Accordance Blog

November 2010

"Trusted by Scholars" Is More Than a Slogan

November 29, 2010 - David Lang — On every page of the Accordance web-site, you'll see the slogan "Designed for Mac. Trusted by Scholars. Right for You." As anyone who visited our booth at the recent annual meetings of the Evangelical Theological Society (ETS) and Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) can attest, our claim to be "Trusted by Scholars" is anything but marketing hype. For years now, the Accordance booth at ETS and SBL has been a hotbed of activity. In fact, we now have other exhibitors telling us they request booth space near us because they know we'll draw ...

Giving Thanks

November 25, 2010 - David Lang — Happy Thanksgiving! On this day when we give thanks for our many blessings, here are a few Accordance-related things I'm thankful for: I'm thankful to work for a company that is dedicated to helping everyone from top scholars to "the rest of us" study the Bible more effectively. I'm thankful that we've built a reputation for excellence in product development, customer support, and publisher relations. We've done it by consistently over-delivering on our promises. I'm thankful that I get to work with folks who feel more like ...

My, What Big Thumbnails You Have!

November 11, 2010 - David Lang — In the past few posts, I've been describing a bunch of new Accordance tools from Zondervan and Carta, all of which are heavily illustrated. As I'm sure most of you know, the images in an Accordance tool module are displayed as a thumbnail which you can click to see the full-sized image. What you may not know is that you can adjust the size of these thumbnails in the Preferences. Personally, I prefer the largest thumbnail size, because I can make out most of the image's details without having to click to enlarge it. Unfortunately, Accordance ...

Why Doesn't the Scapegoat Get to 'Scape?

November 09, 2010 - David Lang — We all know what a "scapegoat" is: it's someone who takes the blame—willingly or not—for someone else's wrongdoing. Yet few people realize that the term "scapegoat" comes from the Bible. Search the King James Bible for scapegoat and you'll find the following practice described in Leviticus 16: And Aaron shall cast lots upon the two goats; one lot for the LORD, and the other lot for the scapegoat. And Aaron shall bring the goat upon which the LORD’S lot fell, and offer him for a sin offering. But the goat, on which the lot fell to be the ...

It's in the Bible, so I Guess It's Important

November 08, 2010 - David Lang — Anyone who has ever tried to read through the entire Bible has inevitably found it to be an uneven experience. Some portions, like the Old Testament narratives or the Gospels and Acts are engaging, easy to read, and thoroughly entertaining. Other portions, like the New Testament epistles, Psalms, and Proverbs, are rich in theological discussion, inspirational poetry, and practical wisdom. But then there are those portions which are difficult to read and hard to get excited about: the genealogies in Genesis and Chronicles, the intricate plans ...

From Accordance to Accordance: The Sacred Bridge Comes Full Circle

November 05, 2010 - David Lang — Yesterday we announced the release of thirteen new Atlases and books of historical geography from Carta. The centerpiece of that collection is without doubt The Sacred Bridge: Carta’s Atlas of the Biblical World. Flip through a few pages of the print version and it immediately becomes apparent that The Sacred Bridge is like no other Bible Atlas ever produced. Most Bible Atlases are aimed at the every-day student of the Bible who merely wants some basic background information. They tend to be long on colorful images and maps but ...

The Carta Collection: Better to See Once Than to Hear 100 Times

November 04, 2010 - David Lang — When former American president Ronald Reagan visited Moscow at the close of the Cold War, Mikhail Gorbachev greeted him with the words of a Russian proverb: "It is better to see once than to hear 100 times." In the Bible, we hear repeatedly about people, places, and practices which are foreign and unfamiliar to us. The Bible may describe the course of a battle by mentioning a few place names, but unless we are familiar with the terrain we cannot understand who held the high ground or whether the attack consisted of a frontal assault or ...