about medical doctors and clergymen. Naturally, I find the clergy stories the most interesting. There are stories of famous preachers who dealt comically with sleeping listeners, and others who dealt cleverly with reprobate kings. For example, there is the story of a famous French minister who was told by Louis XIV: “Father, when I hear other preachers, I am very well satisfied with them; when I hear you, I am dissatisfied with myself.” That’s a critique any preacher might aspire to!

Clergymen & Doctors

Clergymen and Doctors

Regular Price $9.90
Sale Price $7.90

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Dec 12, 2014 David Lang

Commentaries Go To 11, Part 2

In this series of posts, I’ve been talking about how the newest version of Accordance takes various features and ”turns them up to 11”. My last post discussed how the Info Pane makes it easier to discover which commentaries in your Accordance library actually discuss your current passage. I ended that post by promising to help you arrange your commentaries in the Library to get the most out of the Commentaries section of the Info Pane. Here goes:

How the Info Pane Displays Commentaries: The Info Pane displays your commentaries in the order they appear in your Library, except that it skips any commentaries which do not include a comment on the current verse. For example, let’s say I have an Old Testament commentary like Keil & Delitzsch at the top of my list of commentaries. As long as I am looking at a New Testament verse, Keil & Delitzsch will never appear in the Info Pane. If my first ten commentaries only cover the Old Testament, then my eleventh commentary will be the first to appear in the Info Pane whenever I am studying a New Testament verse.

Recognizing this can help you to arrange your commentaries in such a way that the Info Pane will present you with commentaries you might otherwise overlook. Below is a screenshot of my current system of organization—color-coded so you can see the relationship between the Library and the Info Pane.

OrganizedForInfo

From Narrow to Broad: Prior to the advent of the Info Pane, I tended to organize my commentaries so that those which covered the entire Bible came first, followed by partial or specialized commentaries. The problem with such a broad-to-narrow arrangement is that I never see those partial or specialized commentaries in the Info Pane, since all those complete commentaries appear in the first five, ten, or even fifteen spots. That’s a shame, because we have some really fantastic commentaries which only cover a small portion of the Bible.

For example, Bruce Waltke’s commentary on Genesis has quickly become my favorite commentary on that particular book. Likewise, I love Beale and Carson’s Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament, which only covers a specific set of Old and New Testament passages. Since those commentaries will only appear in the Info Pane when they actually cover my current passage, it makes sense to move them toward the top of the list, ahead of all those commentaries that cover the entire Bible and will therefore always show up.

Using Folders: If you group your commentaries into folders, those folders will not show up in the Info Pane, but they will appear in the Library and as submenus in your Commentaries menu. Since I don’t want to scroll past every partial or specialized commentary to get to my mainstays, I created a folder named “Specialized/Partial” to contain them all. I then put that folder near the top of my commentaries for the reasons mentioned above. After that I have other folders grouping my more complete commentaries by type. A folder named “Expository” contains all those commentaries that give you a basic sense of a passage’s meaning without getting bogged down in too many technical discussions. Below that are my “Technical” commentaries: those thick-volumed sets that dig into every jot and tittle of the text. Further down the list I have “Background” commentaries, “Application” commentaries, “Patristic” and “Classic” commentaries, etc. These categories helps me find the commentaries that best suit my purpose at any given time.

Mixing Things Up: There’s one major downside to the way I’ve grouped my commentaries into these categories. In each category, I have a few favorite commentaries, followed by commentaries I don’t use as often. I might do better to add a Favorites folder to contain my favorites from each category. That way, the Info Pane might present me with a better mix of Expository, Technical, and Classic commentaries.

Starting With a Summary: When I’m studying a passage, I try to put off turning to commentaries as long as possible. It’s too easy to begin reading a passage through the lens of a commentary, so I try to wrestle with the passage on my own before consulting one. When I do turn to commentaries, I tend to look for as little help as possible, so I’ll begin with the more general “Expository” commentaries. Only when I am really struggling with an interpretive question will I delve into my more “Technical” commentaries. Because I like to get as little help as possible, I’ve placed Fee and Stuart’s How To Read the Bible Book by Book at the very top of my commentary list. It’s a helpful reader’s guide which gives a brief overview of each passage with hints of literary features to watch for. I often find that is all the help I need. If you don’t have that, you might consider starting with a Bible Handbook or a good set of Study Bible notes.

Speaking of Study Bibles: Study Bibles are basically super-concise commentaries, but they are now automatically placed in a separate Study Bibles folder in the Library. Nevertheless, they will show up in the Info Pane if you display enough commentaries. For me, I have to show about 35 book covers before the first Study Bible will appear. Of course, I could always move a few favorite Study Bibles up so they show up in the Info Pane sooner. I could either move them into the Commentaries folder somewhere, or I could create a Favorites folder that grouped my favorite commentaries and study Bibles together. The new Library gives you that level of flexibility, and the Info Pane offers a strong incentive to prioritize your favorite resources.

Personally, I’m still experimenting with how to organize my commentaries in order to get the most out of the Info Pane. I hope you find some of these suggestions helpful in developing your own system. By optimizing the way commentaries appear in the Info Pane, you can turn your commentaries “up to 11” and experience Bible study that really rocks.


 

Dec 10, 2014 David Lang

Commentaries Go to 11

In this series of posts, I’ve been talking about how the newest version of Accordance takes features like the Library and triple-clicking and ”turns them up to 11”. In today’s post, I want to focus on how commentaries now “go to 11.” I also want to offer some tips for how to organize your commentaries to get that “extra push over the cliff.”

Accordance has long enabled you to view commentaries in parallel panes that scroll alongside the Bible, or to open them in separate tool tabs to browse and search them. Unfortunately, short of doing a global search for a verse reference, there was no way to tell which commentaries actually included a comment on your passage of study. You therefore always ran the risk of opening a commentary that wasn’t relevant to your current study.

Accordance 11 has now introduced the Info Pane to solve that problem. The Info Pane acts as a clearing-house of information about your passage. To open it, simply select Info Pane from the Add Parallel pop-up menu.

InfoPaneMenu

The first section of the Info Pane shows you the covers of the first five (or more, depending on your settings) commentaries which contain a comment on the verse at the top of the window. As you scroll through the text, the information in the Info Pane will update to reflect the current verse.

InfoPane

Previewing and Opening Commentaries: If you hover your mouse over one of the commentary book covers, you’ll see a preview of the comment in the Instant Details box. That way, you can quickly skim through your commentaries to see which are most helpful. Once you find one you want to explore further, simply click the book cover to open that commentary in a parallel pane. Hold down the shift key while clicking a cover to force the commentary to open in a vertical pane, or hold down the command key (on Mac) or Ctrl key (on Windows) to open the commentary in a separate tool tab.

Customizing the Info Pane: You can customize how your commentaries appear in the Info Pane by selecting Set Info Pane Display from the Gear menu.

InfoPaneSettings

In the dialog that opens, you can set the size of the covers and text, hide the covers altogether, and specify how many commentaries you want to appear when you first open the Info Pane. Once you’ve made your changes, be sure to click the Use As Default button to make the changes permanent.

Organizing Your Commentaries for Best Results: This is where I’m going to show you how to get that “extra push over the cliff” I promised. Unfortunately, this post is already getting long, so it will have to wait. In my next post, I’ll give you advice for how you can arrange your commentaries in the Library to get the most out of the Commentaries section of the Info Pane. Stay tuned…


 

Sep 24, 2013 Darin Allen

Sale on NICOT and NICNT

NICOTset

I’m a huge fan of Bible commentaries, which is why this week’s sale on the New International Commentary on the Old Testament and New International Commentary on the New Testament is so exciting. While I use various commentaries for different purposes, NICOT and NICNT are probably the commentary sets that I use most often in Accordance. There are many reasons why this has become my go-to commentary series, so I thought I’d share some of them.

1) Thorough Interpretive Discussion

Many passages in the Bible have a variety interpretive theories espoused by scholars and pastors. Sometimes these interpretations are connected to denominational differences, but not always. NICOT and NICNT do a good job of addressing the most popular interpretive theories (and some uncommon ones) and then move on to explain which interpretation the author believes to be correct. It’s nice to have all these interpretive theories discussed in a single commentary, even if they don’t all line up with the author’s personal theological beliefs.

2) Excellent Writing

The depth and thorough discussion that I mention above is only a good thing if the writing is excellent, otherwise reading the commentary will feel like a chore. Thankfully, the NICOT and NICNT volumes are consistently well-written. The style is not overly technical and the authors address relevant issues without dragging out the conversation longer than necessary.

3) Insights for Preaching and Teaching

I haven’t been actively preaching this past year, but when I was I would often consult NICOT and NICNT to find illuminating teaching points. Almost always, I was able to find an illustrative example or historical fact that made my sermon more interesting. On another note, I tend to consult commentaries after some personal exegesis and study, and this series has often been helpful in confirming, refining, or refuting my initial conclusions. While it can be frustrating to have a commentary point out the flaws in your initial interpretation, your congregation will benefit greatly from hearing the edited version of your sermon.

4) Strong Scholarship for Exegetical Papers

NICOT and NICNT volumes are chock-full of exegetical insights, background information, and bibliographic footnotes. I used this series for many exegetical papers in seminary, and the papers were better for it. This series also addresses issues found in the original languages, and all Greek and Hebrew words are transliterated for accessibility.

5) Inspiring for Personal Growth

This one is a little more intangible, and will likely depend on your personal theology. For me, I like to consult NICOT and NICNT when I want to dive deeply into a few key verses. You'll probably be better off with a study Bible if you need to cover a large number of verses, but I’ve walked away from many study sessions with NICOT and NICNT feeling spiritually encouraged. For reference, my theological background is non-denominational/evangelical, and I can only speak for myself in this regard.

 

NICNT Set

 

To illustrate some of these points, I’d like to include a section I was recently studying from NICNT on Matthew 19:24. For background, I’ve heard multiple times from friends and pastors that when Jesus says “it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God” that he was really referring to an ancient gate. Supposedly, the gate was so small that a camel could only pass through on its knees. In this interpretation, Jesus would be making the point that rich people can only enter the kingdom of God if they get on their knees and humble themselves before God. Here is what R.T. France's volume on Matthew has to say about this theory.

...More widely adopted has been a suggestion popularized in the nineteenth century that “the eye of the needle” was a name for a small gate within the large double gate of a city wall, through which pedestrians could enter without the need for the large gates to be opened as they would be for a camel train. It is suggested that a camel might be forced through such a gate with great difficulty, and further spiritual lessons have then been extracted from the observation that in order to do so it would have to bend its knees and be stripped of its load. This romantic speculation has been so often repeated that it is sometimes treated as an established exegesis. Unfortunately, while this suggestion was not new in the nineteenth century, there is in fact no evidence at all for such usage of “the eye of the needle” either in non-biblical sources or in ancient commentaries on the gospels. Even if there were, such a scenario would be quite out of keeping with what the context requires: v. 23 spoke of difficulty, but v. 24 goes further and speaks of impossibility, as vv. 25–26 will confirm.

If you are interested in owning these fantastic commentary sets for yourself, there has never been a better time to purchase them in Accordance. For the next week, we are offering our lowest price ever on the New International Commentary on the Old Testament and the New International Commentary on the New Testament. We even have a special bundle price for those who want to buy these sets together. Please note that these sale prices expire September 30, 2013 at 11:59 pm EDT and cannot be combined with other discounts.

EDIT February 2015: the sets and prices below are no longer applicable. See the updated blog post.

NICOT 23-Volume Set

NICOT-Gen-cover

Regular Price: $699.99
Sale Price: $449.99
You save 35%!

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NICNT 20-Volume Set

NICNT-Acts-cover

Regular Price: $599.99
Sale Price: $389.99
You save 35%!

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NICOT/NICNT Bundle

a-bundle

Regular Price: $1,299.98
Sale Price: $779.99
You save 40%!

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Feb 1, 2013 David Lang

EBC Revised Now Complete

EBC R When it rains it pours. The past couple weeks I have been doing my best to keep up with a flood of new Accordance modules which have come to me for final checks. Be looking for lots of new goodies to appear very soon. In the meantime, you can enjoy one of these new releases today: the Revised Edition of Expositor's Bible Commentary is now complete.

We released the New Testament volumes of the Revised EBC last October, with a promise to release the Old Testament volumes "in a few more weeks." As weeks stretched into months, we've received more and more "When?" questions via phone, email, and forums. If you've ever wondered why we are usually so reluctant to forecast release dates, now you know: it's just too easy for those dates to slip, and we are unwilling to sacrifice quality just for the sake of meeting a deadline.

On the other hand, I'm personally encouraged that we received so many requests for the release of the Old Testament volumes. It shows that many of you are preaching and teaching portions of the Hebrew Bible, rather than neglecting it in favor of the New Testament. Those of you who are should be very pleased with the addition of these new volumes, while those of you who are currently focused on the New Testament will also benefit from this update, which now includes extensive hyperlinking to other Accordance resources.

All in all, those of you who have already purchased the Revised EBC will find that your patience has been rewarded with an excellent commentary in a super-convenient form. Just choose Check for Content Updates… from the Accordance menu to download the completed commentary.

As for those of you who haven't yet picked up the new EBC, what are you waiting for?


 

Oct 1, 2012 David Lang

Baker Exegetical Commentary Now Available

BECNT-Matt-sm I'm pleased to announce that the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (BECNT) is now available as an Accordance module. BECNT has long been one of our most requested commentary series, and it's no wonder. Bestcommentaries.com ranks more than half the volumes in this series among the top three commentaries on their respective books of the Bible, and most of the other volumes rank in the top ten. For more about the series and its individual volumes, see this detailed article.

The BECNT is available now for $699.99.