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NIDNTT with NASB?


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#1 David Hamilton

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 04:30 PM

I'm looking for a good dictionary / lexicon of Greek words for a non-Greek student. From a previous post and looking at the modules I see that the New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology looks like a good option.

I have the NIV, but not the tagged NIV. I tend to use the tagged NASB. However the NIDNTT uses a different tagging system, yes? Does that mean I won't be able to triple-click a word in the NASB and have it show up the definition in NIDNTT? If that's the case, then what is another good dictionary / lexicon which *will* work with the tagged NASB?

Thanks!
David

#2 Charles Stock

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 06:20 PM

Hi David,

I don't know if this will seem to complicated to you, but you can easily use both the NAS95S and the NIDNTT together if you use a workspace with tabs. It involves two extra steps.

1. Let's say you are in Hebrews 6.20 and triple click on "forerunner." Instantly the NAS Greek would open up and show you this:
4274. pro/dromoß (but in Helena, which won't show up here just by copy and paste) prodromos; from 4390; a running forward, going in advance: —forerunner(1).

2. At the bottom right hand is a small window (the name of which I forget) that shows the Greek word. Highlight and copy it.

3. Click on the NIDNTT Tab and paste the Greek word prodomos in the top entry pane. Hit OK and it will take you to the article that includes this: <NOTE: you can also chose "English Entry" and simple type in "forerunner."

dromos, course, is used of a race in 2 Tim. 4:7, of Paul’s career and work as an apostle which is also compared with a fight; cf. Acts 13:25, of the course of John the Baptist’s life; Acts 20:24, of the course of Paul’s life, his sole object being to complete his ministry. prodromos, forerunner, occurs only at Heb. 6:20, where Jesus is seen as a forerunner on our behalf, having become a high priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek. In the context, he has entered the inner sanctuary, i.e. the immediate presence of God, which is here pictured under the symbolism of the day of atonement ritual, according to which the high priest entered on behalf of the people annually (Lev. 16; Tent; Temple). By being a priest after the order of Melchizedek, Jesus belongs to an order superior to that of the Levitical high priests, who were mortal men who had to perform the rite annually. Christ’s priesthood is unique; his priestly work requires no repetition.

4. You could also just change the NAS Greek in the top left tab to NIDNTT, but then it would keep opening up a new NAS Greek tab.

Maybe there's an easier way and someone will answer this and help us both out.

Blessings!

#3 Helen Brown

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 06:32 PM

Yes, there is a much easier way: from any text with Key numbers such as NAS96S, just press option when you select NIDNTT after you select a word, and NIDNTT will find the Greek word behind the English word you have selected. It does not use the Key numbers except as a way to get to the Greek word, so it does not matter that the numbering schemes are different.

So any Greek lexicon will work with any Key number text, and NIDNTT is an excellent choice.
Helen Brown
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#4 David Hamilton

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 08:11 PM

Thanks to you both!

David

#5 john mcgranaghan

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 08:13 AM

Yes, there is a much easier way: from any text with Key numbers such as NAS96S, just press option when you select NIDNTT after you select a word, and NIDNTT will find the Greek word behind the English word you have selected. It does not use the Key numbers except as a way to get to the Greek word, so it does not matter that the numbering schemes are different.

So any Greek lexicon will work with any Key number text, and NIDNTT is an excellent choice.


In Eph 1.10 selecting 'summing' in NAS95S returns a 'this word doesn't appear in the tool NIDNTT' error box.
Is there a way to get around this?

Thanks a bunch,

john

#6 Helen Brown

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 02:20 PM

Yes, but in this instance it is a little complicated!

First the problem:
The NAS95 agrees with the GNT-T in deriving this word from anakephalaioo (to sum up), which agrees with BDAG, but NIDNTT decides it is derived from anakephalaioomai (presumably the deponent form of the same verb). So NIDNTT has no entry for anakephalaioo, and anakephalaioomai is with kephale under the English entry Head.

So, how could you find the entry when the word it different?

I found it first by triple-clicking summing in NAS95S and seeing this entry in NAS Greek:
346. anakephalaioo anakephalaioo; from 303 and 2775; to sum up, gather up: —summed up(1), summing up(1).

Then I clinked the link to 2775 and got this entry:
2775. kephalaioo kephalaioo; from a dim. of 2776; to strike on the head: —wounded in the head(1).

Then I selected kephalaioo and clicked on NIDNTT to find the entry:
kephale G3051 (kephaleœ), head; anakephalaioomai G368 (anakephalaioomai), sum up, recapitulate.
with full discussion at the end of that article.

Other ways to do it would be to try selecting summing and amplifying to NIDNTT (no joy in this case), or to click the verse reference and amplify to NIDNTT to find all the references to this verse. It turns out there are 17, and using the Mark button I quickly reached #4, the correct one.

You see that there is more than one way to skin a cat. I hope this is helpful.
Helen Brown
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#7 john mcgranaghan

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 02:45 PM

Yes, but in this instance it is a little complicated!

First the problem:
The NAS95 agrees with the GNT-T in deriving this word from anakephalaioo (to sum up), which agrees with BDAG, but NIDNTT decides it is derived from anakephalaioomai (presumably the deponent form of the same verb). So NIDNTT has no entry for anakephalaioo and anakephalaioomai is with kephale under the English entry Head.


You see that there is more than one way to skin a cat. I hope this is helpful.



Thanks Helen. Skinning a cat may be more or less time consuming--depending upon the cat.

It works fine with 'Thayers'. I'll settle for that!

:)

john




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