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Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words


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#1 Enoch

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:54 PM

Vines Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words.

I can't believe it, but apparently Accordance does not have this Dictionary.

#2 HansK

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 05:39 AM

Incrediible. This is not only a Dictionary, but also a Commentary.

 

Very good to have in A.



#3 PhilT

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 06:04 AM

I thought Stephen Renn updated this dictionary some time ago and is now in some packages as Renn's dictionary.  I may be wrong.



#4 Dan Francis

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 01:05 PM

I use to value this dictionary a lot but had been advised it's scholarship was suspect in many places. 

 

I use this as an example:

 

--------------------------------------------------
DEMON, DEMONIAC  
 
A. Nouns.  
1. daimon (δαίμων, 1142), “a demon,” signified, among pagan Greeks, an inferior deity, whether good or bad. In the NT it denotes “an evil spirit.” It is used in Matt. 8:31, mistranslated “devils.”  
Some would derive the word from a root da—, meaning “to distribute.” More probably it is from a similar root da—, meaning “to know,” and hence means “a knowing one.”¶  
 
 
W. E. Vine, Merrill F. Unger, and William White Jr., Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (Nashville, TN: T. Nelson, 1996), 157.
--------------------------------------------------
 
The italics and bold are mine. I had consulted numerous other lexicons and couldn't find one that even entertained that possible alternative etymology. Now it is very true demons are knowing in scripture, but it appears to be grasping here with nothing to back it up. Now I depend on lexicons, and maybe this is a valid option. but it leaves me wary of the volume.
 
-dan
PS: Complete Word Study Bible by AMG does support this etymology but I have also been cautioned of it too.

Edited by Dan Francis, 25 August 2014 - 01:13 PM.


#5 Rick Bennett

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 01:06 PM

I don't recall the exact reason why we do not have Vine's, but we do have Renn's, and Mounce's Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (which was marketed as Vine's for the 21st century). Mounce is also nicely integrated with the Greek and Hebrew dictionaries included with our Strong's / Key Number Bibles. 


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#6 HansK

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 04:22 PM

Renn's is not a revised version of Vine's.

Please add the Vine's to Accordance. I often refer to this work, which was endorsed by F.F. Bruce.

Some entries in Vine's are dated, but which work is not dated?  :)


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#7 Enoch

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 05:14 PM

 

I use to value this dictionary a lot but had been advised it's scholarship was suspect in many places. 

 

I use this as an example:

 

--------------------------------------------------
DEMON, DEMONIAC  
 
A. Nouns.  
1. daimon (δαίμων, 1142), “a demon,” signified, among pagan Greeks, an inferior deity, whether good or bad. In the NT it denotes “an evil spirit.” It is used in Matt. 8:31, mistranslated “devils.”  
Some would derive the word from a root da—, meaning “to distribute.” More probably it is from a similar root da—, meaning “to know,” and hence means “a knowing one.”¶  
 
 
W. E. Vine, Merrill F. Unger, and William White Jr., Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (Nashville, TN: T. Nelson, 1996), 157.
--------------------------------------------------
 
The italics and bold are mine. I had consulted numerous other lexicons and couldn't find one that even entertained that possible alternative etymology. Now it is very true demons are knowing in scripture, but it appears to be grasping here with nothing to back it up. Now I depend on lexicons, and maybe this is a valid option. but it leaves me wary of the volume.
 
-dan
PS: Complete Word Study Bible by AMG does support this etymology but I have also been cautioned of it too.

 

My guess is that few lexicographers will do much on etymology nowadays, as it is a field greatly attacked.  I think most would fear an attack if they paraded out supposed etymologies.  I like them, but I also can take them with a grain of salt.    It is true that a person without training in this area might put too much faith in them.  I would hardly put any weight on an explanation of justification as "just as if you had never sinned."  But methinks that in the olden days, etymologies were the bee's knees; then in came synchronic linguisticsm, as if the total explanation of a chess game at any point was merely the position of the pieces, not how they got there -- still you need to know whose move it is.



#8 Dan Francis

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 06:05 PM

My guess is that few lexicographers will do much on etymology nowadays, as it is a field greatly attacked.  I think most would fear an attack if they paraded out supposed etymologies.  I like them, but I also can take them with a grain of salt.    It is true that a person without training in this area might put too much faith in them.  I would hardly put any weight on an explanation of justification as "just as if you had never sinned."  

 

Probably the example I am thinking of in english is cock and clock... A rooster may make an alarm in the morning. But does not mean clock is derived from the former.

 

-Dan

PS: Thankfully that worked...some forums see that as a foul word.. pun intended..


Edited by Dan Francis, 25 August 2014 - 06:07 PM.

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#9 davidmedina

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 09:10 PM

Vines was probably one of the first books (after the Bible, of course, that I bought after I became a Christian back in 1980. It was recommended by my pastor and it was a nice hardbound edition and I still have it. It used to be my go to dictionary and I do have it in Logos. But to be honest, since I started to use Mounce's I haven't used Vines much if at all mostly because the same information but more updated (or less out of date) can be found in Mounce's. It probably should not be too much work to add it to Accordance.


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#10 Daniel Semler

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 09:37 PM

Hey Dan,

 

  LSJ reports almost the same derivational information :

 

B = δαήμων, knowing, δ. μάχης skilled in fight, Archil.3.4. (Pl.Cra.398b, suggests this as the orig. sense; while others would write δαήμονες in Archil., and get rid of this sense altogether; cf. however αἳμων. More probably the Root of δαίμων (deity) is δαίω to distribute destinies;; cf. Alcm.48.)


“δαίμων,” LSJ, 366.

 

  Can't say I especially convinced by either and I'd certainly like to see what that Brill publication (oops forgot the ref : http://www.accordanc...showtopic=12969) says, but ....

 

Tx

D


Edited by Daniel Semler, 25 August 2014 - 09:47 PM.

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#11 Enoch

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 09:01 AM

Hey Dan,

 

  LSJ reports almost the same derivational information :

 

B = δαήμων, knowing, δ. μάχης skilled in fight, Archil.3.4. (Pl.Cra.398b, suggests this as the orig. sense; while others would write δαήμονες in Archil., and get rid of this sense altogether; cf. however αἳμων. More probably the Root of δαίμων (deity) is δαίω to distribute destinies;; cf. Alcm.48.)


“δαίμων,” LSJ, 366.

 

  Can't say I especially convinced by either and I'd certainly like to see what that Brill publication (oops forgot the ref : http://www.accordanc...showtopic=12969) says, but ....

 

Tx

D

Thanks for another great post.  I am thankful that the L&S tradition was begun before the more modern allergy to etymology & philology arose (Who shot clock Robin?) with the "rolling of the eyes" at etymologies.


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