Jump to content


Photo

How to search for Subject Substantival Participles


  • Please log in to reply
No replies to this topic

#1 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

    Silver

  • Accordance
  • 146 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, Italy
  • Accordance Version:10.x

Posted 06 November 2011 - 07:31 AM

The name Participle suggests that they take part of the two different parts of speech: verb and adjective. As verbs, they have tense and voice; as adjectives, they have case and gender and number.

All adjectives, in Greek, can be substantivized if they are arthrous, provided that they are not adjunct to a Noun in the same phrase. If there is, then the article specifies the Noun, and the adjective is an adjunct to the Noun; We use to say that the adjective is attributive. The phrase ὁ πονηρὸς ἄνθρωπος means “the evil man”, as the adjective is adjunct to ἄνθρωπος.
The case is different in the Clause: ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ πονηροῦ (Mat 6:13). This means “deliver us from the evil one" (if we take the Genitive as masculine) or “deliver us from evil” (if we take the Genitive as neuter), as there is no Substantive for the adjective to lean on. This is what interests us now.

In the GNT there are plenty of substantivized Participles. They can be Subject or Complement (Blass-Debrunner-Funk § 411). With the syntax module we can easily search for them.

In this post, we will search for Subject Sustantive Participles (Blass-Debrunner-Funk § 413):

  • Open a new Search Text, choose GNT-T as search text, and choose to search for Words (not Verses) within every Chapter or Book (not Verse, etc)
  • Open a new Greek Construct (Command-2), that will be automatically linked to the Search Text
  • In the Greek Construct window, drag the Phrase element and drop it into the first column
  • When prompted, choose Subject Phrase, then click OK or press Return
  • Drag the Article element and drop it into the first column of the SUBJECT PHRASE
  • When prompted, choose Case: Nominative, then click OK or press Return
  • Drag the Clause element and drop it into the second column of the SUBJECT PHRASE
  • When prompted, choose Dependent and Subject, then click OK or press Return
  • Drag the Verb element and drop it into the first column of the Subj. DEPENDENT Clause
  • When prompted, choose Mood: participle and Case: Nominative
  • We need to leave the box “Search both directions” unchecked, as the article must come before the participle that it specifies.
  • Press Return, or click on the search button.

The results will look like this:

Attached File  Subject Substantival Participles.PNG   251.01KB   6 downloads

If we examine the results, we notice one false hit in Matthew 1:23 μεθερμηνευόμενον. Apart from it, the other results are sound.

The false hit is due to the fact that there are many subordinates in the Sentence, and the search find a remote superordinate Subject Clause. However, we may easily remove any false hit in the same way that we used when searching for coonjunctive Participles.

The reason is the same: a participial Subject Clause always has the same Subject as its superordinate Clause. As a result, the subordinate Subject Clause never encloses a Null Subject. It will be enough to tell this to Accordance.

Let's modify the search:

  • Drag the element VERB participle nominative and drop it into the second column of the Subj. DEPENDENT
  • Drag the element antecedent and drop it into the first column of the Subj. DEPENDENT
  • Drag the element NOT and drop it over ANTECEDENT
  • Press Return, or click on the search button.

The results will look like this:

Attached File  Subject Substantival Participles2.PNG   212.89KB   7 downloads

This time, the results are what we expected.

I hope this helps. If there are questions, they may be posted as replies to the topic.

Edited by Marco V. Fabbri, 14 November 2011 - 07:14 AM.
corrected typographical errors

Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. UniversitÓ della S. Croce
Rome, Italy




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users