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Archaeological Study Bible


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#1 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 10:55 AM

Looking for a convenient introduction to biblical archaeology? Consider Zondervan's Archaeological Study Bible. With 8000 study notes, 500 articles, 500 color photographs and 15 maps, this resource is a goldmine of information. This podcast reviews this new module and shows how to set up a custom workspace to use it to its fullest advantage. Archaeological Study Bible

Edited by Timothy Jenney, 12 January 2011 - 10:56 AM.

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#2 Helen Brown

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 11:49 AM

We've extendd the sale on this item until Jan 20th.
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#3 Robert B Johnson

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 03:11 PM

We've extendd the sale on this item until Jan 20th.


I have the print edition. Can I turn it in for credit? Posted Image

I am sinner, saved by Grace. Soli Deo gloria.


#4 David Lang

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 05:39 PM

I have the print edition. Can I turn it in for credit? Posted Image



Maybe you could sell it to a gym for use in an exercise program! ;)
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#5 R. Mansfield

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 04:45 PM

Tim, in watching your podcast, I noticed that you mentioned some of the criticisms that had been leveled against the Archaeological Study Bible when it was first released. One of the issues not mentioned is the claim of numerous factual errors and misspellings that were in the first printing. One of the most blatant errors in the first printing was the fact that Rosetta Stone was pictured upside down. I wrote about this in my 2006 review of the ASB, and then reported it to a contact I had at Zondervan.

In the second printing of the ASB, the Rosetta Stone had been turned right side up, but this time, they reversed the picture, making it a mirror image of how it actually looks. I also alerted Zondervan to this, but have not looked at a print copy since to see if it was corrected.

Having bought the Accordance version of the ASB today, I happened to notice that the Rosetta Stone in the Accordance module follows the same error of the first printing in placing the Rosetta Stone upside down:

Attached File  Screen shot 2011-01-15 at 4.12.47 PM.png   526.99KB   16 downloads


This can verified simply by comparing the ASB image to that in other Accordance modules such as the PhotoGuide, BAR Archive, and ZIBBCNT (interestingly, the BAR archive contains one image of the Rosetta Stone in mirror image, although they have it displayed correctly in another location).

This made me wonder whether the Kindle edition of the ASB had the same mistake. I didn't want to pay for the ASB a second time (third time if I count my original purchase of the print edition), so I downloaded the free sample. Here, they display the image correctly:

Attached File  photo2.PNG   543.29KB   13 downloads

That makes me wonder if Zondervan simply gave Oak Tree an older etext rather than the one most up to date?

In re-reading the comments of my original review, one reader pointed out numerous misspellings in the initial publication of the ASB such as spelling William Hallo's name as Hallow. The spelling is correct in the Accordance module, so the issue of the Rosetta Stone seems to be a mystery.

Before anyone says so, I realize that simply pointing out an error in the text should be emailed to Helen privately, but I do find publication issues of this particular sort to be interesting--a kind of modern textual criticism--so I thought I would mention it here for sake of discussion.
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#6 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 08:41 PM

[Chuckle]

This is great, Rick!

No, I didn't read any reviews that mentioned these kinds of mistakes. Sounds like Zondervan (or the ASB editors themse1ves) needed a better copy editor. I have published myself—and know just how difficult it is to produce perfect copy without multiple proofreaders.

FWIW, I frequently find similar errors in most of the books I read.
Blessings,
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#7 David Lang

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 09:03 PM

Tim,

I have to wonder about the misspelling "themse1ves" in your last post. Did you do that on purpose to be ironic? Or did you unintentionally prove your own point about the difficulty of copy-editing?
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David Lang
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#8 R. Mansfield

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 09:05 PM

Tim,

I have to wonder about the misspelling "themse1ves" in your last post. Did you do that on purpose to be ironic? Or did you unintentionally prove your own point about the difficulty of copy-editing?


Or does it betray that Tim learned how to type on a typewriter in which the lowercase "l" and "1" were the same key? I've seen a few of those.
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#9 CWW

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 12:01 AM

This may be a bit off-topic and apologise if it is so. But in the podcast, Dr J mentioned that study bibles were like multi-function pocket knives whereas Accordance was like having a whole tool chest.

That got me wondering - I can understand having print study bibles because we can have a range of helps quickly to hand in a single volume. But with bible software on portable devices, we can have whole dictionaries, commentaries, etc - who is the intended user of study bibles in electronic form? Initially, I used the Life Application and ESV study bibles quite frequently in Accordance for devotional reading but also very quickly found myself wanting more and going on to the other tools and resources I have available. I seldom refer to the study bibles now. So really, why have study bibles in e-form when we have access to so much more?

May His peace be with you,
Wei

PS - Thanks again Dr J for all the podcasts. I always enjoy them and look forward to each new episode.

#10 jfidel

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 07:45 AM

First of all this is a great question and Dr. J can probably answer it much better than me.

I see Study Bibles offering the following benefits:

1. Many are specialized in focus. Thematic SB lets you follow a theme based upon the verse that is in focus; Apologetic SB focuses on apologetics; Life Application.. application; Archeological SB ... so you can purchase a relatively inexpensive volume that will allow for specialized focus to start your study. I setup a commentary pane and will often click through these specialized SB's to see if I want/need to dig deeper in specific areas.
2. Study Bibles are very useful on iPad/Phone/Pod because they provide so much in one resource, which is really useful given the limitations of the smaller screens and number of windows currently available. (Having the ESVS xref and notes separate is not as functional on the IOS app however)
3. As new customers come over from the IOS app, this is a great entry point for a base desktop package. Many new users of the free IOS app may not be as focused on original languages and critical study of the texts, so a Study Bible would be a great starting point for them.

Just a few ways I find Study Bibles useful in digital form.

#11 David Lang

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 12:24 PM

This question of why electronic study Bibles inspired today's post on the Accordance blog. Be sure to check it out.
Sincerely,
David Lang
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#12 CWW

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Posted 20 January 2011 - 07:14 AM

Thanks David. I liked the blog. EBC or Tyndale serve that quick reference purpose for me now. But I certainly appreciate the "less is more" to not get side-tracked off the text and into the tools.
:)
Wei

#13 CWW

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Posted 20 January 2011 - 07:18 AM

First of all this is a great question and Dr. J can probably answer it much better than me.

I see Study Bibles offering the following benefits:

1. Many are specialized in focus. Thematic SB lets you follow a theme based upon the verse that is in focus; Apologetic SB focuses on apologetics; Life Application.. application; Archeological SB ... so you can purchase a relatively inexpensive volume that will allow for specialized focus to start your study. I setup a commentary pane and will often click through these specialized SB's to see if I want/need to dig deeper in specific areas.
2. Study Bibles are very useful on iPad/Phone/Pod because they provide so much in one resource, which is really useful given the limitations of the smaller screens and number of windows currently available. (Having the ESVS xref and notes separate is not as functional on the IOS app however)


I take both these points as well especially with only 2 panes on the smaller screens.
Cheers, Wei.




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