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#1 markusvonkaenel

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 06:49 AM

Yesterday i learnt about a translation difference in acts 18:21. KJV has one sentence more than the NIV, the same situation in german translations, Elberfelder has it not, s
Schlachter and Bruns have it. :(
Which tools do I need to solve and understand such issues? GNT from the German Bible Soc. or and other tools.

#2 Helen Brown

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 07:14 AM

Most of these issues are due to manuscript differences between the critical texts like NA27 as we have in our GNT-T, and the Textus Receptus/Majority/Byzantine texts. Just by comparing the Greek texts you will see that the critical texts omits some sentences that are only found in later MSS. The critical apparatus modules on the Studienbibel and NT Apparatus Cds will give you more details about the variants, but most of these major ones will be obvious with just the GNT-T and GNT-TR side by side.
Helen Brown
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#3 Robb Brunansky

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 07:27 AM

You also might consult Metzger's textual commentary on the Greek New Testament. In that particular module, Metzger gives the reason(s) why the committee of the critical text decided to include or omit certain words/phrases/sentences. That will give you at least a starting point to understand why the critical text (GNT-T, for example) is different than the TR. Depending on how deeply you want to delve into the issue, you might also consult a commentary on a given book to see if it deals with the variants. Word Biblical Commentary (on sale now for the unbeatable $399!!) usually discusses major variants and the author will give his reasons for including or omitting certain words. Metzger's book The Text of the New Testament: Its Transmission, Corruption, and Restoration is a good starting textbook for understanding how variants were introduced in the text and the generally accepted methodology to evaluate them.

Edited by Robb Brunansky, 18 June 2009 - 07:31 AM.

Soli Deo Gloria,
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#4 mikes

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 09:06 AM

Great suggestions from Robb (I need to pick up the Metzger resources myself) and nice succinct explanation from Helen.

If you are new to this whole discussion around how a "critical" translation of the bible is put together, and you're not a hardcore scholar, I have used "How We Got the Bible" in small groups to explore the subjects around how we got the bible translations we have today in a very accessible format (i.e. not a text, could be read in a weekend off quite easily, tells some engaging stories, etc.). There are plenty of very readable intros to this subject if you're not up to the Metzger text to start.

I recently picked up the printed book "New Testament Text and Translation Commentary" that does a FANTASTIC job for those of us lacking PhDs/ThMs by explaining almost any variant you will find between the major english translations (ESV, NIV, KJV, NKJV, NLT, NASB, NET, RSV, NRSV, TNIV, etc.). I have found it unique in this respect. No other single, compact resource seems to have both the variants in a readable format, AND which english translations use which variant! As a plus, it has a nice short intro that explains why we have variants, etc. that would function quite nicely for you until you have had the chance to go through Metzger or something shorter and more accessible.

IT WOULD BE FANTASTIC IF ACCORDANCE COULD GET THIS RESOURCE (yes I've requested it :) )

God bless your searching the scriptures! Feel free to ask more questions if you like. I don't have much in the way of German suggestions as my high school german has receded into the deepest recesses of my memory :)

#5 markusvonkaenel

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 02:49 AM

Thank you for the help, with this answers I found my solution. :)




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