Jump to content


Photo

Help with putting together first Accordance pkg.


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 knight777

knight777

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Accordance Version:10.x

Posted 01 July 2005 - 09:25 PM

Hi guys,

I've decided to get Accordance but I really don't know what to get. Everything looks great. I thought I'd just describe the type of Bible study I want to do and then the official support people and the experienced crowd could help a newbie out.

Let's assume that price isn't an issue but that I don't want to get more than I need. Hence I don't want to layout $1000 for the whole deal only to discover that 90% of what I need can be had for $100.

1) Language is very important to me, but I'm not a trained Greek or Hebrew anything. Still, I want to be able to reference the original Greek and Hebrew. So any material that helps a beginner get started in understanding the original languages would be welcome. I won't be doing a Ph.D or anything but more than the basic dictionary stuff would be great.

2) Historical commentary is more important to me than theological commentary. For example, I'm more interested in the historical/cultural of a particular passage than a theological explanation. I know that sometimes these are tied closely together, but things that read more like a History textbook are better (for my purposes) than things that read like a religion textbook.

3) I don't need every version of the Bible, but having 5 or 6 translations would be a good thing. I'd like at least the NIV, ESV, KJV, and NASB.

4) Its important that I can take my own notes and have them associated with Bible verses... kind of like writing my own commentary. Is this possible with Accordance? Or is there a special module/add-on that helps with this? Its not a deal breaker, but it would be adding chocolate syrup and bananas to good ice cream.

5) I don't need fancy multi-media stuff, audio/video anything, or big colorful maps (unless they come with solid, history information).

6) Feel free to suggest something that a serious beginner might want.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions and recommendations!

#2 David Lang

David Lang

    Platinum

  • Accordance
  • 764 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mount Dora, FL
  • Interests:Accordance development, writing, spending time with my wife and five kids
  • Accordance Version:9.x

Posted 01 July 2005 - 09:55 PM

I've decided to get Accordance but I really don't know what to get. Everything looks great. I thought I'd just describe the type of Bible study I want to do and then the official support people and the experienced crowd could help a newbie out.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions and recommendations!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


From what you've described, I would say that you want to start with either the Standard or the Premier level of the Library 6 CD-ROM. Either package would get you the King James and the NASB with Strong's numbers, giving you basic access to the Greek and Hebrew behind those two translations. The Standard level also gives you your choice of two additional translations, so you could get the ESV and NIV included. (The Premier level also includes the NLT and your choice of one more translation)

In terms of commentaries which offer background information rather than devotional/theological interpretation, your best bet would be to supplement the Library with the Essential IVP Reference Collection CD-ROM, which includes a Bible Background Dictionary and Commentaries (as well as a bunch of other top-notch reference material).

With respect to User Notes, you can do that with any Accordance package.

You only THINK that you don't need fancy multimedia stuff, but if you're interested in historical background information, you should seriously consider looking at our Atlas, Bible Lands PhotoGuide, and Timeline. All of these are cool enough to wow your friends and neighbors, but even better, they offer a lot of meaty information on the historical and geographical context of the Bible.

To summarize, I'd start with the Standard Level of the Library, and then, as funds allow, supplement with the IVP Collection, followed by the Atlas, PhotoGuide, and Timeline . . . in that order.

Hope this helps.
Sincerely,
David Lang
Accordance Developer
http://www.accordancebible.com

Author:
Feet to Follow, Eyes to See
http://feettofollow.wordpress.com

Macs in the Ministry
http://www.macsinministrybook.com

Leader of the "Lang Gang"
http://www.langgangland.com
http://twitter.com/DavidAllenLang

#3 Joe Weaks

Joe Weaks

    Platinum

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,086 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Odessa, TX
  • Interests:I like things that are Orange, and possibly Blue.
  • Accordance Version:11.x

Posted 01 July 2005 - 10:43 PM

I would definitely go with the Anchor Bible Dictionary instead of the IVP stuff (which is not top notch by many standards). I'll second the recommendation for Photo Guide... Photo Guide... Photo Guide.
I guess the Strong's stuff is fine, although I've long thought that looking up a Greek word just for the sake of seeing the Greek word is a bit of a straw man. You are either working on reading Greek or not. Just my opinion.
Not sure why NRSV is not on your translation list, but it is an excellent, ecumenical, scholarly, ecclesiological translation that might should be on your list.
HTH

#4 knight777

knight777

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Accordance Version:10.x

Posted 01 July 2005 - 11:22 PM

David and Joe,

thank you so much for the feedback. I think I know which direction to start now. And Joe, the NRSV didn't make my list because its been a long week, I'm tired, and forgetful. Thanks for the reminder.

My wife reads Greek and will be helping me along, so my intent is more serious then just word look up. I don't expect Accordance to teach me Greek though.

Joe, would you mind sharing a little bit more on the Photo Guide and the Anchor Bible Dictionary?

Thanks! I really appreciate the thoughtful feedback.

#5 Joe Weaks

Joe Weaks

    Platinum

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,086 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Odessa, TX
  • Interests:I like things that are Orange, and possibly Blue.
  • Accordance Version:11.x

Posted 01 July 2005 - 11:54 PM

Since you wife reads Greek, then you should definitely go with some Greek tool(s). I've never even seen a Strong's module, so can't really comment there.

I don't know what to say about the Anchor Bible Dictionary. It is by far the most used/owned bible dictionary set among bible professers in the U.S. But, it's not like the Dictionary of Biblical Interpretation, focusing on the bible "academy". It is a huge (6 volume) work, and not really that old, still. Also, the ABD is much more historical/background and "atheological" in nature than the Zondervan or IVP stuff, and since you said that's what you asked for that's why I recommended it.

The Oak Tree folks did a great job on this Photo Guide... which includes small dictionary-like paragraphs on each place, but then a cast of photos. If you've been to ancient sites, you have come to appreciate seeing things. A picture even, though, is worth a thousand words to make the historical aspect of a place come alive.
You know, since the day I stood near old Capernaum and look out over the Sea of Tiberias, I've never read, "...and he got into the boat and went over to the other side" quite the same way.

If you're really into Archaeological pics, have a look at the BAR picture module too.

#6 BrianBowman

BrianBowman

    Member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 39 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Apex, NC
  • Interests:The Mysteries of Christ, Holy Scripture, Patristic and Catholic Theology, Guitar, Classical Pilates, Software Engineering, Craftsman Architecture
  • Accordance Version:8.x

Posted 02 July 2005 - 02:14 PM

I would definitely go with the Anchor Bible Dictionary instead of the IVP stuff (which is not top notch by many standards). I'll second the recommendation for Photo Guide... Photo Guide... Photo Guide.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


... just to add more "confusion" :) . I agree with Joe that from the standpoint of "pure scholarship" the Anchor Bible Dictionary is the way to go. However, I'll add this caveat. You should be aware that the scholarship provided in the ABD "runs the gamut" as far as Theological tradition goes. That is there are "liberal" points of view expressed, as well as "conservative" - depending upon who wrote the particular articles you are studying in the ABD. No one, even the most learned and "objective" scholar is without personal presuppositions and bias. If you're comfortable "sorting out" the gradients of thought and premise that scholars of various stripe have, then the ABD is probably without peer. However, if you just want solid "modern Evangelical" perspective, then the IVP stuff will probably satisfy you for a good while.

For what's it worth, I'm still waiting for permission from my wife to buy *both* of these excellent reference resources. ;) Right now, I'm content with the Hodge Theology, the Calvin stuff, and other great Reformed resources that come in the Accordance Standard-to-Premier modules, as well as the KB, BDAG, and KD.

... and yes, you can get a WHOLE BUNCH of $$$ tied up in Accordance real quick! But hey, it's the best Bible Software in the world, supported by some of the friendliest, most committed team of poeple I've encountered (ask Dr. Helen Brown how much she sleeps). In short, you can't go wrong with Accordance add-ons. "It's ALL GOOD"!


Brian

Edited by BrianBowman, 02 July 2005 - 02:17 PM.


#7 RPat

RPat

    Bronze

  • Active Members
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts

Posted 02 July 2005 - 02:18 PM

Greetings:

I might take a different approach, sort of a two stage approach. The first stage builds a foundation and then after a little research in a good University or Seminary library, you'll be able to buy the modules that fit your personal focus/goals.

Stage 1: Buy these initially...

a. Accordance 6 Introductory level
b. NASB as the "free" unlock
c. NRSV
d. NET (this is one of my favorites due to the translator and study notes)
e. Bible Land Photo Guide (don't have it, but everybody likes it; includes Bible references).
f. Eerdmans Bible Dictionary (its like a "mini-ABD" and up-to-date)
OPTIONAL
g. BAR Article Archive (Optional, but you'll probably want it at some time)
h. CJB or JPS (Optional: for more Jewish perspective on the OT & NT in the CJB)


Now, a little research time. If you can, go to a University or Seminary Library and look through the ABD (Anchor Bible Dictionary) and the IVP materials to see which has the focus you're looking for. The NBD, OT and NT background commentaries are good, but may not be what you're looking for. Since these all available in print you can get a good idea if they meet your requirements.

The one issue with the ABD is some of the articles assume you have a base in modern historical and biblical scholarship. It has no problem throwing words like "Heilsgeschite"; "Weltanshung", J, P, LBE, Elohist etc. around. If you love that level of reading, then its great! :D

Stage 2: Buy...
a. ABD
-- or --
a. IVP essential Collection
b. other translations as you need...
c. BAR article archive, if you didn't already

Hope this helps. I'm currently on the "monthly paycheck plan to Accordance". Fortuntately, I'm running out of things I really "need".

Blessings,

Rich

Edited by RPat, 02 July 2005 - 02:25 PM.


#8 knight777

knight777

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Accordance Version:10.x

Posted 02 July 2005 - 08:40 PM

wow... thanks for all the insight. My wife and I are putting together a package based on your feedback.

Which brings me to my last question. How does the licensing work on Accordance? Can my wife and I both use Accordance at home? She has a desktop and I have a laptop. We want this for personal study, meaning we're not teachers, pastors, etc... If we spend $500+ on study materials will the license allow both of us legal use of the software at home?

I tried to find the license terms on the site and I saw the site licensing, but that started at 3 computers and we have just two and are not an institution.

I develop web based content management systems, so I take licensing very seriously :) I hate when people steal from our company and I want to make sure we do the right thing by you guys.

Edited by knight777, 02 July 2005 - 08:42 PM.


#9 RPat

RPat

    Bronze

  • Active Members
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts

Posted 03 July 2005 - 12:26 AM

Generally, software (such as, PhotoShop, Office, etc.) can be installed on two computers (a home and a portable) as long as they are not used simultaneouly. The sticky wicket in your case is that there are actually two different people who want to use it, possibly at the same time.

I would send an e-mail to sales@accordancebible.com with your specific question. The team at Accordance is very prompt in replying.


Rich

#10 Pakeman

Pakeman

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 02 March 2006 - 11:48 PM

I am also new to Accordance, and have found this discussion very helpful.
I have recently purchased the Introductory Level and am considering which translation of the Bible to get as the additional version. Are there any versions that people particularly recommend?

At the moment, I am considering the Revised Standard Version or the New International Version, with the RSV the slight favourite since I have a real paper version of the NIV. I was wondering if there are any other versions I should be considering, and it seems that the New Standard Revised Version is recommended. However, that seems to be a revision of the ASV, included in my original package. Does the NRSV offer any significant advantage over the RSV, other than being easier to read? (Having been brought up on the KJV, ALL modern versions seem easy to digest. Even if they cannot tell a bearded darnel from a harmless weed.:))

Mark

#11 Charles Stock

Charles Stock

    Silver

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 179 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania
  • Accordance Version:9.x

Posted 03 March 2006 - 06:24 AM

If you are looking for mostly personal devotional study, rather than a deep scholarly approach and on a purely personal preference note, I would recommend the NIV-G/K because of the tagging to the Goodrick-Kohlenberger system, which allows the Instant Detail feature to give you a quick Greek or Hebrew background and links by clicking to the Greek and Hebrew dictionaries that ae part of the package. This puts a considerable amount of insight at your fingertips. It's definitely not original language research, but may open up some great "ah-hah" moments to an English language reader. If you want a more literal, word for word translation and don't like the "dyanamic equivalency" approach of the NIV translators, then the NRSV may please you more.

The NET is worth the price for the notes that accompany it, if you want one more recommendation.

Just one "caution:" the more you use Accordance, the more you may get totally addicted to Bible Study in general and Accordance in particular! :)

#12 Lorinda H. M. Hoover

Lorinda H. M. Hoover

    Platinum

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,377 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Iowa
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, Windows, iOS

Posted 04 March 2006 - 02:37 PM

The NRSV is a "revision" of the RSV, but it is my understanding that the entire text was translated from the original languages rather than just adjusting certain aspects of the RSV text. (One of my seminary professors was on the translation team).

Changes from the RSV include:
eliminating the "thou" language, since "thou" has dropped from English usage and the distinction is not present in the Greek & Hebrew
using inclusive terms for people when both men and women are assumed to be included in "generic" masculine nouns/pronouns of the original language
eliminating archaic terms and words/phrases whose meaning had altered. The example I remember is Paul's statement (I don't know chapter and verse off hand) "I once was stoned," which, of course, did not mean Paul was on drugs!

The NRSV has been my "base" translation since it came out, in part because it is the "standard" for my denomination. But there are times when I get frustrated with it because it will often use several different Engish words for the same Greek or Hebrew word in a given passage. This is usually done for English style reasons, but it can make it hard to track repeated words.

I recently got the NET Bible, and am enjoying the notes, even though I have found several places where I think more translators' notes would be helpful.

If you get the NIV, I would encourage you to spend the extra money on an option that gives you G/K numbers (one of the Zondervan packages does, I believe).

At the moment I have NRSV and NET, plus the "freebie" English Bibles that come with the Introductory level of version 6. NIV and REB are both on my list of future purposes, although some more original language resources have more priority for me. (I have Scholar's Core Collection, but want LXX as well)

Hope this helps,

Lorinda

Running Accordance on:
Mac 10.10 (Yosemite)
iOS 7 (iPad)
Windows Vista Home Premium


#13 curious_dan

curious_dan

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Accordance Version:Non-user

Posted 04 April 2006 - 06:58 PM

This is a great discussion. I too am looing at Accordance. I have tried some of the open source tools available and while they are not bad, they are not great.

Here is my dilema. I would, like the original poster, not like to spend more than I need. On the other hand I want to be sure that I do not end up spending more in the long run to save a few bucks now.

I'm interest in NIV, with the ability to do light study of the word origins and translation. I do not see myself having time, or the interest to properly learn greek,etc. I would also like to have the KJV to start, but to add other translations later as well as other texts, etc.


Having said that, here are my questions:
1) It sounds like the "Zondervan Essential Bible Study Suite for Macintosh" might be the way to go? Do you ree (based on the above)?
2) If I go with the Zondervan package, can I add to it later? Bibles, other texts, Photos, dictionairies, etc?
3) If I go with the Zondervan package, can I upgrade to Library 6 later or are these different product paths?
4) What are the limitations, if any with starting with the Zondervan package, with an eye towards future expansion?

OK - I sure have beat that question to death ;-). But you get the idea.


Thanks in advance for your replies.
Dan

#14 Helen Brown

Helen Brown

    Mithril

  • Admin
  • 8,511 posts
  • Twitter:accordancebible
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:heart in Israel
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, Windows, iOS

Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:10 PM

The Zondervan Essential is a good place to start if you want to base your study on the NIV. You can always add anything you want. The EBC, NIDNTT, and NIDOTTE are excellent tools which are unlockable on that CD.

Other add-ons may require another CD shipment, but, unlike some other software companies, we do not lock you into or out of anything. This does make Accordance seem complicated to buy, but it lets you have complete freedom to buy what you want when you want it, without pressure to get a big package up front in order to get big savings. You can add Library 6 later but there is no price break on it together with Z Essential. There is a little overlap in the content with Z Essential, but it is still excellent value with its choice of modern Bibles to add.

We actually encourage people to start small and add as they feel comfortable. The only thing to watch is not to pay for version 6 ahead of time if you intend to get Zondervan Essential, since that CD price includes the program, and we'll send you the code to download 6 when you order the Zondervan Essential in any case.
Helen Brown
OakTree Software

#15 Pakeman

Pakeman

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 04 April 2006 - 08:30 PM

Thank you for all the detail about NSRV. It was very helpful, and in the end that is what I chose to add to my collection.

Are there any plans to add prayer modules for Accordance? (Could not see any obvious ones in the list.)

I have Boyd and Meara's "Helps to Worship" (published in 1936) and a Japanese translation of John Baillie's equally old "A Diary of Private Prayer", but both use rather arcane language. Are there any other more modern alternatives, even if not Accordance modules?

#16 Lorinda H. M. Hoover

Lorinda H. M. Hoover

    Platinum

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,377 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Iowa
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, Windows, iOS

Posted 04 April 2006 - 10:44 PM

The one element that appears to be "missing" in the Zondervan package appears to be (Helen may correct me) the parallel texts which let you see the gospel's treatment of the same event side by side, or the Old testament passages next to the places in the NT where they are quoted. (See the Beginning in Mark guide on Context for more a better explanation).

I seem to remember that one (but not all) of the parallels is available as in a free starter pack that can be downloaded.

I think the least expensive way to get the all parallels in addition to the Zondervan package (which sounds like a good choice for what you describe as your needs) is to purchase the Introductory level of Library 6 (in addition to the Z package). This would add some more "public domain" Bible translations, and let you choose one more modern English translation of your choice.

Running Accordance on:
Mac 10.10 (Yosemite)
iOS 7 (iPad)
Windows Vista Home Premium


#17 curious_dan

curious_dan

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Accordance Version:Non-user

Posted 05 April 2006 - 08:01 AM

"Thank You" all for the feedback.

Helen, can you comment on the Zondervan package when reading more than one translation?


Or to put it another way, is the software the same? I figured it was just a logo change and different content for Zondervan (probably a bit simplistic).


Thanks.

P.S. - I'll take at NRSV.

#18 Helen Brown

Helen Brown

    Mithril

  • Admin
  • 8,511 posts
  • Twitter:accordancebible
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:heart in Israel
  • Accordance Version:11.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, Windows, iOS

Posted 05 April 2006 - 08:30 AM

Yes, it is the same Accordance software (6.8 actually) as you can see if you look at the details and modules on our website.
Helen Brown
OakTree Software




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users