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New Fonts for Greek Export


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#1 Randy Cue

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 12:35 PM

Is there a way to add new fonts for exporting Greek text? I do have a font called Galatia SIL which does a great job.

 

Soli Deo Gloria,

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#2 Randy Cue

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 04:02 PM

Does anybody have an answer for this question?

 

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Randy



#3 Rick Bennett

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 04:12 PM

You can't specify a font for just Unicode Greek export. But you can set a font for all Unicode export.

 

Attached File  Screen Shot 2013-08-06 at 5.08.49 PM.png   83.93KB   21 downloads


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#4 Boris Repschinski

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 07:34 PM

Does anybody have an answer for this question?

 

Soli Deo Gloria,

Randy

I still think it is way easier to solve the font problems with copying and pasting on the word processor end by defining a style for Greek/Hebrew once and then be done with it.


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#5 Randy Cue

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 10:10 PM

You can't specify a font for just Unicode Greek export. But you can set a font for all Unicode export.

 

attachicon.gifScreen Shot 2013-08-06 at 5.08.49 PM.png

Rick, I'm asking about non Unicode export.

 

Soli Deo Gloria,

Randy



#6 Rick Bennett

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 10:28 PM

Rick, I'm asking about non Unicode export.

 

Soli Deo Gloria,

Randy

 

Galatia SIL is a Unicode font. 

 

The export setting in Accordance which allows you to select a Greek font, e.g. SPIonic, Graeca II, etc. was designed before Unicode was popular (my guess is that Unicode export was not even an option when it was implemented but that is before my time). It is not recommended to use this option any longer since Unicode is the standard.

 

Now whether we could implement another feature that did allow one to select a Unicode font for Greek or Hebrew export is another topic. It's been brought up in a couple threads lately and one point that was made is that it excludes other languages such as Syriac or Coptic. So, what others have recommended, such as Boris above, is to handle this on the word processor side, setting up a style that formats text with a specified font, size, style. I am not as familiar with how this works with mixed text (such as Greek and English); maybe the Word processor automatically applies the style based on the language encoding. Others can chime in. Personally, I have opted to use a single font which supported the languages I was using.


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#7 Randy Cue

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 09:37 AM

Galatia SIL is a Unicode font. 

 

The export setting in Accordance which allows you to select a Greek font, e.g. SPIonic, Graeca II, etc. was designed before Unicode was popular (my guess is that Unicode export was not even an option when it was implemented but that is before my time). It is not recommended to use this option any longer since Unicode is the standard.

 

Now whether we could implement another feature that did allow one to select a Unicode font for Greek or Hebrew export is another topic. It's been brought up in a couple threads lately and one point that was made is that it excludes other languages such as Syriac or Coptic. So, what others have recommended, such as Boris above, is to handle this on the word processor side, setting up a style that formats text with a specified font, size, style. I am not as familiar with how this works with mixed text (such as Greek and English); maybe the Word processor automatically applies the style based on the language encoding. Others can chime in. Personally, I have opted to use a single font which supported the languages I was using.

Thanks, Rick. I was not aware that Galatia is a Unicode font. After trying Galatia as the Unicode font for export, it works well for mixed English and Greek as in a lexicon. I have not tried it with Hebrew, but I will. Thanks again.

 

Soli Deo Gloria,

Randy



#8 Randy Cue

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 10:00 AM

Just an update. Using Galatia as the Unicode font for export has the following effect for Hebrew: it changes the font to Lucinda Sans Unicode which to me is not a problem. The problem comes when you export a passage from an English Bible. It changes the verse numbers from superscripts to subscripts.

 

Soli Deo Gloria,

Randy

 


Edited by Randy Cue, 07 August 2013 - 10:02 AM.


#9 Rick Bennett

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 10:04 AM

Sounds like it isn't designed to handle all that very well. Did you see their Gentium font? 


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#10 Randy Cue

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 03:40 PM

Sounds like it isn't designed to handle all that very well. Did you see their Gentium font? 

I did. It doesn't handle the circumflex accent well. I'll just stick with Times New Roman for now.

 

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#11 Ken Simpson

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 04:58 PM

Hi Randy,

times new roman annoys me because the circumflex is still wrong. I use just plain times for Greek. And I believe it functions OK as an English font :)

 

However, the Times Hebrew is ugly. Ezra SIL is my choice there.


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#12 Randy Cue

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 05:02 PM

Ken,

Thanks for your input. I will keep those recommendations in mind. I agree that Times New Roman does not handle the circumflex accent well.

 

Soli Deo Gloria,

Randy



#13 Ken Simpson

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 06:41 PM

the nicest font for Greek (IMHO) is GFS Porson.

 

Here is a little screenshot. It's outstanding, but all it does well is Greek. The English glyphs are only so so

 

Attached File  GFS Porson.jpg   47.58KB   29 downloads

 

I had forgotten that SBL Hebrew was quite good too...

 

Attached File  SBL Hebrew.jpg   40.32KB   40 downloads

 

Strangely, SBL Greek, while it is very nice in lots of ways, missed on the circumflex!

 

Attached File  SBL Greek.jpg   65.45KB   41 downloads

 

Just looked again at Gentium Alt - is very good for Greek - if you don't like the sloping Porson, this is really very nice.

 

Attached File  Gentium Alt.jpg   69.3KB   32 downloads

 

Ahh- the choice. But why do so many good fonts mess up on the circumflex, and why oh why can't we get one font that gets close in all three!

Love suggestions (and I know it's all a matter of taste.


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#14 Boris Repschinski

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 06:57 PM

 So, what others have recommended, such as Boris above, is to handle this on the word processor side, setting up a style that formats text with a specified font, size, style. I am not as familiar with how this works with mixed text (such as Greek and English); maybe the Word processor automatically applies the style based on the language encoding. Others can chime in. Personally, I have opted to use a single font which supported the languages I was using.

 

When you paste Unicode, some Wordprocessors recognize the language immediately and can use a style designed for this. This also means that there is no tweaking involved.

 

As an example I use Mellel here: I have set up Mellel to use the Times font, which takes care of both English and Greek. As secondary font I have set up SBL Hebrew. Pasting any text, be it Hebrew, Greek or Latin characters, now automatically is formatted that way. Nisus works a little differently - you have to define things over the language tab in preferences -, but in the end gets the same results. The advantage is that if I am writing normal text, font and size remain as I want them to; and if I write in a footnote, which has smaller text in the same font, I don't have to adjust the font size there, either.

 

I have Word, but don't use it for my own writing, so I cannot help there.


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