Accordance Blog
May 30, 2016 Richard Mansfield

NEW! Goldingay's The Old Testament for Everyone

Daily readings of the Bible have a long history in Jewish and Christian traditions. We even facilitate daily readings in Accordance if you want to practice this discipline digitally. Many daily reading plans of the Bible seek to have the reader complete the Scriptures in a year, and some aim for an even shorter time period. I sometimes wonder, “What’s the rush?”

Of course, there’s a difference between reading the Bible and studying the Bible. The latter takes a bit more effort and goes at a slower pace. Few will have the time to study (let alone reflect and act on) the entire Bible in a year. In the 1950s, William Barclay released a series of New Testament commentaries aimed at the “ordinary reader.” Although the series was titled The Daily Study Bible, it was not a study Bible in the sense of what we think of today. It was not a thick Bible with commentary at the bottom of the page. Rather, it would become 17 volumes of Barclay’s own translation and commentary of the New Testament, divided into short enough segments so that each could be studied in one sitting. Barclay’s work is known for its accessibility through explanation of key original language words and memorable stories and illustrations. This series is available in Accordance as The New Daily Study Bible.

OT for Everyone - JeremiahAlthough N. T. Wright never mentions Barclay or The New Daily Study Bible in his series, The New Testament for Everyone, when I saw it, reminded me immediately of the pattern: Wright’s own translation and commentary, broken into short segments, with explanations and stories aimed at the “average” modern reader. Having had the two previously mentioned series in Accordance for some time, today we are releasing the companion to Wright’s series with John Goldingay’s The Old Testament for Everyone.

Next Sunday, I am teaching on verses from 1 Samuel 1 at my church, so I was naturally interested in what Goldingay had to say about the passage in The Old Testament for Everyone. I should point out that Goldingay breaks ch. 1 into five separate readings. Remember what I said about going at a slower pace when studying the Bible as opposed to just reading it? Five days in 1 Samuel 1 is a healthy pace in my opinion.

Goldingay's Old Testament for Everyone screenshot

Click/tap the image above for a larger view of The Old Testament for Everyone.

Goldingay’s approach to Hannah’s anguish (which Goldingay described as “fretful in the sense of offended and angry”) was one that attempts to offer more empathy than either her husband Elkanah or high priest Eli gave her. Goldingay is both personal and contemporary in his approach. Of Elkanah, he comments,

So Elkanah finds himself living with permanent tension in the household and with deep depression in the soul of the woman he loved first and best. The poor man does his best to handle the situation, but we guys are clueless about understanding women. “Am I not better to you than ten sons?” Actually, Elkanah, no. Don’t apply a Band-Aid to the wound. Get her to talk about it some more.

And after Eli realizes that Hannah’s prayer at the Tabernacle is not the result of having had one too many, he knows that he has to respond to her "pastorally." Goldingay writes,

Eli desperately tries to regroup and remember what they told him in seminary about dealing with distraught and angry women, and he manages to get his act together. Various stories in the Old Testament illustrate the dynamics of prayer in this connection, and this is an example. As the word pleading suggests, when the Old Testament refers to prayer it doesn’t have in mind something like meditation or reflection, something designed to change us. Prayer is something more like the relationship of a child to its father or mother. When a child is hurt or scared, it comes to its parents to get them to do something about it, and (hopefully) they assure the child that they will. Eli knows that his job as a pastor in this connection is to bring God’s response to Hannah’s prayer.

I appreciated Goldingay’s wording above. Obviously, Eli didn’t go to seminary as in the modern sense, but using dry humor, Goldingay is making connections for the reader between the ancient world and the modern.

Each section of The Old Testament for Everyone can be studied in one sitting. The translation is Goldingay’s own. He uses the context of the commentary “to stick closer to the Hebrew than modern translations often do when they are designed for reading in church” (Genesis 1-16, “Acknowledgements”). This translation method includes using Yahweh for the divine name instead of the traditional “Lord.” This name--along with other significant words such as peace, Israel, Philistines, covenant, and many more--are hyperlinked throughout the commentary. These hyperlinks connect the reader to more detailed explanations that can be viewed easily in Instant Details or by clicking and going to that point of the text.

NOTE: Currently, the Accordance edition of The Old Testament for Everyone contains 15 volumes but lacks Lamentations-Ezekiel (vol. 16) and Daniel-Malachi (vol. 17). However, we expect to add them within three months at no additional charge, and these final installments will complete the set.

Why not begin in Genesis now (you’ll have plenty of time before getting to Lamentations!) and study your way through the Bible as opposed to simply reading through it. Studying the Bible will take you longer, but the benefits will be greater, too. Afterwards, you can transition right into N. T. Wright’s New Testament for Everyone!

Buy Now 2 The Old Testament for Everyone (17 volumes)
Regular Price $199; Sale Price $119

 

The Introductory Special is good through June 6, 2016 (11:59 pm EDT) and cannot be combined with any other discounts.


 

Apr 18, 2016 Richard Mansfield

The Power of Accordance Mobile with iOS Split View

Presentation iOS Split View

Our release of Accordance Mobile 2.3 in February was a major update that took full advantage of new iOS 9 features. One of the major updates we featured was iOS Split View that allows Accordance to run side-by-side with another app on the devices that can support this.*

Split View In February, I showed off a screenshot of Accordance Mobile on the left and the Mellel word processor on the right. In Mellel, I displayed a paper I wrote years ago for a class (click or tap the image to the right to see a larger view) as a kind of "proof of concept" for how a a user might employ Split View. Using Accordance in Split View with word processing programs such as Mellel and Microsoft Word or note-taking apps like Evernote and Apple’s Notes seemed like a natural combination. And of course, it is.

Just recently, Clay Norwood, pastor of Superior Avenue Baptist Church in Bogalusa, Louisiana, told me of how he uses Accordance and Evernote in Split View for his sermon preparation:

I have really enjoyed doing my commentary work in Accordance using the new split screen feature.  It is great having the Scripture text and a commentary open alongside of Evernote.  Sections of the commentary that might be useful in outlining or drafting a sermon are easily copied and pasted into Evernote.  The iPad Pro (12.9") provides ample screen space for both Accordance and Evernote.

Norwood's Split View

Click/tap the image above for a larger view of
Clay Norwood's sermon prep in Split View.

Regular readers of the Accordance Blog know that those of us who work for Accordance, perhaps more importantly, are users of Accordance ourselves. In recent weeks, I’ve discovered a couple of other ways that Accordance Mobile can be used in Split View, which I’d like to share with you.

I’ve been using Keynote on an iPad to teach an adult Bible study at my church since 2010. I use Lifeway’s Explore the Bible curriculum and prepare slides each week with content combined from their leader materials and my own study of the passage in Accordance. Keynote has been my teaching tool of choice because, until recently, it was the only presentation tool I could find on the iPad that had a true Presenter View that displayed both the current slide and my teaching notes while projecting the slide alone on the external screen. Last year, Microsoft released PowerPoint for the iPad that also has a Presenter View.

Once Accordance worked in iOS 9’s Split View, I had a thought: What if I could put Accordance in Split View with Keynote? That way I could have access to the biblical text, my personal notes that I’ve added to Accordance, and the Presenter View in Keynote. At first, I had difficulty getting it to work. Although I could get Accordance on the left and Keynote on the right in Split View, I couldn’t get Keynote to project to the screen by itself. Then I decided to switch the side each app was displayed. Voila! It worked once Keynote was on the left. Although I would prefer Accordance to be on the left, Keynote would only project if it was in what iOS considers the primary application pane—the one that is on the left side.

PowerPoint - Accordance Mobile split view

Click/tap the image above for a larger view of
PowerPoint and Accordance Mobile in Split View.

I decided to see if PowerPoint would do this, too. So, I exported my Keynote file to PowerPoint and it worked like a charm. I also discovered that PowerPoint has a much nicer Presenter View (PowerPoint is shown in the images in this blog post). I hope that Apple will update the Presenter View in Keynote; but if not, I may have to give PowerPoint another try after abandoning it well over a decade ago.

All pastors and teachers should take note of this. This kind of split screen functionality for presentation software is something I cannot replicate on a traditional laptop because going into presentation mode in either Keynote or PowerPoint takes over the entire screen. I can only do this on my iPad. In Keynote or PowerPoint, a pastor could have a sermon text or outline in presenter notes adjacent to the current slide while using Accordance to display a biblical text plus a parallel text, personal notes, or commentary--all on one iPad screen. Classroom teachers could make use of this kind of setup as well.

Speaking of teaching Bible studies, it’s rare that I get to sit in on someone else lead a study, but I so greatly enjoy doing so when I get the chance. A few weeks ago, we were visiting family back home, and I decided to sit in on an old friend’s Bible study class. To my surprise, he was also using Lifeway’s Explore the Bible curriculum. Since I already had all the lessons in PDF format on my iPad in GoodReader, I simply put Accordance on one side of the screen, and the Sunday School lesson on the other side. I was even able to use my Apple Pencil to take a few handwritten notes on the lesson PDF.

Accordance Mobile - EtB Lesson

Click/tap the image above for a larger view of 
Accordance Mobile and the Bible study lesson in Split View.

This was a bit of a revelation, too. If I were regularly taking part in a class like this, Split View really creates an ideal learning experience. Although the number of iPad models that can support Split View are limited at the moment,* I assume every new iPad released in the future will support it. What a great way for participants in a learning setting to make use of both Accordance and third party curriculum!

What about you? Have you discovered new ways to use Accordance thanks to Split View or other new features in iOS 9? If so, feel free to share them in the comments, or email me at [email protected] along with a screenshot, and perhaps I will feature your idea in a future blog post.


*Note: Currently, Split View is only available on iPad Pro, iPad Air 2, and iPad Mini 4.


 

Feb 1, 2016 Richard Mansfield

NEW! IVP Old Testament & New Testament Essentials

What’s the Bible about? That’s a good question, but I have a hunch that many people—perhaps even many participating in regular worship communities each week—might have trouble answering it. Many know individual Bible stories or often-quoted passages, but how does it all tie together? Fortunately, two new resources for the Accordance Library have arrived to help Bible readers not only gain an overview of the entire biblical story, but also piece it all together into a unified whole.

IVP OT NT Essentials Covers w/drop shadow This week, we are pleased to announce the release of Old Testament Essentials: Creation, Conquest, Exile and Return by Tremper Longman and New Testament Essentials: Father, Son, Spirit and Kingdom by Robbie Fox Castleman. Together, these two volumes deliver a total of 29 in-depth and interactive Bible surveys that can be studied individually or in small groups.

In the introduction to Old Testament Essentials, Tremper Longman immediately addresses a problem that he’s observed numerous times: the Old Testament is often very foreign—and as a result, neglected—by many Bible readers who are more comfortable sticking with the New Testament. This realization led him to create three goals for Old Testament Essentials: “(1) to acquaint you with the message of the Old Testament, (2) to show you how the Old Testament points to Jesus, and (3) to show you how the Old Testament is relevant to your life” (p. 9).

IVP OT Essentials screenshotTap or click the image above for a larger view of
Longmans's Old Testament Essentials.

Castleman’s New Testament Essentials, like Longman’s Old Testament companion volume, is more than mere survey of the New Testament. It is also a thematic study that demonstrates how the component parts of the New Testament, written by multiple authors, fit together. Throughout each of the 12 studies, the reader will find interaction with the New Testament’s Christocentric emphasis as well as continued examples of how God has revealed himself as Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

IVP NT Essentials
Tap or click the image above for a larger view of

Castleman's New Testament Essentials.

Both volumes break down their respective chapters into four parts, which can be compared in the table below:

OLD TESTAMENT ESSENTIALS

NEW TESTAMENT ESSENTIALS

Bible Study—The heart of the study is reading the Scripture itself. This begins with a reading assignment (and a memory verse that captures a central theme). The reading assignment is typically a selection of passages from the topic under study. Also suggested are longer reading assignments that cover the whole topic in the Bible. After reading the assigned passage, questions follow that will help you to think about some of the crucial issues of the passage.

Bible Study—Each chapter focuses on particular texts within the New Testament to be read, as well as a verse or two suggested for memorization. This is followed by initial questions to reflect on and discuss with others from your own reading and observation of the text.

Reading—Each study includes an essay that covers the high points of the biblical texts under discussion. This essay is followed by more questions that hope to prod even further thinking about the biblical text.

 

Reading—In the reading section, the author offers background information and insights of her own and other scholars concerning the passage or passages and their connection to the canon of Scripture as a whole. The reading is followed by more questions to help you think further about the biblical text.

Anticipating the New Testament—This section in particular explores how Jesus is anticipated in the Old Testament. As St. Augustine said, “The New Testament is in the Old Testament concealed; the Old Testament is in the New Testament revealed.”

Connecting to the Old Testament—The reading is followed by a particular connection the New Testament text has to the Hebrew Scripture of the Old Testament.

The Ancient Story and Our Story—In the final major section we will look at the important implications this ancient text has for our lives today.

The Ancient Story and Our Story—The study of the passage ends by considering how the New Testament passage might connect with our own lives today.

These two titles may be purchased individually or together in the IVP Old Testament and New Testament Essentials Bundle. Page numbers are included in the text in case some of your participants are using print copies. However, we think Accordance is the perfect platform for this kind of study because any biblical text can be read and highlighted, and you can answer study questions right in the Accordance User Notes.

Through February 8, get both titles together for only $21.90!

IVP OT NT Essentials

Essentials Bundle: OT Essentials & NT Essentials

  • OT Essentials (Longman)
  • NT Essentials (Castleman)

$26.90

Buy Now 2

IVP-OT Essentials

Old Testament Essentials: Creation, Conquest, Exile and Return (Longman)

$14.90

Buy Now 2

IVP-NT Essentials

New Testament Essentials: Father, Son, Spirit and Kingdom (Castleman)

$13.90

Buy Now 2

 

 


 

Sep 23, 2015 Timothy Jenney

Feast of Tabernacles (Lighting the Lamp Video Podcast #131)

The Feast of Tabernacles was the largest and most joyous of ancient Israel’s three annual pilgrimage feasts. It occurs at the autumnal equinox and celebrates the end of Israel's harvest season. Its importance grew over time as it added spiritual, national, and even eschatological themes. Join Dr. J as he reviews the Accordance resources for researching this greatest of Israelite feasts. [Accordance 11: Study]

See more episodes of Lighting the Lamp on our Podcast Page!


 

Sep 14, 2015 Richard Mansfield

Printing Just What You Need

Have you ever needed to print or make a PDF of a particular selection from a title in your Accordance Library? Here are a couple of tricks for exporting the exact content you need.

UPDATE: Printing is even easier with Accordance 11.1.


 

Jul 27, 2015 Timothy Jenney

Destined for Glory (Lighting the Lamp Video Podcast #127)

Rom. 8:28-30 is interpreted very differently by Wesleyans and Calvinists, a disagreement that often obscures the the point of the passage. In it Paul argues that God has destined his people for “glorification,” an often misunderstood goal reached by an even less understood process. [Accordance 11: Study]

See more episodes of Lighting the Lamp on our Podcast Page!


 

Jul 9, 2015 Timothy Jenney

Jonah (Lighting the Lamp Video Podcast #126)

The story of the prophet Jonah is a delight, filled with unexpected twists and turns. In this podcast, we’ll explore the way it turns the tables on its readers. Expecting judgment to fall upon others, we instead find judgement falling upon ourselves. Join Dr. J as he helps us “hear” the story of Jonah as its ancient Israelite audience would have when they heard it for the very first time. [Accordance 11: Study]

See more episodes of Lighting the Lamp on our Podcast Page!


 

Jun 22, 2015 Richard Mansfield

Playing Audio in Accordance Mobile

 

Accordance Mobile is made for Bible Study on the go, but did you know that it’s great for audio, too? In this week’s Accordance Mobile Minute, we will take a look at playing audio files from Accordance.

Want to know more about Michael Card's Biblical Imagination Series? Check out these other posts:

Bullet 2Dr. J's Lighting the Lamp video podcast #125: Biblical Imagination

In the podcast, Dr. J mentions a few other links, and these can be found here:

Also, check out the Accordance Blog post on Michael Card's Biblical Imagination Series.


Biblical Imagination Series All four volumes of The Biblical Imagination Series by Michael Card come with their musical complements.

$99.90

Buy Now 2

 


 

Jun 6, 2015 Richard Mansfield

Creating Ad Hoc Outlines in Accordance Mobile

Learn how to easily create on-the-fly outlines in Accordance Mobile.

Since the iPad in this video is in portrait mode, we recommend fullscreen viewing.


 

May 21, 2015 Timothy Jenney

Change Focus and Tie/Untie Panes (Lighting the Lamp Video Podcast #123)

Accordance 11.0.6 brings with it two new features: Change Focus and Tie/Untie Panes. Both are designed to enable users to investigate any verse while still being able to see its entire context. Join Dr. J as he demonstrates how these two subtle, but powerful features can make our Bible study both easier and more effective. [Accordance 11: Intermediate]

See our archive of previous Lighting the Lamp podcasts.