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proper names seem to be missing


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#1 Jonna Schmidt

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 03:22 PM

Hi, I was trying to create a list of proper names for Romans 16, since my pastor will be preaching on that passage in a few weeks. I remembered a post from 2011, and I was able to get a verse-by-verse listing of proper names for Romans 16. So far, great.

 

HOWEVER... it seems that two very important proper names (God and Christ) are not included. What am I doing wrong?

 

Or, is this just some sort of "Greek grammar rule" such that God and Christ are not considered proper names? 

 

Thanks for any help or clarification.

 



#2 Getinthebible

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 05:23 PM

The words "god" and "christ" are both titles. God is a title of the individual who has ultimate authority over some one or something. Christ is a title for the individual given authority over some one or something by a higher authority. We do often times use both terms as identifiers though. Just like if we said thanks doc. His name is not doc or even doctor but he is the only doctor there so everyone understands who we are talking about.

#3 Jonna Schmidt

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 06:44 PM

Thanks. Just to make sure that I understand: back in Bible times, the term "Christos" (Messiah), was not understood as a proper noun, and in the same way, the term "god" likewise was not really a proper noun? Just want to make sure that I understand, so that I can use the software accurately.



#4 Getinthebible

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 08:05 PM

To define a word try looking it up and noting the contexts that it is used in.  You can do this with the english but it is way more insightful to do it in the original languages.  Use a key number search or search for a root or lemma.  Then use the analysis window to see how it has been translated.  This can help you understand what is meant in the bible when a word is used.  

 

For example:

 

Key number g2316 is used 6 times as "god".  Use the command [Key G2316]@=god to see those occurrences.  You see that the writers used the same word to refer to false gods, idols, a type of being, and even satan by seeing what these contexts have in common we see that the word "god" is not simply a name but a position or function.  

 

This is just a place to start a word study of course.  And where the fun begins on the journey to mine for God's truth. 

 

You may also find it helpful to look up the equivilant word in the Hebrew or the LXX.   

 

But in short yes christ(greek)/messiah(hebrew) is also a title.  

 

It would make a good exercise to see if you can demonstrate that for yourself.  

 

Remember God is a rewarder of those who seek Him. 

 

Have fun and don't forget to pray for the Holy Spirit's leading before studying. 



#5 Ken Simpson

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 07:23 AM

Hi Jonna, the previous poster is correct - context rules.

 

But in brad terms you are right. A proper noun is "a name used for an individual person, placeor organization". So while Christ may seem like a proper noun, it is actually a title "the anointed one". Only much later did it really take on the function of a proper noun such that Christ was a specific individual, rather than an hellenization of messiah.

 

God is a little more generic. There are many gods, there is a general category of deity, and the term θεος was used for all of those categories, but the thought that it would have been only the name of one God was certainly not in the Greek mindset or language. It is a little more like the word "El" in Hebrew (a generic term) as agains "Yahweh" (a particular name).

 

Hope that all makes a little sense. 


Regards
Ken
Australian Accordance Demonstrator

Administrator, Accordance Exchange

Assistant Minister, Summer Hill Church





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