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#1 arcanemuse

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:59 AM

I have been pulling my hair out trying to decide on which Carta package to buy. I was all set on the Scholar's and perhaps buying two others for a bit over 50 a piece. Then I have shifted in my mind to going with the Select combo and adding the Omnasticon. What is the difference between the Sacred Bridge and the Bible Atlas? I've read varying reports about this. Some say that the Sacred Bridge is just an expanded version of the Bible Atlas. That is the predominant viewpoint in my research. I've talked to two sales reps now on the phone that really don't know anything about the Carta resources. They were both very nice and wanting to help as much as they could but just didn't know enough to answer my questions. I'm trying to come to a decision here before the sale ends. I am also waiting until the first of the month for the new sales specials that will be coming out so I can just do one big huge order. If anyone knows the true difference it will save me some cash. By doing the Select and the Omnasticon, I basically will get all of the things I wanted with the addition of the Bible Atlas, so it will pretty much end up costing me about 50 dollars more that way. Also, what can anyone tell me about the Omnasticon? I've read that it will be a truly valuable resource to have and I've also read a couple of reviews that say it isn't all that great. I've done as much as I can on my own to try to sift through this and thought I had pretty much arrived at the perfect solutions with the Scholar's and adding the two resources but now I am just not so positive. Can anyone shed light on this? Thanks in advance!
God Bless,
Rick

#2 Steve King

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 05:41 AM

I do not have the Omnasticon so I cannot enlighten you on that but I do have the Sacred Bridge and the Bible Atlas. My personal view is that Sacred Bridge is not really an expanded Bible Atlas. The word expanded gives you the idea that what you get in the Sacred Bridge is exactly what you get in the Atlas but there is more of it. In fact to me they are different beasts.

The Macmillan Bible Atlas is more focussed on the biblical story (although not just the biblical story, it does include the intertestamental period and the the later revolts against Rome). It's narrative is focussed on the events that happened. Therefore it is a fairly straightforward historical atlas of the Bible and Israel. With lots of maps about biblical events.

The Sacred Bridge is much more scholarly and focussed on the Levant. It covers the same period but interacts with sources and is useful for seeing the biblical events in the broader picture. So whereas the Bible Atlas will have a chapter on Judah after the fall of Samaria the Sacred Bridge will have a chapter on the Sixth and Seventh centuries of which Judah is a part. It has plenty of maps but it is more difficult to home in on the ones focussed on purely biblical events.

In general the Atlas focusses on Biblical events and moves out to other significant events that were relevant whereas the Sacred Bridge shows the significant events of the area and then where biblical events fit into that. Therefore it is much easier to find maps for specific biblical events in the Bible Atlas. I can look at the chapter headings of the Macmillan Bible Atlas and pretty much get to what I want from there. That is not so easy in the Sacred Bridge.

The other difference between the two is that the Sacred Bridge has more sumptuous maps and illustrations. The maps in the Bible atlas are essentially two toned but the Sacred Bridge fully coloured. (See examples attached - should be obvious which is which)

Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 10.35.37.png   499.97KB   53 downloads
Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 10.35.58.png   548.29KB   60 downloads
Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 10.36.58.png   584.24KB   63 downloads
Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 10.37.13.png   636.64KB   61 downloads

This is my view, others may disagree, but hope this helps.

(Seems to have got extra thumbnails after editing for some reason!)

Attached Files


Edited by Steve King, 30 November 2012 - 05:57 AM.

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#3 arcanemuse

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:14 AM

That helps, thanks! It does appear that the Sacred Bridge is the more scholarly of the two with nicer graphics but if I read what you say correctly, the Atlas more corresponds with Biblical events where the Sacred Bridge lines up with historical events in general. It does seem that having both of them is not in the least overly redundant and that the two would well complement each other. Perhaps the Select is the way to go here. I could always add the Omnasticron to the mix. That would give me all the resources that I was thinking to the cream of the crop in all aspects.
God Bless,
Rick

#4 Alistair

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:35 AM

I've been quite confused by the array of materials offered by Carta. Steve's post above is incredibly helpful.
Above all I would expect an atlas to have great maps without huge swathes of explantory text.

I have commented previously elsewhere that products for Accordance are offered as if everybody is already familiar with them, and that more should be done to provide the potential purchaser with the key information.
And more than one small screenshot of the module!
Graphical resources should have details about the size and resolution of the images.

If you want me to buy your stuff then you should make more of an effort to sell it to me, and especially if it isn't a product I am familiar with already.

HTH

#5 jfidel

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:47 AM

This may also be helpful to you... it is a Lighting the Lamp dedicated to discussing these resources:
http://www.accordanc...tails/?id=82853
Dr J does a good job of explaining the various modules.

#6 Steve King

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:51 AM

The Atlas certainly has a much 'simpler' outline and a more straightforward and simpler outline narrative. I've added a some examples of the text/contents to give you a flavour.

Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 12.40.22.png   303.62KB   36 downloads
Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 12.40.38.png   252.51KB   52 downloads
Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 12.42.53.png   266.29KB   50 downloads
Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 12.43.12.png   376.73KB   35 downloads

#7 Tony Lawrence

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:03 AM

I do not have the Omnasticon so I cannot enlighten you on that but I do have the Sacred Bridge and the Bible Atlas. My personal view is that Sacred Bridge is not really an expanded Bible Atlas. The word expanded gives you the idea that what you get in the Sacred Bridge is exactly what you get in the Atlas but there is more of it. In fact to me they are different beasts.

The Macmillan Bible Atlas is more focussed on the biblical story (although not just the biblical story, it does include the intertestamental period and the the later revolts against Rome). It's narrative is focussed on the events that happened. Therefore it is a fairly straightforward historical atlas of the Bible and Israel. With lots of maps about biblical events.

The Sacred Bridge is much more scholarly and focussed on the Levant. It covers the same period but interacts with sources and is useful for seeing the biblical events in the broader picture. So whereas the Bible Atlas will have a chapter on Judah after the fall of Samaria the Sacred Bridge will have a chapter on the Sixth and Seventh centuries of which Judah is a part. It has plenty of maps but it is more difficult to home in on the ones focussed on purely biblical events.

In general the Atlas focusses on Biblical events and moves out to other significant events that were relevant whereas the Sacred Bridge shows the significant events of the area and then where biblical events fit into that. Therefore it is much easier to find maps for specific biblical events in the Bible Atlas. I can look at the chapter headings of the Macmillan Bible Atlas and pretty much get to what I want from there. That is not so easy in the Sacred Bridge.

The other difference between the two is that the Sacred Bridge has more sumptuous maps and illustrations. The maps in the Bible atlas are essentially two toned but the Sacred Bridge fully coloured. (See examples attached - should be obvious which is which)

Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 10.35.37.png   499.97KB   53 downloads
Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 10.35.58.png   548.29KB   60 downloads
Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 10.36.58.png   584.24KB   63 downloads
Attached File  Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 10.37.13.png   636.64KB   61 downloads

This is my view, others may disagree, but hope this helps.

(Seems to have got extra thumbnails after editing for some reason!)


I want to add my agreement to Steve's assessment above with a couple additional thoughts. First, if one uses these maps in Powerpoint/Keynote presentations then the maps in Sacred Bridge display much better on screen. The lack of contrast in the MacMillian Bible Atlas maps make them very difficult to see (and thus unusable). Second, it is easy to open Sacred Bridge and search for Scripture references (for instance searching on Acts 2 will allow one to find the map The Pentecost Experience). So, while scholarly written, do not underestimate the value of the maps, illustrations, and photos in Sacred Bridge.

One additional point, if you have the Essential IVP Reference Collection V.2 package it comes with the New Bible Atlas. Its really pretty good and has some excellent illustrations (such as the one on p 26 of a Tell).

Hope that offers some additional help.
Tony Lawrence
biblelandphotos.org

#8 Rick Bennett

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 11:25 AM

I noticed, quite surprisingly, that Sacred Bridge does not have any reviews on our product page. Would one of you (Steve or Tony?) mind helping future customers out by adding one (even if copying the above comments)?

Rick Bennett
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