Accordance Blog
May 7, 2015 Timothy Jenney

How to Study A Topic (Lighting the Lamp Video Podcast #122)

Not all Bible studies begin with a passage. Some start with a simple question, “What does the Bible say about ______?” Investigations of this kind are called “topical studies” and may well be the most popular kind of Bible study. Topical sermons are certainly a favorite among preachers. In this podcast Dr. J shows us how to study a topic using Accordance—and how to transform that study into three simple kinds of topical sermons.

Download Dr. J's Topical Study Template for Microsoft Word!

Go to our Lighting the Lamp page to see even more podcasts on how to use Accordance Bible Software.


 

Apr 13, 2015 Mikhal Oren

New from Carta: The Raging Torrent & Echoes from the Past

Accordance users already familiar with quality Carta Jerusalem titles such as The Sacred Bridge will be pleased to see two new inscription-related titles added to the Accordance Library: The Raging Torrent and Echoes from the Past.


 

Raging Torrent The Raging Torrent: Historical Inscriptions from Assyria and Babylonia Relating to Ancient Israel

The Raging Torrent (translated and annotated by Mordechai Cogan) collects Assyrian and Babylonian historical inscriptions relating to Israel and its neighbors in biblical times. These inscriptions, composed in cuneiform script between the 9th and 6th centuries BCE, cast new light on many events mentioned in the Bible in greater detail (such as the conquest of Galilee by Tiglath-pileser, the fall of Samaria under Sargon II, or Sennacherib's campaign to Judah). The biblical text and the cuneiform inscriptions present the contrasting viewpoints of opponents at war, of conqueror, and conquered.

The inscriptions are presented here in a new English translation, and each is supplemented by an introduction describing the general background and by extensive explanatory notes and bibliographic references. The translations and annotations, by Prof. Mordechai Cogan of the Hebrew University, are accompanied by many helpful maps and illustrations. Bible students and scholars alike will benefit from the historical insight this work provides.

The Raging Torrent has been carefully analyzed by our developers and content has been tagged to allow for very specific research. Users can search this title by the follow fields: Titles, Texts, English Content, Hebrew Content, Arabic Content, Greek Content, Transliteration, Scripture, Bibliography, Image Captions and Page Numbers.

For even more information regarding this title, see this review by David Vanderhooft of Boston College.

The Raging Torrent screen shot
Click on the image above for a full size product illustration.

 

Buy Now 2 The Raging Torrent
$64.90

 


Echoes from the Past Echoes from the Past: Hebrew and Cognate Inscriptions from the Biblical Period

Echoes from the Past is a collection of inscriptions from the biblical period, in Hebrew and closely-related languages (Moabite, Ammonite, Edomite). It includes historical records and dedicatory inscriptions graven on stone, letters and administrative documents written on ostraca and papyri, weights and measures, and more. Each inscription is shown in photograph and facsimile, and the original text is presented alongside a vocalized Hebrew version and an English translation. A short introduction provides information on the inscription’s provenance and history, and the inscription’s content is discussed in detailed notes expounding its paleographic and linguistic features and its historical context and relation to the Bible; the notes are accompanied by a comprehensive bibliography.

Of particular note are inscriptions such as the inscription of the Meshaʿ Stela, the Siloam Inscription, and the Book of Balaam son of Beor, that feature events and people mentioned in the biblical texts; while many lesser-known texts give us valuable insight on the lives and mores of ordinary people in biblical times. This collection will thus be of great interest to anyone interested in the world of the Bible, whether from a linguistic, an epigraphic, a historical, an archeological, or a religious perspective.

Echoes from the Past was first published in Hebrew in 1992 as The Handbook of Hebrew Inscriptions (אסופת כתובות עבריות), and in 2005 in revised form as HaKetav VeHaMiḵtav (הכתב והמכתב), by Prof. Shmuel Aḥituv of the Ben-Gurion University, a leading Bible scholar and laureate of the 2015 Israel prize. The English translation, published in 2008, was made by Prof. Anson Rainey of Tel-Aviv University, a world-renowned authority on Semitic linguistics and historical geography of the biblical period.

Echoes from the Past has been carefully analyzed by our developers and content has been tagged to allow for very specific research. Users can search this title by the follow fields: Titles, Glossary Entries, Inscriptions Text, Inscriptions Translation, English Content, Hebrew Content, Arabic Content, Syriac Content, Greek Content, Transliteration, Scripture, Bibliography, Image Captions, and Page Numbers.

For even more information, see this review by Matthieu Richelle.

Echoes from the Past Screen shot
Click on the image above for a larger view.

 

Buy Now 2 Echoes from the Past
$99.90


 

Apr 3, 2015 Timothy Jenney

How to Study a Word (Lighting the Lamp Video Podcast #120)

Word studies are one of the core techniques for Bible study. In this podcast, Dr. J provides a simple, step-by-step process for discovering a word’s meaning: Identify, Investigate, and Evaluate. First, he shows us how to identify the original language word behind every word in a Bible translation. He then explains how everyone—those who read Hebrew and Greek and those who do not—can use Accordance to find the range of meaning(s) for every word in the Bible's original languages. Finally, the podcast explains how to pinpoint the precise meaning of a word as it is used in a specific verse.


 

Jan 7, 2015 Richard Mansfield

Free Training Seminars for January & February, 2015

 

seminar photo

We have a number of free Accordance Training Seminars coming up in January and February in Minnesota.

Minneapolis, MN
Friday, January 30, 2015
1 PM - 5 PM (Workshop) 
Special Focus on Greek and Hebrew
Bethlehem College & Seminary
720 13th Avenue S. 
Minneapolis, MN 55415
Room 318-322

Eden Prairie, MN
Saturday, January 31, 2015
9 AM - 6 PM
Eden Prairie Assembly
16591 Duck Lake Trail
Eden Prairie, MN 55346
Fellowship Hall

Plymouth, MN
Friday, February 6, 2015
9 AM - 6 PM
Fourth Baptist Church
900 Forestview Lane N.
Plymouth, MN 55441
Social Hall

Although the cost for these seminars is free, we do ask that you register ahead of time by emailing seminars@accordancebible.com

One more thing... Are you going to the Desiring God Conference, February 2-4? If so, come see us at Booth #34!


 

Jan 7, 2015

Webinar (Recorded): Advanced Hebrew Techniques in Accordance

In the two-part video sessions below, Helen Brown walks participants through advanced Hebrew techniques in Accordance 11.

We recommend watching these videos full screen in high definition.

Advanced Hebrew Techniques, Part 1


Advanced Hebrew Techniques, Part 2

 


If you enjoyed these recorded webinars, we have more available; or you can sign up for upcoming live webinar events.

Accordance Webinars (Main Page)

Upcoming Sessions and Sign-up

Accordance Recorded Webinars (Archives for v. 10 & 11)


 

Nov 26, 2014 Rick Bennett

NIV 2011 with Enhanced Goodrick-Kohlenberger Key Numbers & Phrase Tagging

Rick Bennett, Director of Content Development for Accordance Bible Software, demonstrates the unique features of the recently released NIV 2011 with Enhanced Goodrick-Kohlenberger Key Numbers & Phrase Tagging.

This video can be best viewed full-screen.

This version adds the Goodrick-Kohlenberger Key numbers to the 2011 edition of the NIV as well as enhanced phrase tagging.  This offers users the ability to amplify to Hebrew and Greek dictionaries and perform searches based on the G/K numbers.

The best-selling New International Version seeks to recreate as far as possible the experience of the original audience—blending transparency to the original text with accessibility for the millions of English speakers around the world. This 2011 revision represents the latest effort of the Committee on Bible Translation to articulate God’s unchanging Word in the way the original authors might have said it had they been speaking in English to the global English-speaking audience today.

The new footnotes include much more extensive cross-references.

Owners of the previous 1984 edition of the NIV in Accordance can use it in parallel with the NIV11 in order to compare the translations.


 

Apr 22, 2014 Matt Kenyon

Workspace Wednesday

We at Accordance believe that our software is so much more than just a tool to study the Bible. It's a means of community and creativity. We've created Workspace Wednesday because we want to give you a chance to show us your creative workflow in Accordance.

Watch the video to find out how you can participate:

Join us on social media to post your workspace:

FacebookIconTwitterIconGoogle+YouTube icon

How it works:

  • Take a screenshot of your workspace
  • Post the screenshot to the comments section of our Workspace Wednesday post every Wednesday
  • Hashtag the post with #work_wed
  • Eagerly await sweet victory

How to take a screenshot of your desktop:

Mac users: the keyboard shortcut ⌘Cmd+Shift+3 will take a screenshot of your screen and place the image file on your desktop. If done correctly, you should hear the sound of a camera taking a snapshot.

Windows users: the keyboard shortcut ⌘Win+PrntScrn will take a screenshot of your screen and automatically save it in the Screenshots folder within your pictures folder.

For more information on how to take screenshots with earlier versions of Windows, follow this link.

May the best workspace win!


 

Aug 12, 2013 David Lang

It Was the Serpent!

In preparing for a Sunday School class, I was reading the account in Genesis 3 of God's interrogation and sentencing of Adam, Eve, and the serpent. I've read this passage many times before and am pretty familiar with it, but the English translation I was reading helped me notice something new. After Adam lays the blame for his sin on Eve ("the woman") and even on God ("You gave to be with me"), Eve likewise blames her sin on the serpent. However, most translations render Eve's confession as a simple statement of fact: "The serpent deceived me and I ate." Thus, while Adam comes across like a cornered child defensively casting about for a scapegoat, Eve seems more calm and up front about her sin. That is, until you read the HCSB's rendering: "It was the serpent. He deceived me, and I ate." It's not a huge difference, but by splitting Eve's statement into two sentences, the first of which simply points the finger at the serpent, the HCSB makes Eve's response sound closer in tone to that of Adam.

Because I was so used to the typical rendering of this verse, the HCSB's rendering caught me by surprise and led me to ask, "Is that really what the Hebrew says?"

By the way, this is why it is always helpful to use a variety of translations when studying a familiar passage. When a translation departs from what you're used to, it can expose you to nuances in the text you may have missed before. At the very least, it may prompt you to dig deeper.

For me, digging deeper meant opening the Hebrew text in a parallel pane and examining Eve's response. Cross-highlighting between my English Bible with Strong's Numbers and the tagged Hebrew made identifying the corresponding Hebrew words incredibly easy.

Serpent1

The Hebrew simply has the noun "the serpent" followed by the verb "deceived" with the direct object "me", which would seem to justify the typical translation of "The serpent deceived me." How then, I wondered, could the HCSB justify rendering this simple sentence as two sentences? Were the translators taking liberties with the text?

Then I remembered that in Hebrew, the subject typically follows the verb. In cases like this, where the subject comes before the verb, the subject is generally being emphasized in some way. So the HCSB is not taking liberties with the text, but is bringing out a subtle nuance of the Hebrew which typically gets lost in translation: Eve's emphatic pointing to the serpent as the one to blame.

Now, that naturally got me wondering where else the subject appears before the verb in the Hebrew Bible. In my next post, I'll show you how to use the Construct window to find other occurrences of that construction.


 

Jul 22, 2013 David Lang

Using the MT-LXX Parallel, Part 2

In a previous post, I introduced you to the MT-LXX Parallel, a specialized Reference tool which offers a word-by-word comparison of the Hebrew Bible and the Greek Septuagint. In that post, I showed how to use the MERGE command to piggyback off a search of the tagged Hebrew Bible and tagged Greek Septuagint. This allowed us to search the Hebrew Bible for every occurrence of the lexical form tselem ("image")—no matter what its inflected form—and to see those results displayed in the MT-LXX parallel. We then searched the tagged Septuagint for every occurrence of the Greek lexical form eikon, and used the MERGE command with the MT-LXX parallel to find every place the LXX translates the Hebrew word tselem by some form of the word eikon. The result of that search looked like this:

MTLXXHowTo7

Now, to explore each of these results in context, I can click the Mark arrows at the bottom of the MT-LXX to jump from one hit to the next. But wouldn't it be quicker if we could just scan the relevant lines of the MT-LXX without having to wade past all the other words? Of course it would! Fortunately, this can easily be done by going to the Gear menu at the top left of the pane containing the MT-LXX and choosing Add Titles from the Show Text As… submenu.

MTLXXHowTo8

The result looks like this:

MTLXXHowTo9

Now, to understand what just happened, let's review what the Show Text As… submenu does. When you do a search in a Tool module, Accordance defaults to showing your search results in the context of the entire tool. This is the All Text setting in the Show Text As… submenu. You can, however, choose to show only those Articles or Paragraphs which contain a hit. In the MT-LXX, each verse is an article and each line is a paragraph, so choosing Articles would show each hit verse in its entirety, while choosing Paragraphs would show only the lines containing each hit word. Because showing only the hit paragraphs in a tool is often too concise, you also have the option to Add Titles. This shows the hit paragraphs as well as the titles of the articles in which they appear. In the MT-LXX, choosing Add Titles shows the hit paragraphs together with the verse references.

This more concise view makes it easy to see that there are a couple cases where tselem in the Hebrew column does not have a corresponding eikon in the Septuagint column (or vice versa). In Genesis 1:27, the first instance of tselem is left untranslated, and in Daniel 2:31, eikon is part of a phrase used to translate an entirely different Hebrew word. Why those two "false" hits?

MTLXXHowTo10

The reason we got those two cases where both words are not found on the same line is that Accordance defaults to looking for words within the same article rather than the same paragraph. For example, if you were to search the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary for Moses <AND> Aaron, you might find a long article where Moses is in the first paragraph and Aaron is in the fifth paragraph. In a tool like MT-LXX where each verse is an article and each line is a paragraph, Accordance's default behavior will find any verse that has tselem in the Hebrew and eikon in the Greek, even if they are on different lines and so do not exactly correspond.

To make this search more accurate, we can refine it by specifying that all words must be found within the same paragraph rather than the same article. To do that, click on the magnifying glass on the left side of the search field. At the bottom of the menu that appears, choose Paragraph.

MTLXXHowTo11

Then hit Enter to re-run the search.

MTLXXHowTo12

Here you can see that the false hits have been removed, and we now have only 49 hits rather than 52.

In this post, we've gone a little further in our use of the MT-LXX Parallel to see how you can tweak the display of the search results and how you can specify that the Hebrew and Greek words must appear on the same line. In my next post of this series, we'll go even further.


 

Jul 9, 2013 David Lang

Using the MT-LXX Parallel

When you display the Hebrew Bible and Greek Septuagint in parallel panes of a Search tab, the parallel verses are displayed side-by-side, but it is not immediately apparent which Hebrew word a particular Greek word is translating. For example, in Genesis 1:1, the Greek word ouranon corresponds to the Hebrew word Shamaim. I can see that by dragging my cursor over each word in the Hebrew and Greek to find out which words mean “heaven,” but other than that, there is no easy way to see the relationships between these two texts.

MTLXXHowTo1

That’s where a specialized Reference Tool called the MT-LXX Parallel comes in. This tool, developed by renowned Hebrew and Septuagint scholars, places each word or phrase of the Masoretic Hebrew text in parallel with the corresponding Greek words from the Septuagint.

One obvious use of the MT-LXX Parallel is to place it in parallel with the text of the Hebrew Bible and Greek Septuagint. As a reference tool, the MT-LXX Parallel will automatically scroll along with the biblical text, enabling you to see word-by-word connections for each verse.

MTLXXHowTo2

For example, if we scroll to Genesis 1:26, we can see that the Hebrew word for "image" (tselem) is translated by the Greek eikon (from which we get the word "icon").

To search the MT-LXX Parallel, we need to view it in a separate Tool tab. As with other Tools, the MT-LXX Parallel is divided into different fields of content. To search for all occurrences of the Hebrew word tselem, our natural impulse would be to set the search field to Hebrew and enter that lexical form.

MTLXXHowTo3

Since the Hebrew text of the MT-LXX is not grammatically tagged, our search only finds the 27 instances when tselem appears in that exact form. When we search for tselem in a tagged Hebrew Bible, we get 34 hits because every inflection of tselem is found.

MTLXXHowTo4

Fortunately, we can overcome this limitation of the MT-LXX Parallel by piggy-backing on the tagging of the Hebrew Bible. We do this through the use of an advanced search command called the MERGE command. By merging the MT-LXX Parallel with the tab containing the BHS-W4, the results of my lexical search of the Hebrew Bible are reflected in the MT/LXX. Notice that now the MT/LXX displays 36 occurrences of tselem. (The extra two occurrences are notes or reconstructions in the MT-LXX database.)

MTLXXHowTo5

Using the MERGE command in this way makes for some very powerful searches. For example, suppose I want to find every place where the LXX translates the Hebrew word tselem by some form of the word eikon. To do this, I’ll open a new Search tab containing the Septuagint, and I’ll do a search for eikon. This search finds 40 hits.

MTLXXHowTo6

To see which of these occurrences of eikon correspond to the Hebrew word tselem, I’ll go back to my MT-LXX Parallel, add an AND command, and then add a second MERGE command. This time, I’ll Merge with the tab containing the LXX.

MTLXXHowTo7

This search turns up 52 hits, and I can see that both the Hebrew word tselem and the Greek word eikon are highlighted. Divide the number of hits by two, and we end up with around 26 places where tselem is translated as eikon.

I hope you can see from this brief example how powerful the MT-LXX Parallel database is. In my next post, I'll examine these results in more detail and offer a few more tips for using this powerful resource.