Jump to content


Photo

Which lexicons should I make my default?

lexicon hebrew greek

  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Paul Daunno

Paul Daunno

    Silver

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 180 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lawrenceville , Georgia
  • Interests:The Bible / Reading books about the Bible / Gadgets & Technology / Woodworking / Photography
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:22 AM

After watching a recorded training seminar yesterday I realized that I could triple click a greek word in Mounce Greek Dictionary or KM for Hebrew and have it take me to my default lexicon.  I actually have my default lexicon set as KM for Hebrew and Mounce for Greek.  Based on the seminar these are not the best choices.  Of those in my library, which would be the best choice for Hebrew and Greek?

 

Attached File  Greek Tools.png   59.71KB   1 downloads

 

Attached File  Hebrew Tools.png   58.76KB   0 downloads


Thanks,
-Paul

 

OS X Yosemite 10.10.1 - iMac Early 2008

iOS 8.1.2 - iPhone and iPad - Current iAccord Release


#2 John Fidel

John Fidel

    Gold

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Accordance Version:11.x

Posted 22 December 2013 - 10:02 AM

Personally I would recommend Louw Nida. It is the most complete and up to date of those in your library. Spiq is good, but very limited in it's content. Thayer is dated and the others are very brief.



#3 JonathanHuber

JonathanHuber

    Platinum

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 904 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denver, CO
  • Interests:Bible study, Greek
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 December 2013 - 10:07 AM

I second the recommendation for Louw/Nida for Greek. Just be aware that it's organized by semantic domains, so there may be multiple entries for a single Greek word. Spicq is a theological word study book, so it's a good resource but won't cover every NT word and therefore isn't the best default.

 

For Hebrew, the Concise Dictionary of Classical Hebrew (BDB is good too but is older). TLOT and TWOT, like Spicq, are aimed at word studies.


Edited by JonathanHuber, 22 December 2013 - 10:14 AM.

2012 non-retina Macbook Pro

OS 10.10.1 Yosemite


#4 Paul Daunno

Paul Daunno

    Silver

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 180 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lawrenceville , Georgia
  • Interests:The Bible / Reading books about the Bible / Gadgets & Technology / Woodworking / Photography
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 December 2013 - 02:56 PM

Thank you both for the suggestions.  I will set those as my default lexicons and give them a try.  You both answered what I was hoping for; which ones are more current and which ones have the most useful information.

 

If I were to upgrade is HALOT/BDAG the way to go or is that too much for a lay person like me who uses Accordance mostly for personal Bible study and preparing to lead our small group?


Thanks,
-Paul

 

OS X Yosemite 10.10.1 - iMac Early 2008

iOS 8.1.2 - iPhone and iPad - Current iAccord Release


#5 PhilT

PhilT

    Bronze

  • Active Members
  • PipPip
  • 89 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney
  • Accordance Version:10.x

Posted 22 December 2013 - 03:20 PM

Paul,

It depends.  Do you have training in the languages, or wish to study them later?

 

I have training but am not a pastor, and use BDAG all the time, but might not cite it in Bible studies.

 

If you are comfortable using the tools that you have then use those.  If you want to dig deeper then BDAG etc. might be useful

 

One question I always ask myself, will the teaching point that I get from using these original language resources be edifying to those who I teach.

 

Leaving you in God's Care and Grace



#6 JonathanHuber

JonathanHuber

    Platinum

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 904 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denver, CO
  • Interests:Bible study, Greek
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 December 2013 - 04:33 PM

Paul,

 

BDAG/HALOT are more exhaustive than these, which is good if you're studying or planning to study the original languages. If not, that exhaustiveness sometimes can be more overwhelming than helpful (I chose not to buy the complete TDNT for this same reason). You already have a variety of standard and theological lexicons, so you may be best served by using them for a while before deciding if you need more information.


2012 non-retina Macbook Pro

OS 10.10.1 Yosemite


#7 davidmedina

davidmedina

    Platinum

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 543 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Juan, Puerto Rico
  • Interests:God, my family, the Bible, photography and film.
  • Accordance Version:11.x

Posted 22 December 2013 - 06:05 PM

Hey Paul, I asked the same question recently about the BDAG/HALOT about a week ago. I had the same concerned. In my case I am trying to learn a little bit of greek to be able to get the most from the tools. I ended up getting them and I am extremely glad aI did. They both are very exhaustive and Accordance just had them on sale about a week ago.

 

On my thread David Bailey posted a link to a PDF about BDAG that helped me a lot. Intro to Using BDAG.pdf

 

I enjoy using the Louw Nida a lot. You may want to check on Mounce Expository Dictionary. It works well with the Mounce Dictionary that comes with Accordance.

 

I also use the TDNT and just got on sale the TWOT. They are both on sale right now

 

Here is the link to that other thread as it may be helpful.


Edited by davidmedina, 22 December 2013 - 06:09 PM.

"Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect." Rom. 12:2
 
Blog: The Renewed Mind.

#8 Paul Daunno

Paul Daunno

    Silver

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 180 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lawrenceville , Georgia
  • Interests:The Bible / Reading books about the Bible / Gadgets & Technology / Woodworking / Photography
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 December 2013 - 08:02 PM

Phil - I don't have any formal training in original languages but am determined to use the resources in Accordance to learn what I can to better understand the text.

Jonathan - thank you for letting me know what I already have is very good and worth investing more time in to learn. Perhaps in the future I will add other lexicons. I do like spending money on Accordance modules

David - thank you for the link to the PDF. I'll read that as time permits. I too have the a Mounce Expository and have found that to be quite helpful. Glad to hear you are getting good use of BDAG/HALOT

Thanks,
-Paul

 

OS X Yosemite 10.10.1 - iMac Early 2008

iOS 8.1.2 - iPhone and iPad - Current iAccord Release


#9 Paul Daunno

Paul Daunno

    Silver

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 180 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lawrenceville , Georgia
  • Interests:The Bible / Reading books about the Bible / Gadgets & Technology / Woodworking / Photography
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:04 PM

I have a follow up question about CDCH.  I am looking into the Hebrew word for grace/favor.  Triple-clicking from the KM dictionary brings me to CDCH since that's now my default lexicon.  The screen shot below is what is found for this word:

 

Attached File  CDCH.png   75.2KB   2 downloads

 

I am interested in the second one that references Ben Sira.  Is the 37.29 meant to refer to that chapter and verse in Ben Sira?  If so, which English word does it pertain to since grace or favor are not found in the NRSVS that I'm using?  Also, what does (Bmg, D)* refer to?

 

While I'm at it, at a high-level what is the significance of Ben Sira and perhaps more specifically the value that it brings to CDCH?  I understand the Bible and DSS but am unfamiliar with Ben Sira and the Inscriptions.

 


Thanks,
-Paul

 

OS X Yosemite 10.10.1 - iMac Early 2008

iOS 8.1.2 - iPhone and iPad - Current iAccord Release


#10 Helen Brown

Helen Brown

    Mithril

  • Admin
  • 8,511 posts
  • Twitter:accordancebible
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:heart in Israel
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, Windows, iOS

Posted 24 December 2013 - 03:31 PM

I am no expert, but:

 

This reference is another entry, nothing to do with Grace.

 

It refers to this MSS of Sirach (BenSira):  תׄתׄח֯נׄגׄ על מטעמים and to the uncertain reading of the word compared to the other MSS, as CDCH says, the others read תענוג.

 

Sirach (Ecclesiaticus) is important because the recently discovered Hebrew MSS  witness to the original of a book which was until then only known in its Greek translation in the Septuagint, and in other translations.

 

DCH does not seem to explain what Bmg stands for, but it seems to stand for one of the MS. The JBL has this sentence: The translation of the Hebrew, which is extant in three manuscripts (B, Bmg, Masada), so I think I am correct.


Helen Brown
OakTree Software

#11 Matthew Burgess

Matthew Burgess

    Silver

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 131 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Charlottesville, VA
  • Accordance Version:10.x

Posted 24 December 2013 - 04:08 PM

Helen is correct; in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a number of fragments containing portions of Ben Sira in Hebrew were discovered in the Cairo Genizah (a storehouse for old or retired manuscripts attached to the synagogue in Cairo).  These fragments were determined to be remnants of five distinct manuscripts, which were designated A, B, C, D, and E.  They are extremely important for the textual history of Ben Sira and for the study of the Hebrew language, because before their emergence the book was known only in other languages such as Greek, Old Latin, and Syriac.

 

So, when the CDCH entry references "(Bmg, D)," it means that this Hebrew form is found in two of the Cairo Genizah manuscripts: B (where it appears in the margin rather than the main text; this is the meaning of "mg") and D.  However, the entry suggests that the form may be a scribal error; the scribe may have intended to use a form of the verb that means "to take delight." 

 

The asterisk at the beginning of the entry indicates that this word does not appear in Brown-Driver-Briggs (which was first published in 1906).  The DCH and CDCH contain approximately 3300 of these "new words."  Approximately one-third of these are words found in manuscripts discovered or published after the publication of Brown-Driver-Briggs (this category includes most of the Cairo Genizah manuscripts, as well as the Dead Sea Scrolls).  The remaining two-thirds are words that have been proposed by modern scholars, based on research in cognate languages such as Ugaritic, Akkadian, and Arabic.         


  • Rick Yentzer likes this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lexicon, hebrew, greek

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users