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Quick q: how conservative is the NIVAC NT?


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#1 Unix

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 04:01 AM

No long discussion needed. I know the publisher is conservative. How conservative is the NIVAC NT? Are there other options, either in Accordance or as printed matter? Maybe some set such as Interpretation that doesn't have only Evangelical contributors?

 

EDIT: found one reviewer stating something about this: "This series of commentaries are a good resource for the Bible student. The author writes about the historic meanings and then makes contemporary applications. Occassionally, they are a little on the liberal side, but overall, well reserached and an asset to the student."
Source: http://www.amazon.co...tag=bestinclass


Edited by Unix, 21 September 2013 - 10:01 AM.


#2 Helen Brown

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 07:42 AM

BestCommentaries.com is an excellent resource for comparing the background and quality of almost any commentary.


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#3 Dan Francis

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 02:31 PM

No long discussion needed. I know the publisher is conservative. How conservative is the NIVAC NT? Are there other options, either in Accordance or as printed matter? Maybe some set such as Interpretation that doesn't have only Evangelical contributors?

 

EDIT: found one reviewer stating something about this: "This series of commentaries are a good resource for the Bible student. The author writes about the historic meanings and then makes contemporary applications. Occassionally, they are a little on the liberal side, but overall, well reserached and an asset to the student."
Source: http://www.amazon.co...tag=bestinclass

 

I find this strange, I owned it for about 20 days, whenever i went to it it seemed quite conservative and with a very strident spirit. The best evangelical scholarship (or any in my mind) in my is Irenic, one may disagree to ones core another position  but it should be done with respect. I called the customer service people at the other company and told them it was not for me. I talked to the Priest at my church and he agreed with me and the strident nature of many works coming out. I am very pleased with the  Everyone's Series. I know the NT it is done only by N. T. Wright, but he is the type of conservative scholar I particularly can benefit from. I cannot wait to see Goldingay's OT counter part. I really enjoy his BOTCW volumes on the Psalms. 

 

-Dan



#4 JonathanHuber

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 02:40 PM

I only have a couple of the NIVAC commentary volumes, and they are all pretty conservative.


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#5 jeremyduncan

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 02:45 PM

I have the set and appreciate it. It is however, quite conservative in my view but still well worth having as long as you have something else to present the rest of the picture.



#6 Unix

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 04:26 PM

What about Baker’s Hendriksen-Kistemaker NT Commentary (12 volumes) $199.99 instead? ^_^



#7 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 07:06 PM

I happen to like the NIVNT-AC. [I am a conservative Christian, though.]

 

I judge the exegesis  to be solid and the principles derived from it as sound. It is conservative and evangelical, but I think it tries to stretch its target audience a bit in its practical applications. Most applications in such churches tend to be individual and moral, rather than communal and [for instance] missional. However, it is going to support traditional family values and the Church's historical stance on moral issues [I hope I said that tactfully enough.] If that is what the reviewer meant by "strident," then I'd agree.

 

The most "irenic" commentary I have ever read in terms of doctrinal positions and scholarship though, is the revised edition of the Expositor's Bible Commentary. That's the one I'd recommend if you are looking for a single commentary that is well-rounded.


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#8 Dan Francis

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 07:54 PM

The most "irenic" commentary I have ever read in terms of doctrinal positions and scholarship though, is the revised edition of the Expositor's Bible Commentary. That's the one I'd recommend if you are looking for a single commentary that is well-rounded.

 

One of the reasons I upgraded to the R-EBC when it came out.

 

-Dan



#9 Dan Francis

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 07:57 PM

What about Baker’s Hendriksen-Kistemaker NT Commentary (12 volumes) $199.99 instead? ^_^

Barclay's New Daily Study Bible - New Testament

Is my suggestion.

And probably equally conservative as the NIVAC but one i own and use quite a bit is the 

39075-s.png

 

-dan



#10 Unix

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 10:15 PM

Dan, I've seen You elsewhere recommending Barclay's New. What makes me hesitate about it is that the original author didn't believe in Trinity plus either of the authors seemed to believe in "Purgatory" in this life. I believe it to be in Afterlife.

There's one review on Hendricksen on bestcommentaries (Thessalonians, Pastorals, Hebrews). The volume is from 1996. Amazon.com Best Sellers Rank: #989,082: http://www.bestcomme...on-j-kistemaker
What interests me the most, are the 2 Cor -volume and the sections on Jas and Jude. The former is from 1997, the latter are from the '80s.



#11 Dan Francis

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 10:51 PM

 What makes me hesitate about it is that the original author didn't believe in Trinity plus either of the authors seemed to believe in "Purgatory" in this life. I believe it to be in Afterlife.

I won't guarantee that everything in Barclay is 100% orthodox but at the same point in time he was a masterful scholar and when he offers a hetro-orthodox opinion he usually gives balance to the other side. Even my beloved Saint Jerome (thoighnot a professional scholar I have always felt him to be my patron), Doctor of the catholic church, was like Barclay an ultimate universalist (believing that demons (fallen angles) and even satan ultimately are redeemed in Christ after purging). I would say i doubt the Hendricksen series is not likely without the occasional hereto-orthodox idea here and there. I do know your budget is limited and you have to make the right choice, A good application based commentary with solid insights from the text is  Barclary or the Everyone series (both limited by being done by one person). Hendricksen is not one series i am familiar with, it may be your best bet but I am unsure. Literally generations have found Barclay useful and how much more now when his quotes have been reattached to the authors (being primarily a devotional work he did not thick it needed to put the sources in and indeed occasionally i think he once said sometimes the source had been forgotten by him). As for the everyone series, you don't find a much more orthodox many than N. Tom Wright, he is evangelical but still an Anglican. Now while I am not much of an evangelical any longer I do appreciate him being a fellow Anglican. If you can compare them a bit before purchase (maybe via amazon or google, which both have good sections of samples) you may make they best decision and like I said. the Hendricksen one may well be the best I have just never used it.

 

-Dan



#12 Dan Francis

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 11:10 PM

What about Baker’s Hendriksen-Kistemaker NT Commentary (12 volumes) $199.99 instead? ^_^

 
CBD has samples of the 2 Corinthians volume you can look at (Mark and 2 corinthians seem to be the only ones in print now), the samples from mark are only from the introduction.
 
-Dan

PS: This series was designed to be a one man work as well but became a 2 person work when Hendriksen died before it's completion.

Edited by Dan Francis, 21 September 2013 - 11:11 PM.


#13 Dan Francis

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 12:01 AM

Dan, I've seen You elsewhere recommending Barclay's New. 

 

And in my devotional studies tonight, points to the reason I value Barclay's work. This is edited down, as I placed it in my journal, note the bracketed occurrences of realm of God were originally KINGDOM. and the note at the end is mine, it's not a hard to find quote but it hand't been noted in the actual commentary. 

 

___

 

There is an unwritten saying of Jesus which never found its way into any of the gospels, but which rings true: ‘Raise the stone and you will find me; cleave the wood and I am there.’ When the mason is working on the stone, when the carpenter is working with the wood, Jesus Christ is there. True happiness, true satisfaction, the sense of God and the presence of Christ are all to be found in the day’s work, when that day’s work is honestly and conscientiously done. Brother Lawrence, the great seventeenth-century saint and mystic, spent much of his working life in the monastery kitchen among the dirty dishes, and he could say: ‘I felt Jesus Christ as close to me in the kitchen as ever I did at the blessed sacrament.’…to enter the [realm of God] is to accept and to do God’s will. So, it is worth anything to do God’s will. Suddenly, as the man discovered the treasure, there may flash upon us, in some moment of illumination, the conviction of what God’s will is for us. To accept it may be to give up certain aims and ambitions which are very dear, to abandon certain habits and ways of life which are very difficult to lay down, to take on a discipline and self-denial which are by no means easy—in a word, to take up our cross and follow after Jesus. But there is no other way to peace of mind and heart in this life and to glory in the life to come. It is indeed worth giving up everything to accept and to do the will of God.… there are many fine things in this world and many things in which we can find loveliness. We can find loveliness in knowledge and in the reaches of the human mind, in art and music and literature and all the triumphs of the human spirit; we can find loveliness in serving our neighbours, even if that service springs from humanitarian rather than from purely Christian motives; we can find loveliness in human relationships. These are all lovely, but they are all lesser loveliness. The supreme beauty lies in the acceptance of the will of God. This is not to belittle the other things; they too are pearls; but the supreme pearl is the willing obedience which makes us friends of God.…The man who was digging the field was not searching for treasure; he came upon it quite by chance. The man who was searching for pearls was spending his life in the search. But no matter whether the discovery was made in a moment or was the result of a lifetime’s search, the reaction was the same—everything had to be sold and sacrificed to gain the precious thing. Once again we are left with the same truth—that, however people discover the will of God for themselves, whether it is in the lightning flash of a moment’s illumination or at the end of a long and conscious search, it is worth anything to accept it unhesitatingly. --William Barclay, The Gospel of Matthew

 

 Agrapha.—(a) Oxyrhynchus Logion 5 (No. 30 in HDB v., art. ‘Agrapha’): ἔγειρον τὸν λίθον κἀκεῖ εὑρήσεις με, σχίσον τὸ ξύλον κἀγὼ ἐκεῖ εἰμί, ‘Raise the stone and you will find me, cleave the wood and there am I.’ The metaphor means that we shall find our Lord in the ordinary occupations of daily life. --L. D. Agate, “Metaphor,” ed. James Hastings, Dictionary of the Apostolic Church

___

 

-Dan



#14 Unix

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 01:14 AM

Which NDSB Gospel volume has the largest number of references to Oxyrhynchus Logions?



#15 Unix

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 08:46 AM

This thread: ReWhat books / commentaries represent conservative scholorship in the Silver edition discusses which commentary sets are conservative and which ones are liberal.



#16 Dan Francis

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 02:09 PM

Which NDSB Gospel volume has the largest number of references to Oxyrhynchus Logions?

 
I honestly could't say… and like i said it wasn't attributed in the commentary. I know I have seen him  make other such references before but I can't say that this is a frequent thing. 
 
-dan
EDIT: PS: Mathew and John are both 2 volume works so it is safe to say they would have the most external quotes.

Edited by Dan Francis, 22 September 2013 - 02:10 PM.





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