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Comparison of Hermeneia and Anchor Bible commentaries


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#1 accord

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 03:59 PM

Would someone kindly give their thoughts about the difference between the two commentary sets.  

 

(I have Hermeneia, so a comparison of the two would be very helpful)

 

Thanks!


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#2 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 04:25 PM

I find Hermeneia to be much more scholarly and MUCH more critical. In fact, the editors of Hermeneia seem to have gone out of their way to enlist authors with the most extreme position on a particular book. I find Anchor tame by comparison. I've looked at a number of volumes of Hermeneia where the author's assumptions [or conclusions] on matters of date and authorship were so wildly different from my own the commentary was largely useless to me. Anchor seems to be more "mainstream critical," if that makes sense. It is a liberal commentary series, but it is what I have come to consider standard "university" biblical scholarship. Expect to see scholarly work, but not much that addresses personal faith or spiritual application.


Edited by Timothy Jenney, 20 February 2014 - 07:22 PM.

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Blessings,
"Dr. J"

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#3 accord

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 05:18 PM

Thanks Dr. J!


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#4 Robert Holmstedt

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 05:53 PM

As with most sets, it all depends on the individual volume.

 

For instance, John Collin's Hermeniea volume on Daniel is hands-down the best in print and very readable. But Walther Zimmerli's Hermeneia volume on Ezekiel won't make a whole lot of sense unless you understand what he's really doing with his redaction analysis, which is quite sophisticated. Similarly, there are Anchor volumes that I find pretty useless (Genesis, Judges), others that are very readable and middle-of-the-road (Ruth), and others that are provocative in interesting ways (Deuteronomy). 

 

I'm using Klein's 2 Chronicles volume right now and find it to be quite good, whereas the Anchor 2 Chronicles volume is weak.

 

Cost aside, any serious scholar will consult both series.


Associate Professor, Ancient Hebrew and Northwest Semitic Languages
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#5 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 07:23 PM

I absolutely agree with Robert about John Collins's volume.


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#6 Dan Francis

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 07:25 PM

I forgot Continental was not included in Accordance.... I was about to say I found the Continental volumes more useful..... I find for myself all in all I use Anchor more than Hermeniea but I love most of the Continental volumes and use them more than Anchor, but that is just me...

 

-Dan


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#7 accord

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 09:17 PM

Thank you Robert, Dan, and again Dr. J.

 

Attempting to come to a conclusion regarding the wonderful Anchor sale before it ends.  So I greatly appreciate any and all review of the set.


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#8 Unix

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 08:09 PM

EDIT2: I have now listed my best commentaries: http://community.log...164.aspx#572164 ... (a few of them are as printed matter).

 

EDIT: OK I bought AYBC NT @ 7:10 PM from Accordance for the sale price and a few individual volumes from the Reading New Testament set Edited by Charles H. Talbert in OliveTree (which I didn't have since before, store-wide sale ended today), just to complement (got away with $59.12 including an English full Bible (REB) and an additional English NT) and I don't want to purchase there again or see their offers. I received very helpful guidance on the Logos forums. The last things they were saying was to get just the very best individual volumes and to ask uni if Anchor Bible can be used/cited.

 

I'm also interested in comparing these sets, and I have Continental Commentaries as well and they are good.
I have Hermeneia, all volumes except one of the two 1 Enoch volumes and one of the Ps volumes.

I have recently posted about deciding whether to buy the Anchor Bible New Testament set, there I specify my questions:
http://www.christian...s.com/t7806343/

http://www.christian...8/#post65060628

More about what I have:
I have a 3 Cambridge Greek Testament volumes (Mark 2nd Edition, Romans, Hebrews), UBS Translator's Handbook New Testament (in Accordance, bought used for $90 + the license transfer fee) and Upgrade (6 vols., in Logos), and I'm going to buy two volumes by Peter H. Davids on Jude (the commentary in Accordance is from 2006).
And from this post: http://community.log...067.aspx#550067 ... You can see a list of the commentaries I have, scroll down a little bit. I have for example 3 volumes of Interpretation, 2 volumes of Eerdman's Critical Commentary (on Jn incl. introduction and indtroduction to 1-3 Jn, by Urban C. von Wahlde), 5 volumes of Paideia (the most recent ones + Romans), Baker NTC by Hendriksen and Kistemaker (also available in Accordance), Moffatt New Testament Commentary Series (15 vols., excluding 1 Cor), The Case for Mark Composed in Performance (Biblical Performance Criticism) by Antoinette Clark Wire, Sheffield New Testament Guides: John by Barnabas Lindars.

If I include printed matter I also have for example 2 ICC volumes (one of them in Logos and on February 2014 sale right now for $44.95 - it's Thrall on 2 Cor volume 1 (chapters 1-7)), Gospel of John by Frederick Dale Bruner, James (New Testament Readings) by Richard Bauckham, Companion God a cross-cultural commentary on the Gospel of Matthew rev. ed. by George T. Montague. I also have an older out-of-print (1978) theological commentary on Jn by Pheme Perkins.

Additionally I have 5 denominational commentaries, for example 4 Mennonite commentary volumes.

 

Would the Anchor New Testament set complement what I have in a nice way? Or would the New Interpreter's Bible 12-volume set be a better purchase instead of the Anchor Bible New Testament - does Interpreter's rely less on historical-criticism (that would be desirable)? The latter is under development, source: http://www.accordanc...showtopic=12102
Do You agree that before individual commentary volumes get older than 28 years old You should look for newer alternatives?
Can some commentary volumes be seen as classics, such as Brown on Jn (60's-70's), Plummer (1903, Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges) on 2 Cor and Moffatt on Hebrews?

Does Anchor have more than just the Historical-Critical scholarship?

EDIT March 3. 2014 2:37 PM local time (GMT +1h): Look at how quickly the upgrade is progressing! It came out on pre-pub Wednesday Febr. 26. 2014. It's now Monday and it might enter production today:

 

3716.aybrlu.progressed.fast.png_2D00_550

 

Previously edited by Unix, 25 February 2014 - 1:42 AM
Previously Edited by Unix, 01 March 2014 - 5:58 PM


Edited by Unix, 03 March 2014 - 08:36 AM.


#9 Serpentium

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 03:55 AM

Since HERMENEIA is on sale for this week, I wanted to contribute saying that it is the most precious commentary I own.

It opens my eyes to new ideas and possibility. Often I dont like them, or I consider them wrong, but nevertheless they stretch my understanding of the Bible.

 

I like a lot some books of the set, and I love when they tell you the history of the interpretation of some passages i.e. parables.

Love it love it love it


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#10 Gordon

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 06:18 AM

Professor Shalom Paul's AMOS in the Hermeneia collection is a masterpiece of scholarship. I have consulted it in the library on many occasions.  He is also a wonderful lecturer and a master teacher. He is also the author of the Eerdmans commentary on Isaiah 40-66 which is another masterpiece.  Do I sound biased?  Well, yes I am.  I know the professor and have had the privilege of studying with him in the past.  He is a graduate of the Jewish Theological Seminary in NYC and  emeritus Professor of Bible at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem where he taught for decades and was one of the most popular lecturers in the Bible department.  Unfortunately, the AMOS volume is not available for purchase on accordance by itself.   I have his Eerdman's volume on Isaiah on my kindle and always consult it when studying any material from Isaiah 40-66

 

Btw. The AMOS volume is Prof Paul's  translation of his Hebrew volume on AMOS which was published by the Hebrew University Bible Project called MIKRA L'YISRAEL  מקרא לישראל

Likewise, Shalom Paul's commentary on Isaiah is his translation of his Hebrew volume on ISAIAH 40-66 published by the Hebrew U. Bible Project as well.


Edited by Gordon, 02 September 2014 - 06:24 AM.

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#11 Dan Francis

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 01:34 PM

I know the junior minister at my Church has Hermeneia and she loves it other than she said to me once each verse had enough ideas for her to explore into a full sermon on each. I myself not being a pastor sometimes fine some volumes tediously long when studying a passage but it is useful no doubt.

 

-Dan


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