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Request: Ancient Near Eastern Texts and tools relating to the Old Testament


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#1 Pchris

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 03:27 PM

First of all, I'd like to say that using Accordance has been an amazing experience which has enhanced my Old Testament studies to a whole new level. Many subjects concerning the Bible is extensively covered by the program, and I suspect that only few "holes" remain. One of them, however, would be my other specialty, The Ancient Near East. So I decided to make this module request - While I have most of the works mentioned below in my personal library, seeing them in my Accordance library would be a dream come true.

Before making this topic, I searched this particular forum for identical topics to make sure that I wouldn't be repeating what other people already have requested. I then took notice of these three topics - RobM's "Ancient Texts" from May 2009. A.D. Riddle's "Dictionaries for Ancient Languages" from May 2011, and finally tis454's "Akkadian" from December 2013.
 

1. RobM didn't specify what Akkadian texts he wanted other than a transliterated edition of Codex Hammurabi and similar law collections; On that note, I'd like to request Martha Noth's Law Collections from Mesopotamia and Asia Minor (Second Edition, SBL - Writings from the Ancient World Series, Scholars Press, Atlanta, 1997), seeing that it contains the most important law collections from the Ancient Near East.

Other important Akkadian text editions I'd like to see would be:

 

A. R. George's The Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic - Introduction, Critical Edition and Cuneiform Texts Vol I & II (Oxford University Press, 2003) - of all the Gilgamesh editions I've read, this one is without a doubt the best.

 

W.G. Lambert, A.R. Millard and M. Civil's Atra-Ḫasīs - The Babylonian Story of the Flood with the Sumerian Flood Story (Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake, Indiana, 1999)

 

W.G. Lambert's Babylonian Wisdom Literature (Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake, Indiana, 1996)

 

2. A.D. Riddle asked for a few interesting dictionaries, and I, too, would really like to see the following: 

 

J. Hoftijzer and K. Jongeling's Dictionary of the North-West Semitic Inscriptions. (Leiden: Brill, 1995)

G. del Olmo Lete and J. Sanmartín's A Dictionary of the Ugaritic Language in the Alphabetic Tradition. Vol I & II (Leiden: Brill, 2004)

 

Jeremy Black, Andrew George, and Nicholas Postgate's A Concise Dictionary of Akkadian. (CDA) (2nd corrected printing. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2000)

 

The Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago (CAD) - Quite the tour de force, that one!

I'd also like to request these dictionaries:

Wolfram von Soden's Akkadisches Handwörterbuch Band A-L, Band M-S and Band Ṣ-Z (Otto Harrasowitz, Wiesbaden, 1965, 1972 and 1981) - I am aware that it's written in German, which might alienate some, but it is arguably the best Akkadian dictionary there is. E.g. unlike the CAD (and CDA!), the AhW lists several verbal forms in its entries. Another problem with CAD is the vast amount of - albeit relevant - information. AhW is only in three volumes and almost always manages to tell the reader all he or she needs to know.

Michael Sokoloff's A Syriac Lexicon. A Translation from the Latin, Correction, Expansion, and Update of C. Brockelmann's Lexicon Syriacum (Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake, Indiana, and Gorgias Press, Piscata Way, New Jersey, 2009)

 

J. Payne Smith's A Compendious Syriac Dictionary (Clarendon Press, 1967)

3. Of course, there are also a lot of great grammars out there I'd like to see:

 

Wolfram von Soden's Grundriss der Akkadischen Grammatik (2nd edition, Pontificum Institutum Biblicum, Roma, 1969) - again, seeing that the German language might pose a problem, Harry Hoffner's translation of Arthur Ungnad's "Akkadian Grammar" (Fifth corrected edition, SBL - Scholars Press, Atlanta, 1992) is a good alternative.

Takamitsu Muraoka's Classical Syriac. A Basic Grammar with a Chrestomathy (Second, Revised Edition, Harrasowitz Verlag, Wiesbaden, 2005)

 

Franz Rosenthal's A Grammar of Biblical Aramaic (Sixth, revised edition, Harrasowitz Verlag, Wiesbaden, 1995)

 

Stanislav Segert's Altaramäische Grammatik mit Bibliographie, Chrestomathie und Glossar (2nd edition, Verlag Enzyklopädie Leipzig, 1975) - This exceptionally brilliant grammar covers all Aramaic dialects and not just the biblical material. There doesn't seem to be any English alternatives to this, though.

 

Stanislav Segert's A Basic Grammar of the Ugaritic Language (University of California Press, 1984) - Great for beginners but usable in general as well.

 

Daniel Sivan's A Grammar of the Ugaritic Language (Brill, Leiden, 1997)

 



#2 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 03:30 PM

+10

 

I agree. We've long been short on ANE texts.


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#3 Niko

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 04:05 PM

Yes please!



#4 Pchris

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 02:19 PM

Great with some positive feedback - I'll be looking forward to the day when it happens!
Speaking of which, any idea when/if it will? I know this is a slightly unfair question, though - the CAD alone would probably take several months to complete, not to mention getting green lights from the various authors/publishers to digitalize their respective works..



#5 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 03:05 PM

[chuckle] O, that I were a prophet!

 

I've wanted the Pritchard's ANE books in Accordance for some time. As long as we're wishing, I'd love to see Goodenough's Greco-Roman Symbols, along with the site report of Dura-Europos. These are some of my favorites, but I have no idea how wide a market there is for them.


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#6 Pchris

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 03:57 PM

I suppose it's the same problem with the Ancient Near East and its literature: It's a small niche field which yields an equally small market, even though the ANE sources are so important for the understanding of the Old Testament. But it does make sense, though: With Assyriology (and my specific "strain" of Old Testament Exegesis), you're expected to master an absurd amount of dead and living languages, making it an extremely inaccessible and time consuming venture - It took me a good four years to master most of the linguistic tools necessary for comparative analysis of Biblical and ANE material, but there is always room for improvement, seeing that I still need to learn Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs and Hittite. And even then, there's certainly more I could work on.

So I guess the odds for more ANE-texts in the foreseeable future are somewhat slim, but hey, a guy can dream, right? On a positive note, it's comforting to see that Accordance already got the Aramaic Inscriptions from Egypt and the Ugaritic texts covered. I hope the trend continues!


Edited by Pchris, 13 August 2014 - 04:22 PM.

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#7 nicklaurence

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 04:02 PM

+1 for all these resources.
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#8 Gordon

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 04:39 PM

Accordance is selling  THE CONTEXT OF SCRIPTURE.  How does this 3 volume set stand up against ANET or the other volumes mentioned?

 

http://www.accordanc...xt of Scripture


‏ כִּ֤י לֶ֣קַח ט֭וֹב נָתַ֣תִּי לָכֶ֑ם תּֽ֝וֹרָתִ֗י אַֽל־תַּעֲזֹֽבוּ׃


#9 Pchris

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 05:10 PM

Compared to ANET, I'd say COS is a welcome addition. All in all, it's "better" than ANET if you ask me. ANET is still a classic though, and an important one at that.
But it has a a few distinct weaknesses which it also shares with ANET - it only features translations of the texts, whereas there are no transliterations or facsimiles/photographs of the ANE material whatsoever. And seeing that COS only focuses on texts immediately relevant to the Bible, much important material is thus omitted. E.g. only Tablet XI of the Gilgamesh epic is included, whereas A.R. George's work mentioned in my original post covers the whole thing thoroughly.



#10 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 08:27 AM

I agree. I'd prefer to have the entire ANE corpus, even if it is just for texts with canonical parallels.

Ditto for NT background materials, though Accordance has done very well in including the rabbinic, pseudepigraphic, and apocalyptic works.
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#11 Pchris

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 05:58 PM

Hm, that reminds me - There is this huge photograph database called "The InscriptiFact Project" by The University of California, West Semitic Research. The thing is that they have thousands of these very high quality pictures covering many of the ANE inscriptions. We used the database as a part of the curriculum for my Ugaritic class three years ago, and working with HQ photos of the actual clay tablets yourself is quite a different experience compared to working with any transliteration. I was wondering if a similar feature (or perhaps the actual pictures from InscriptiFact) also could be implemented in Accordance someday in a manner like with the Dead Sea Scrolls Images module.


Edited by Pchris, 16 August 2014 - 05:58 PM.

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#12 Gordon

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 07:52 PM

The Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library is online here:

 

http://www.deadseascrolls.org.il/

 

Enjoy!


Edited by Gordon, 16 August 2014 - 07:53 PM.

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‏ כִּ֤י לֶ֣קַח ט֭וֹב נָתַ֣תִּי לָכֶ֑ם תּֽ֝וֹרָתִ֗י אַֽל־תַּעֲזֹֽבוּ׃


#13 Pchris

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 06:31 AM

Oh yeah, nearly forgot about that one - really great webpage. InscriptiFact has some Dead Sea Scroll material as well, but http://www.deadseascrolls.org.il/ got more pictures available from all the caves at Qumran, I believe.


Edited by Pchris, 19 August 2014 - 04:22 AM.


#14 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 07:56 AM

Hm, that reminds me - There is this huge photograph database called "The InscriptiFact Project" by The University of California, West Semitic Research. The thing is that they have thousands of these very high quality pictures covering many of the ANE inscriptions. We used the database as a part of the curriculum for my Ugaritic class three years ago, and working with HQ photos of the actual clay tablets yourself is quite a different experience compared to working with any transliteration. I was wondering if a similar feature (or perhaps the actual pictures from InscriptiFact) also could be implemented in Accordance someday in a manner like with the Dead Sea Scrolls Images module.

Oooo...


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#15 Pchris

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Posted Today, 05:16 PM

 

 

Oooo...

 

InscriptiFact is indeed an exceptional database, but they don't have pictures of everything yet. For instance, while they do have a lot of the Amarna Letters from the British Museum of London, they still lack the letters from the Vorderasiatische Museum of Berlin - Fortunately, this webpage has most of them:

 

http://amarna.ieiop....es/maineng.html

 

I haven't managed to find a webpage/database that contains HQ pictures of the letters from The Egyptian Museum of Cairo, though. Do you know any?


Edited by Pchris, Today, 05:17 PM.





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