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How to search for Accusative and Infinitive


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#1 Marco V. Fabbri

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 10:52 AM

Searches for the Accusative and Infinitive in the GNT-T syntax can be at the same time powerful and easy to prepare.
They can be performed in the Search Text window alone, or in the Greek construct window.
The Greek construct is necessary when we want the elements of the search to belong to the same Clause.

I. Searching for Subject Accusatives and Infinitives in the Search text

Without the syntax, we could have searched for an Accusative and an Infinitive, but that would have returned any Accusative. Most of them would be complements, not subject.

By involving the syntax in the search, we can specify that we only want those Accusatives that are also Subject.

In the Search Text window, we need to enter:

[Subject] @ [ANY accusative]<AND>[VERB infinitive]

The search can be entered manually, or can be copied and pasted, or can be built step by step using the Menu Search: Enter Tag.
The results will look like this:

Attached File  Search Text string.PNG   266.04KB   24 downloads

If we examine the results, we will see many good hits, and it will be apparent that the Accusative and Infinitive has many different uses.
We will also notice that some hits don not actually contain any Accusative and Infinitive. So is the second hit: Matthew 3:7. Here the Accusative πολλούς and the Infinitive φυγεῖν do not belong to the same Clause.
As Accordance searched in any verse, it just happened to find a Subject Accusative and an Infinitive in the same verse.
If we want to make sure that the Accusative and the Infinitive belong to the same Clause, we will need the Greek Construct window.

II. Searching for Accusative and Infinitive in any Dependent Clause

The steps will be:
  • Open a new Search Text, choose GNT-T as search text, and choose to search for Words (not Verses) within every Chapter or Book (not Verse, etc)
  • Open a new Greek Construct (Command-2), that will be automatically linked to the Search Text
  • In the Greek Construct window, drag the Clause element and drop it into the first column
  • When prompted, choose Dependent Clause only, then Any, then click OK (or press Return)
  • Drag the Verb element and drop it into the first column of the DEPENDENT Clause
  • When prompted, choose Mood: Infinitive, then click OK (or press Return)
  • Drag the Subject element and drop it into the second column of the DEPENDENT Clause
  • When prompted, choose Any, then click OK (or press Return)
  • Drag the ANY element and drop it into the same column that already contains the Subject element
  • When prompted, type Accusative, then click OK
  • Select “Search both directions,” in the right upper corner of the window (we do so that it doesn’t matter whether the Subject is found before the Infinitive, or the Infinitive is found before the Subject).
  • Press Return, or click on the search button.
The result will look like this:

Attached File  Infinit+Acc AnyDependent.PNG   238.82KB   30 downloads

If we examine the results, we will see that the number of hits has decreased. The false hits are gone.
We will also notice again the many different uses of the Accusative and Infinitive, and we may now narrow the search to Complement Clauses, or to Subject Clauses, or to Adjunct Clauses.
Let’s try all of them.

III. Searching for Accusative and Infinitive in Complement Dependent Clauses

We can use the existing search and modify it. The steps will be:
  • In the Greek Construct window, double-click on the DEPENDENT element
  • When prompted to “Select the type of dependent clause”, choose Complement, then click OK (or press Return)
  • Press Return, or click on the search button.
The result will look like this:

Attached File  Infinit+Acc Complement.PNG   230.75KB   25 downloads

If we examine the results we will find that some of the Clauses are Complement of a Predicate, such as Matthew 5:32; 8:22; 14:19; 14:28, or 16:13. These are the most characteristic Accusative with infinitive Clauses.
But we will also find some Clauses that are Complement to a preposition, such as Matthew 6:8; 13:4; 13:25.

IV. Searching for Accusative and Infinitive in Subject Dependent Clauses

An Accusative and Infinitive construct may be found also as an Subject Dependent Clause.
We can use the existing search and modify it. The steps will be:
  • In the Greek Construct window, double-click on the DEPENDENT element
  • When prompted to “Select the type of dependent clause”, choose Subject, then click OK (or press Return)
  • Press Return, or click on the search button.
The result will look like this:

Attached File  Infin+Acc SubjectCl.PNG   269.46KB   16 downloads

If we examine the results, we will find that the Subject Clause works as the subject of δεῖ, or καλόν ἐστιν, or ἀνάγκη (ἐστίν understood), etc.

V. Searching for Accusative and Infinitive in Adjunct Dependent Clauses

An Accusative and Infinitive construct may be found also as an Adjunct Dependent Clause.
This can happen in some Adverbial Clauses. Among them, we find some Clauses that we use to call Result Clauses, because of the semantics of the conjunction ὥστε that introduces them. Or we find Clauses that we call (Subsequent) Time Clauses, because of the semantics of the conjunction πρίν that introduces them.
We can use the existing search and modify it. The steps will be:
  • In the Greek Construct window, double-click on the DEPENDENT element
  • When prompted to “Select the type of dependent clause”, choose Adjunct, then click OK (or press Return)
  • Press Return, or click on the search button.
The result will look like this:

Attached File  Infinit+Acc AdjunctDepCl.PNG   266.85KB   8 downloads

If we examine the results, we notice a few a (Subsequent) Time Clauses (Matthew 1:18; 26:34; 26:75), and several Result Clauses (Matthew 8:24; 8:28; 12:22; 13:2, etc.)

Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy

#2 Joe Weaks

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 10:56 PM

More like this, Marco, please.
Joe Weaks
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Sometimes I'm so helpful even I can't stand it.

#3 Marco V. Fabbri

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 01:25 PM

Thank you, Joe. I have something ready that I hope to add tomorrow.
Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy




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