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#1 davidmedina

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 11:11 AM

As a birthday present I may be getting the BDAG/HALOT combo.

I am trying to decide if it the right tool for me at this time. I look over the BDAG and I am not sure how to use it.

Can someone help me decide if I should be getting it at this moment and how should I be using it.

I do not know any Greek or Hebrew but I am learning some Greek.

Thanks

David
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#2 David_Bailey

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 01:07 PM

Hi David,

 

As a lexicon, BDAG is considered by many Greek scholars to be the "gold standard." I am not a scholar by any means, just a layperson with a strong interest in personal studies of biblical history, theology, culture, and languages.  Have you searched Dr. J's Podcast series for BDAG?

 

I use BDAG only if I want to see a Greek word used both in biblical and non-biblical contexts.  It provides senses within biblical passages and from Greco-Roman literature.  For my studies, BDAG provides much more information than I really need - tons of information. I setup my software tool so that the scripture verse in my bible is highlighted in BDAG.  This allows me to quickly find the sense of the Greek word that pertains to the bible verse.  As you probably know, for each sense of a word, BDAG provides scripture verses that uses the sense in question.

 

When you encounter a word in your readings, what information about that Greek word do you want to see?

 

I've attached a pdf file by Dr. Rod Decker on how to use the BDAG.

 

David

Attached Files


Edited by David_Bailey, 15 December 2013 - 01:15 PM.

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#3 Daniel Semler

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 01:17 PM

Hi David,

 

  I cannot speak for HALOT as I have yet to do anything serious with Hebrew. But BDAG I use frequently. It has extensive discussions of words in many contexts. Particularly useful is treatment of smaller connecting words like prepositions. But as David mentions it can be far more than you are looking for. The discussion of εν for example runs to three and a half pages in my 2nd ed print version. I am just starting working through Decker's reader and BDAG is pretty much a required resource, so I bought it just the other day - it has the advantage of being more portable than my hardcover and being the 3rd ed.

 

  But honestly the answer likely depends upon what you wish to do with Greek. If you intend to be able to pick up a Greek work in κοινη and just read it, you will pretty much need this work sometime. If you want to primarily read in English and then get a little background on the odd Greek word then its very likely more than you need, and not perhaps the most accessible.

 

Thx

D
 


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#4 fmcfee

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 05:34 PM

Hi David,

 

As a lexicon, BDAG is considered by many Greek scholars to be the "gold standard." I am not a scholar by any means, just a layperson with a strong interest in personal studies of biblical history, theology, culture, and languages.  Have you searched Dr. J's Podcast series for BDAG?

 

I use BDAG only if I want to see a Greek word used both in biblical and non-biblical contexts.  It provides senses within biblical passages and from Greco-Roman literature.  For my studies, BDAG provides much more information than I really need - tons of information. I setup my software tool so that the scripture verse in my bible is highlighted in BDAG.  This allows me to quickly find the sense of the Greek word that pertains to the bible verse.  As you probably know, for each sense of a word, BDAG provides scripture verses that uses the sense in question.

 

When you encounter a word in your readings, what information about that Greek word do you want to see?

 

I've attached a pdf file by Dr. Rod Decker on how to use the BDAG.

 

David

David,

 

Thanks for the link to the BDAG help PDF....it was full of information and helped me understand the BDAG resource a lot more even as a beginner....anyone know a similar resource for HALOT?....

Frank


Edited by fmcfee, 15 December 2013 - 05:35 PM.


#5 Abram K-J

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 07:41 PM

I've never seen one, but if someone made one and was kind enough to share it with others, that would be a real help for Hebrew students.


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#6 davidmedina

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 10:45 PM

Thanks David & Daniel. Thanks for the PDF. I Just downloaded the PDF and will look at it tomorrow.

 

 It is that I took a look the other day inside BDAG and it scared me a bit.  From a beginner point of view it look intimidating. For example, the word Agape. What i saw was a lot of greek words and references but hardly any english explanation other that the heading. I was hoping a bit more of discussion in English.

 

I am sure if someone gave me a screwdriver and opened the hood of the ferrari and told me to tune it, I would be as intimidated. :)


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#7 Daniel Semler

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 10:49 PM

I'm pretty no one would ever open the hood of a Ferrari and ask me to go anywhere near it and certainly not with a screwdriver - and certainly not the owner :)

 

Thx

D


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#8 davidmedina

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 11:10 PM

lol. 

 

I think I am sold. Even if I do not use BDAG and HALOT to its fullest now, I am sure that in the near future I will learn to use it and benefit. 

 

One more related question. Any opinions on the Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament? If I have HALOT, will I need it? They seems to be similar.


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#9 Serpentium

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 02:50 AM

lol. 

 

I think I am sold. Even if I do not use BDAG and HALOT to its fullest now, I am sure that in the near future I will learn to use it and benefit. 

 

One more related question. Any opinions on the Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament? If I have HALOT, will I need it? They seems to be similar.

 

I love firstly the TLOT adn TLNT, but they don't have all the entries I search, just the few important ones.

 

Personally I've tried and used for a while the NIDOTTE and NIDNTT.

NIDOTTE is pretty and exaustive, so the NIDNTT. NIDOTTE has a very well made reference and index system, so it is my first theological dictionary every time.

I bought TWOT just recently, so I cannot compare to it, yet.

 

For New Testament, the winner IMHO is TDNT (kittel) which is exaustive, complete, and profound.

 

NOTE:

1.HALOT/BDAG are more like a lexicon dictionary, like an expanded BDB or Strong's;

2.the NIDOTTE/TWOT/TLOT and NIDNTT/TLNT/TDNT/EDNT are theological dictonaries.

 

The former (1) helps mostly in translation, and as a original language concordance (needless, because there are already premade concordance). This is more like a grammar/lexical commentary.

 

The latter (2) helps mostly in understanding the doctrine/theology connected to that specific use of that specific words. With context, quotation, and reference to the hebrew/greek world (in the bible, and out of the bible). This is more like a commentary by lexicon than by scripture ref.



#10 davidmedina

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 06:06 PM

Thanks.
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Blog: The Renewed Mind.

#11 davidmedina

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 11:55 PM

Hi David,

 

As a lexicon, BDAG is considered by many Greek scholars to be the "gold standard." I am not a scholar by any means, just a layperson with a strong interest in personal studies of biblical history, theology, culture, and languages.  Have you searched Dr. J's Podcast series for BDAG?

 

I use BDAG only if I want to see a Greek word used both in biblical and non-biblical contexts.  It provides senses within biblical passages and from Greco-Roman literature.  For my studies, BDAG provides much more information than I really need - tons of information. I setup my software tool so that the scripture verse in my bible is highlighted in BDAG.  This allows me to quickly find the sense of the Greek word that pertains to the bible verse.  As you probably know, for each sense of a word, BDAG provides scripture verses that uses the sense in question.

 

When you encounter a word in your readings, what information about that Greek word do you want to see?

 

I've attached a pdf file by Dr. Rod Decker on how to use the BDAG.

 

David

 

Thanks david, the PDF was VERY helpful. I am going with BDAG now that the "mystery" is gone thanks to the PDF. For what I read the BDAG and Louw Nida compliment each other well. I will take advantage that they are on sale.


Edited by davidmedina, 16 December 2013 - 11:58 PM.

"Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect." Rom. 12:2
 
Blog: The Renewed Mind.

#12 davidmedina

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 11:57 PM

 

I love firstly the TLOT adn TLNT, but they don't have all the entries I search, just the few important ones.

 

Personally I've tried and used for a while the NIDOTTE and NIDNTT.

NIDOTTE is pretty and exaustive, so the NIDNTT. NIDOTTE has a very well made reference and index system, so it is my first theological dictionary every time.

I bought TWOT just recently, so I cannot compare to it, yet.

 

For New Testament, the winner IMHO is TDNT (kittel) which is exaustive, complete, and profound.

 

NOTE:

1.HALOT/BDAG are more like a lexicon dictionary, like an expanded BDB or Strong's;

2.the NIDOTTE/TWOT/TLOT and NIDNTT/TLNT/TDNT/EDNT are theological dictonaries.

 

The former (1) helps mostly in translation, and as a original language concordance (needless, because there are already premade concordance). This is more like a grammar/lexical commentary.

 

The latter (2) helps mostly in understanding the doctrine/theology connected to that specific use of that specific words. With context, quotation, and reference to the hebrew/greek world (in the bible, and out of the bible). This is more like a commentary by lexicon than by scripture ref.

 

Thanks. I bought the NIDNTT-A for the time being, but the NIDNTT/NIDOTTE are in my short list. 


"Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect." Rom. 12:2
 
Blog: The Renewed Mind.

#13 David_Bailey

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 07:44 PM

 

Thanks david, the PDF was VERY helpful. I am going with BDAG now that the "mystery" is gone thanks to the PDF. For what I read the BDAG and Louw Nida compliment each other well. I will take advantage that they are on sale.

 

Glad the pdf document helped you in making your purchase decision. BDAG is an awesome tool, and so is Accordance!

 

 

Thanks. I bought the NIDNTT-A for the time being, but the NIDNTT/NIDOTTE are in my short list. 

 

 

I just bought the NIDNTT-A.  I'm hoping the Mounce NT and OT lexicon will go on sale - I'd like to have it in my Accordance library.  :)

 

David



#14 davidmedina

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 09:45 PM

I really like the Mounce’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words. It was one of the first things I bought for Accordance. 


"Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect." Rom. 12:2
 
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