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Learning spoken Hebrew


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#21 Robert Holmstedt

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:35 AM

Certainly. I use most of the songs from the album below in my class, as well as some from the Nancy Linder album. Unfortunately, while I bought the Serenade album on CD 10 years ago, I can no longer find it online. 

 

http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/B0047GUO72

 

http://www.jewishsto...rodID=SWP-NYLR1

 

Beyond this, I've enjoyed an eclectic mix (often recommended my students or friends) of, e.g., David Broza, Idan Reichel, Ivri Lider, Achinoam Nini, and enjoy browsing youtube for interesting new Israeli songs.


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Dept. of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
The University of Toronto
blog: ancienthebrewgrammar.wordpress.com

#22 James Tucker

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 03:34 PM

Interesting, I didn't realize that they were making ArtScroll materials into a Digital format (as found following the Jewish Store link above > Software).



#23 Elijah

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:32 PM

@Robert: Thank you so much. Those artists were a good starting point. They led me to Miri Mesika and Oi Va Voi and others...



#24 Bobert

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:06 PM

I'm a little shocked to see that no one has mentioned Randall Buth and the Biblical Language Center.  I attended the Biblical Hebrew ulpan in Jerusalem two years ago and my reading skills (TRUE reading skills, by the way, see this article - http://www.biblicall...-comprehension/) blossomed.  Listening to recorded texts is a great start, but actually using the language will do more for reading comprehension than just about anything else.  


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#25 Elijah

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:12 AM

I'm a little shocked to see that no one has mentioned Randall Buth and the Biblical Language Center.  I attended the Biblical Hebrew ulpan in Jerusalem two years ago and my reading skills (TRUE reading skills, by the way, see this article - http://www.biblicall...-comprehension/) blossomed.  Listening to recorded texts is a great start, but actually using the language will do more for reading comprehension than just about anything else.  

 

I'm thinking about taking one those immersive courses (there is also polisjerusalem.org). Did you know some Modern Hebrew before you took the course? My concern with only learning Biblical Hebrew would be that

 - if you are in Israel you wouldn't be able to talk to people because there are some difference between Biblical and Modern Hebrew. 

 - you cannot use the vast Modern Hebrew resources (like music, movies, news, ...)



#26 Bobert

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:36 AM

Elias,

 

I knew no modern Hebrew before taking the course, but after taking it I learned a good deal through in class comparisons of biblical Hebrew and modern Hebrew.  If your goal, however, is to learn modern Hebrew, Hebrew University offers a year long modern Hebrew ulpan.  Dr. Holmstedt was in that program, I believe.  



#27 Robert Holmstedt

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 03:07 PM

Any option (modern Hebrew, Buth's biblical ulpan) is good, as long as the student keeps in mind that there are some important semantic (esp. verbal system) and lexical differences between stages of Hebrew. They are not difficult to sort out, though. Whatever it takes to move one from word-by-word translating to reading/thinking/producing with comprehension -- it's all beneficial. For example, before Randall Buth started offering his ulpan or developed his materials, how did he learn? He read lots and lots of Bible and learned Israeli Hebrew fluently. 

 

There are ulpanim all over in Israel for those with the time, funds, and interest -- the Rothberg Institute at Hebrew Univ in Jerusalem, Haifa, Ben-Gurion in Beer-Sheva, etc. Or there is Buth's ulpan, which sounds fun. Whatever the choice, the largest issue is, as Bobert says, getting to the point where the interaction in the language is not just passive (i.e., reading, which typically means translating) but is active (speaking, writing, singing). 


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Dept. of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
The University of Toronto
blog: ancienthebrewgrammar.wordpress.com

#28 luoar

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 09:34 PM

I cannot resist responding to the comments about Lambdin above. I agree that his introductory textbook on Hebrew has a number of quirks, not least of which the way is he introduces students to the language via transliteration. However, his work still remains one of the best, if not the best in a cluttered field of competing grammars, many of which treat new students of the language as idiots. Aside from being an introductory grammar I have also found Lambdin to be a highly useful quick reference resource.

 

In terms of a thorough and solid grounding there are few that rival Lambdin who answers questions most leave unanswered, and whose exercises are superior to those found in other grammars. The lessons are short with lots of exercises (as opposed to long lessons and short exercises). It is not the easiest Hebrew Grammar out there, but there is little doubt in my mind that it is the best. A particular strength of Lambdin's grammar is his attention to syntax. His discussions on Hinneh and conjunctive/disjunctive Waw were pioneering and are still cited in other more advanced Hebrew grammars. Finally, it would be remiss to speak of Lambdin without mention of the key lovingly prepared by HGM Williamson (Annotated Key to Lambdin's Introduction to Biblical Hebrew (Old Testament Guides). This key is an outstanding work in its own right, with Williamson not only providing answers, but adding clear and helpful comments about aspects of Hebrew grammar relevant to the exercises.

 

In my view then the student of Hebrew will greatly benefit from Lambdin for the following reasons: a) it offers the best exercises of any Hebrew grammar out there B) it has the best answer key to any Hebrew grammar c) Lambdin has an uncanny knack for answering questions thoughtful students might ask d) the writing is marvellously clear (most of the time) e) the definitions provided of Hebrew words are highly accurate. Yes, its tough getting though it (Robert's OY is relevant at the this point) but it is worth it in the long run.    


Edited by luoar, 13 February 2013 - 09:38 PM.


#29 JackiPowell

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 11:27 PM

Shalom,

 

No one has posted to this in a few months, but I just read through the posts today for the first time as a new member.  I have been a Hebrew student for several years, first modern Hebrew and then Biblical.  However ALL of my teachers have been Israeli's and I have never taken a seminary course in Hebrew.  I have learned what I know (I am still very much a student!)  from "The People of the Book".  I would like to pass on some general adivce to those who really want to learn to SPEAK or READ the T'nakh (or Modern Hebrew).  I write from many years of personal experience and much blood, sweat and tears:

 

1) I would NEVER recommend any student to use transliteration in any form or fashion.  I used it in the beginning and it GREATLY DELAYED my ability to learn to read the actual Hebrew letters.  An English speaker will automatically look to the letters that your mind knows (ie, the transliteration) instead of the Hebrew.  It becomes a huge "crutch".  Transliteration is hardly ever correct!  If you say the Hebrew word the way it is transliterated with Latin letters, you will be saying it incorrectly 90% of the time.  If you truly want to learn Hebrew, then stick with Hebrew letters from the start.  This is how Hebrew is taught in the Ulpan in Israel.  No transliteration there.

 

2) For the reading of the Hebrew T'nakh, there is none better than Shlomo Bertonov.  He is Israeli and his voice is the "voice of the T'nakh" like Alexander Scourby is the voice of the KJV. 

 

3) The http://www.mechon-ma...rg/p/pt/pt0.htm website is also good to hear (and free).  However the Hebrew text itself has lots of errors in it.  It is not the Masoretic text.  It has lots of added punctuation marks that make no sense.  We use it in Hebrew class and my teacher constantly complains about the weird punctuation.

 

4) Yes, use any method to try to HEAR Hebrew.  Watch Hebrew movies with subtitles, listen to songs!!  That is how we learn our 'mother tongue' as a child - by hearing our parents and others.  We don't learn English grammer at age 1 and 2, etc. but most kids begin to speak by age 2.  It is better to immerse and learn Hebrew and then latter you can learn the grammar rules.

 

5) Another great source is two newspapers printed bi-weekly in Israel.  One called "Bereshit" - is the 'Easy Hebrew newspaper for beginners'.  The website is www.hebrewtoday.com.  You have to subscribe and you can receive your newspaper online, or in printed form.  Also, you can pay extra and get a CD with all the articles read out loud by Israeli's - native Hebrew speakers.  You must hear Israeli's speaking Hebrew - not Americans.  I am not affiliated with this newspaper, but I do subscribe to it and use it.  You also learn about culture and current events from Israel - which is also part of truly learning Hebrew.  You cannot learn any language without also learning the culture of the people who speak it. 

 

6) I can't emphasize how important it is to HEAR the Hebrew.  Remember modern Hebrew speakers do not use vowels at all.  They just know how the word is said - from hearing it.  Think of all the English words whose pronounciation completely breaks the English phonetic rules.  You basically need to hear someone saying the words to know how to pronounce them.  The Torah scroll has no vowels and no punctuation marks, but the correct reading is known from hearing it down through the years.  Of course the printed Masoretic text had the vowels added.

 

7) I learned Modern Hebrew in live classes with Israeli teachers.  I now take Biblical Hebrew online through eTeacher.com.  The teachers are also Israeli.  The focus of eTeacher is to teach the Hebrew and not necessarily the Bible.  I have had a very good expereince with it for the past three years and highly recommend it as a student - I am a student and take both Hebrew and Aramaic.   eTeacher also provides FREE weekly online webinars in both Modern and Biblical Hebrew every Thursday night.  Modern at 7pm and Biblical at 8pm Eastern time.  These webinars are both taught by Israeli's and you will spead two hours each week HEARING Hebrew.  These are completely free.  Read about it here: http://eteacherbiblical.com/webinar  You will learn so much and I really recommend these.

 

Hebrew is the most beautiful language in the world and all the hard work to learn it is well worth it! 

שלום


Jacki Powell

Light for Israel

P.O. Box 80652

Charleston, SC 29416

www.sdhs.co.uk

פֵּ֖תַח דְּבָרֶ֥יךָ יָאִ֗יר


#30 Alistair

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 08:23 PM

Hebrew is the most beautiful language in the world and all the hard work to learn it is well worth it! 

 

Oddly enough my Hebrew teacher said that Welsh was the the most beautiful language in the world, apparently it is "the language of heaven."  :)



#31 Timothy Jenney

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 07:05 PM

My rabbinic Hebrew prof told me I'd better learn Hebrew well if I wanted to go to heaven. Apparently, it is the only language spoken in Paradise! :-)


Blessings,
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#32 Michael J. Bolesta

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 07:21 PM

My rabbinic Hebrew prof told me I'd better learn Hebrew well if I wanted to go to heaven. Apparently, it is the only language spoken in Paradise! :-)

Which dialect?  :wacko:


Michael


#33 Robert Holmstedt

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 08:22 PM

Which dialect? The southern dialect spoken in the Jerusalem Temple liturgy, of course! 

  :D


Edited by Robert Holmstedt, 11 April 2013 - 08:22 PM.

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Associate Professor, Ancient Hebrew and Northwest Semitic Languages
Dept. of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
The University of Toronto
blog: ancienthebrewgrammar.wordpress.com

#34 James Tucker

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 07:09 AM

For your enjoyment:
 






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