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Greek study tools suggestions?


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#1 Robert Floyd

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 03:03 PM

I'd like to do a little more digging into the Greek text, but I'm by no means a scholar. I can sound out most Greek words and know a few of them, but have no formal training in Greek to speak of. However, I know the Strong's dictionary is not enough for what I'd like to do (look at the Greek in its context).

What would you recommend as a good tool or two for use with Accordance? I'd like to avoid spending more money than necessary. I'm torn between the Scholar's Package and the NIDNTT. If I can only get one, which would you suggest?

Also, my daughter is going to be taking a Greek class next fall. What Accordance tools would you recommend to help her in an introductory Greek class (she'll probably take two semesters for her major).

TIA,
Robert Floyd
Durham, NC

#2 jarcher

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 04:04 PM

Robert,

I would suggest the tagged GNT for sure and also recommend the Scholar's Package. That will supply you with most of what you need to do to get started. There are some lexicons included in the Scholar's Package that would be helpful. Also, BDAG would be helpful but the cost may prohibit you from purchasing it if you're on a close budge.

As a further recommendation you may be better off saving your money and buying a good Greek Grammar. Nothing can replace, not even Accordance, knowning the language itself.

Peace,

Jeremy

#3 Robb Brunansky

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 04:25 PM

Robert,

I would agree with Jeremy. You definitely need a tagged Greek text (GNT-T), and the best value for your money to get you started is the Scholar's Collection. You might add the tagged Septuagint as well, as I always find being able to seach that invaluable. If you have a choice between BDAG or NIDNTT, and your focus is more on English, you might find NIDNTT more helpful.

As for your daughter, she definitely needs the Scholar's Core Bundle, the tagged LXX, and BDAG would be really helpful. Hope this is helpful!

Robb Brunansky
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Soli Deo Gloria,
Robb Brunansky

#4 Helen Brown

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 08:35 PM

Robert:

It may surprise you to know that at OakTree we try hard not to push people to get packages and tools they do not need. Thus I do not agree with some of the above comments.

For yourself, only if you are very serious about studying Greek would I recommend a tagged Greek text. Certainly that can be used with little knowledge of the language, as it gives you instant access to the lexical form as well as the grammatical analysis and an English gloss. But, without knowledge of the language and grammar, it is doubtful that you can understand the significance of the parsing.

For most people who have not studied Greek I recommend investing in the mid-level Greek lexicons like NIDNTT and TDNT (or TWOT and NIDOTTE for Hebrew) in order to get in depth discussions of the different meanings and usages of the words themselves. The lexical forms are easy to find and automatically amplify from, in both Keyed English translations (KJVS, NAS95S or NIV-G/K) or the GNT-TRS (Textus Receptus with Strong's numbers).

If you do want to learn Greek, you may find helpful tools at www.teknia.com.

Your daughter should get the tagged Greek text, but does not need the Core Bundle unless she also plans to study Hebrew. You can just pay for Accordance, the Scholar's CD, and the Greek texts and tools that she selects, adding to them as necessary.
Helen Brown
OakTree Software

#5 Robert Floyd

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 09:30 PM

Robert:

It may surprise you to know that at OakTree we try hard not to push people to get packages and tools they do not need. Thus I do not agree with some of the above comments.

It doesn't surprise me in the least. From the few dealings I've had with OakTree, I would say you're an organization with integrity and customer satisfaction as core values. It will be a pleasure to spend my shekels with you.

For yourself, only if you are very serious about studying Greek would I recommend a tagged Greek text. Certainly that can be used with little knowledge of the language, as it gives you instant access to the lexical form as well as the grammatical analysis and an English gloss. But, without knowledge of the language and grammar, it is doubtful that you can understand the significance of the parsing.

For most people who have not studied Greek I recommend investing in the mid-level Greek lexicons like NIDNTT and TDNT (or TWOT and NIDOTTE for Hebrew) in order to get in depth discussions of the different meanings and usages of the words themselves. The lexical forms are easy to find and automatically amplify from, in both Keyed English translations (KJVS, NAS95S or NIV-G/K) or the GNT-TRS (Textus Receptus with Strong's numbers).

Thanks for the advice. The more I look at the NIDNTT, the more I like the thought of owning it. TDNT looks like major overkill for me (besides, it's not an Accordance module, is it?). I may also pick up the keyed NIV (a shame that's not one of the choices on the standard English Bible CD-ROM; is it possible you may move it there in the future?).

If you do want to learn Greek, you may find helpful tools at www.teknia.com.

I checked out that site. It looks like Greek for the Rest of Us would be a good choice for me.

Your daughter should get the tagged Greek text, but does not need the Core Bundle unless she also plans to study Hebrew. You can just pay for Accordance, the Scholar's CD, and the Greek texts and tools that she selects, adding to them as necessary.

Thank you for that suggested strategy. I'll definitely keep that in mind when I buy Accordance. BTW, what are the rules for a student discount? I don't think there are enough Macs at Harding for them to get the institutional discount. Is there a program for individual student?

Thanks to everyone who has offered suggestions. Please keep on giving me advice. This is one area where I need it.

Robert Floyd
Durham, NC




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