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#1 David Lee

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 11:14 AM

I'm a new user of Accordance and I'm also a relatively new user of Macs.
Sometimes when I'm studying, I want to know why a particular Greek or Hebrew word was translated into a particular English word.
I have been spoiled by the "Look up in Dictionary" context menu that is in many applications (like TextEdit and Safari).

I'm copying into a widget for my Oxford definitions.
Have I missed something that would make this easier?

I thought I should post here before someone pointed out that my feature request was pointless. :)

#2 Helen Brown

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 11:21 AM

The NET Notes often comment on the choice of a word in the NET version. Both modules are included in the Core Bundle or the Library levels.
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#3 jpkang

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 12:42 PM

I'm copying into a widget for my Oxford definitions.
Have I missed something that would make this easier?

If you're wanting to look up English words in the OS X Dictionary app, the Services submenu is available in Accordance, so you can highlight the word, then navigate to Accordance > Services > Look Up in Dictionary (this works in most OS X applications).

To streamline, you can assign a keyboard shortcut to Look Up in Dictionary in your Keyboard & Mouse prefpane's Keyboard Shortcuts tab. If you find the Services submenu to be overpopulated, try Peter Maurer's very handy ServiceScrubber.

Of course, if you're looking for a semantic analysis, the best thing to do is to study a lexicon entry carefully (here BDAG and HALOT are often overkill, but they do present the largest amount of data) and see which part of the semantic range of a root or word a particular translator seems to have chosen.
J. P. Kang, Ph.D. (Bible)

#4 David Lee

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 01:03 PM

If you're wanting to look up English words in the OS X Dictionary app, the Services submenu is available in Accordance, so you can highlight the word, then navigate to Accordance > Services > Look Up in Dictionary (this works in most OS X applications).

To streamline, you can assign a keyboard shortcut to Look Up in Dictionary in your Keyboard & Mouse prefpane's Keyboard Shortcuts tab. If you find the Services submenu to be overpopulated, try Peter Maurer's very handy ServiceScrubber.

This what I'm looking for. Thank you.

Of course, if you're looking for a semantic analysis, the best thing to do is to study a lexicon entry carefully (here BDAG and HALOT are often overkill, but they do present the largest amount of data) and see which part of the semantic range of a root or word a particular translator seems to have chosen.

I'm less concerned with the thoughts of the translators than I am with getting the full meaning of the word used.
Sometimes the words with which we are most familiar mean more than we remember.

#5 jpkang

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 02:06 PM

This what I'm looking for. Thank you.
I'm less concerned with the thoughts of the translators than I am with getting the full meaning of the word used.
Sometimes the words with which we are most familiar mean more than we remember.

You are so right that words often mean more than we remember or realize!

Studying a good lexicon entry will help you get there, though often requiring patience to absorb!

For Greek, the Louw & Nida semantic domains lexicon of the NT (part of the Accordance Scholar's Core bundle) might be helpful, since it helps you see the larger relationships between words and parts of speech.

For Hebrew, the United Bible Society has the web-based Semantic Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew, but it is a little cumbersome to use at this time.
J. P. Kang, Ph.D. (Bible)




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