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#1 danzac

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 11:16 AM

Just a note that the possessive pronoun, when searched as [PRONOUN possessive] finds nothing. They can only be found when searching it as an adjective.

#2 Elijah

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 05:33 AM

This is an old post, but does someone know why this is the case? Why allow the user to select Pronoun when it doesn't find anything. Or are there other uses for [PRONOUN ...] ?



#3 luoar

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 05:45 AM

If you do this search using the construct you will see that it says there that subclasses are not used in all Greek texts. See attachment. 



#4 Ken Simpson

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:22 AM

It is interesting, because the possessive pronoun is the possessive adjective (see Wallace)

 

F. Possessive “Pronouns” (= Adjectives)

 

1. Definition and Terms Used 

 

Greek does not have a distinct possessive pronoun. Instead, it usually employs either the possessive adjective (ἐμός, σός, ἡμέτερος, ὑμέτερος)90 or the genitive of the personal pronoun.91 The one lexicalizes possession (i.e., the notion of possession is part of the lexical root); the other grammaticalizes possession (i.e., the notion of possession is part of the inflection). No detailed treatment needs to be given since (a) possessive pronoun is not a bona fide Greek category, and ( B) the notion of possession can be examined either via the lexicon or other sections of this grammar. p348.


Edited by Ken Simpson, 02 March 2013 - 06:22 AM.

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#5 Ken Simpson

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 03:49 PM

I didn't notice when I posted that ( b ) was turned into the smiley face  B). Mr Wallace does not use emoticons in his excellent intermediate Greek text. Some may say that is a little sad, but I just wanted to set the record straight.


Edited by Ken Simpson, 02 March 2013 - 03:50 PM.

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#6 luoar

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 11:48 PM

That is most unfortunate Ken. When I saw the emoticon I thought to myself: this is the grammar I need to get for myself.



#7 Ken Simpson

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 12:28 AM

I agree rari,

that would be a very cool grammar that had emoticons - especially one like that!


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#8 Julie Falling

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 04:41 PM

The grammar is worth owning even without the emoticons!  We used the abbreviated version, The Basics of New Testament Syntax, for Greek 2, and "Big Wallace" was required for Greek 3 (second time around - I took it twice from a total of 3 professors).

 

His explanations and examples are great.  One of the profs felt he made too many distinctions between different uses, but, as a student, I would rather have more detail than less.  I still refer to it almost daily.


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#9 Ken Simpson

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:15 PM

Hi Julie, as a Greek reader of some years (though not of Prof Wallace's expertise) I think the observation is probably true. However, from a didactic point of view, the distinctions serve a very important function in that they help the student broaden the categories they see the word/tense/aspect/case etc functioning in, (and very occasionally narrow it).

 

So while it may be true, the text is (IMHO) excellent. 


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