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How to search for Absolute Genitives


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#1 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 05:24 AM

Usually we think of syntax searches as something involving the Greek or Hebrew Construct Window. That is true for complex searches, or searches involving a clause o phrase.

However, many interesting things can be found also in the main Search Window.

If I type:

[ANY genitive]@[Subject]

I will find any Genitive that is Subject. In Greek, this happens when the Predicate is a Genitive Participle.

In other words, the result of the search will be a genitive absolute.

Instead of entering [ANY genitive], I could have entered a part of speech, as [NOUN genitive] or [PRONOUN genitive]. This is good if I want to restrict my search to Prononuns or Nouns. But if I want to make it general, [ANY genitive] will fit better my purpose.
Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy

#2 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 03:51 AM

I have suggested a way of searching for a Genitive Absolute. Sometimes we find two of them, connected with a coordinating conjunction (usually καί).

The second Genitive Absolute may be hard to find, as its Subject can be omitted: it is understood that it is the same as the Subject of the first Genitive Absolute.

As a consequence, we cannot search for a [Subject] that is also [ANY genitive]: Accordance can’t find what is not there.

Rather, we need to search for two Genitive Participles, that are part of two Adjunct Dependent Clauses.

In turn, the two clauses will be part of the same Predicate Phrase, as they are both adverbial adjuncts to the same Predicate

We can do this as follows:

  • Open a new Search Text, choose GNT-T as search text, and choose to search for Words (not Verses) within every Chapter or Book (not Verse, etc)
  • Open a new Greek Constuct (Command-2), that will be automatically linked to the Search Text
  • In the Greek Construct window, drag the Phrase element and drop it into the first column
  • When prompted, choose Predicate Phrase
  • Drag the Clause element and drop it into the first column, within the PREDICATE PHRASE
  • When prompted, choose Dependent and Adjunct
  • Drag the Verb element and drop it into the first column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause
  • When prompted, choose Mood: participle and Case: Genitive
  • Press the option key, click on Adjun. DEPENDENT and drag the whole clause to the first free column of the PREDICATE PHRASE. This will duplicate the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause with its content.
  • Press Return, or click on the search button.

The results are as follows:

Attached File  Screen shot 2011-10-31 at 09.26.34.PNG   273.87KB   15 downloads

Let us examine the results in Search Text Window.

The first hit is Matthew 13:19. The first Genitive absolute is παντὸς ἀκούοντος etc., where παντὸς is the Subject and ἀκούοντος is the Verb in the Predicate. The second Genitive absolute is μὴ συνιέντος. The Verb in the Predicate is συνιέντος. There is no overt Subject, as it is understood that the Subject is still παντός that appeared in the preceding Clause.

The second hit is Mark 6:22. The first Genitive absolute is εἰσελθούσης τῆς θυγατρὸς αὐτοῦ Ἡρῳδιάδος etc., where εἰσελθούσης is the Verb in the Predicate and τῆς θυγατρὸς αὐτοῦ Ἡρῳδιάδος is the Subject. The second Genitive absolute is ὀρχησαμένης. The Verb in the Predicate is ὀρχησαμένης. There is no overt Subject, as it is understood that the Subject is the same that appeared in the preceding Clause.

And so on.

Edited by Marco Fabbri, 31 October 2011 - 07:03 AM.

Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy

#3 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 09:28 AM

If there are questions on Absolute Genitives, they may be posted as replies to the topic.
Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy




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