Accordance Blog

January 2013

That's Interesting! Now Where Is It?

January 25, 2013 - David Lang — Last week I wrote a series of posts designed to teach you powerful original language search techniques. In the final post of that series, we did a search for any inflected form spelled epsilon-iota-sigma (regardless of its breathing mark and accent), finding two inflections of the lexical form εἷς, along with three inflections of the preposition εἰς. This screenshot shows both the Search tab and the Analysis which we customized to list the inflected forms beneath each lexical form. The unusual thing about this search result is ...

Become a Searching εἰς, Part 5

January 18, 2013 - David Lang — In this series of posts, we've been exploring some of the 'ace' techniques you can use to define very precise original language searches. Here's what we've learned so far: Part 1: To search for a Greek lexical form, simply enter the word and hit return. To keep things simple and minimize mistakes, Accordance ignores breathing marks, accents, vowel points, and case—even if you happen to enter them. Part 2: To make sure Accordance uses breathing marks, accents, etc. to distinguish one lexical form from another with the same ...

Become a Searching εἰς, Part 4

January 17, 2013 - David Lang — In yesterday's post, we did a search for the lexical form εἷς and showed the various inflected forms that were found. We explained that when you search for a Greek word, Accordance assumes you are entering the lexical form of that word and that you want to find every occurrence of that word no matter how it happens to be inflected. We saw that clearly when we customized the Analysis to list all the inflected forms beneath each lexical form: Here we see that the lexical form εἷς occurs 345 times in a variety of forms. We also see ...

Become a Searching εἰς, Part 3

January 16, 2013 - David Lang — In my last couple of posts, I've been showing you how to become a searching 'ace' by searching for the Greek word εἰς. You see, there is another Greek word spelled exactly like εἰς except for the breathing mark and accent: εἷς. As I explained in the first post in this series, Accordance ignores breathing marks, accents, vowel points, and case even if you happen to enter them in your search. We do this to spare you having to get all those things right in order to do a basic search, but what if you want Accordance to pay attention to those ...

Become a Searching εἰς, Part 2

January 11, 2013 - David Lang — In yesterday's post, I wrote that if you know how to search for εἰς, you're well on your way to being a searching "ace." It was an admittedly nerdy pun, since the Greek word εἰς is pronounced like the English word "ace." I'm feeling a little less nerdy today, however, since someone made the even nerdier observation that my pun only works for the artificial Erasmian pronunciation scheme as opposed to other systems! Whether or not my joke works in your preferred system of Greek pronunciation, my point is that searching for εἰς offers a ...

Become a Searching εἰς

January 10, 2013 - David Lang — Εἰς in the title of this post is a Greek preposition which is pronounced like the English word ACE. It's an admittedly nerdy joke, but searching for εἰς helps to illustrate several important aspects of original language searching in Accordance. In other words, if you know how to search for εἰς, you're well on your way to being a searching "ace." So if you have a tagged Greek New Testament text, open it up, select Words from the Words/Verses token, and type the letters "e, i, s." When you're finished, hit return to perform the search. ...

Learn More About Accordance for iOS 1.6

January 09, 2013 - David Lang — Just before the start of the new year, Accordance for iOS 1.6 went live in the app store. This new version features a host of interface improvements and feature enhancements. Be sure to check out Dr. J's excellent video introduction below, and if you haven't yet updated to this latest version of our mobile app, what are you waiting for?

TIP: See Where You Are In A Tool

January 01, 2013 - David Lang — When searching an Accordance Tool module, you may get results which are buried deep within a long article. When that happens, how can you see the wider context of where you are in the tool? For example, let's say I search the Titles field of the Holman Bible Dictionary for the word "judges." Here's the first result I get: This is obviously a subarticle within a much larger article, but how can I find out which one? I could obviously scroll back until I got to the beginning of the article, but if it's a very long article, ...