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#1 Jordan S

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 11:33 PM

Simple question. HALOT or NIDNTT/NIDOTTE? I've got some gift cards and only can afford one. Which should l purchase first? I already have BDAG, if it matters.
Thanks for any input.
-Jordan

#2 arcanemuse

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 11:52 PM

They are both on sale. I would say get both but if you can only get one... Since you have BDAG, HALOT would be the logical choice I suppose. If there is anyway you can beg or borrow the rest... go without food, clean clothes.. or something and get them both, then do that. Those are great sale prices... over half off on both. 130 dollars is a lot if you don't have it but it isn't a huge sum to borrow. Got a rich uncle? :-)
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#3 Helen Brown

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 06:13 AM

We also have a payment plan so you can spread out the charge up to 12 months, with a monthly fee of just $4.
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#4 Ken Simpson

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 09:06 AM

I have to admit that in part I disagree with Rick (arcanemuse). I think that since you have BDB, HALOT would be a useful addition, but it is the same type of tool.
NIDNTT/NIDOTTE however are not just lexica (if I can be that rude to BDB/HALOT). They are both theological dictionaries that explore the theologies of the words more than simply the range of meanings. I do agree it is worth getting both, but if I had to choose, and I already had BDB, I would probably choose the dicitionaries since they offer a different type of resource, and they are both fine publications.

Edited by Helen Brown, 24 December 2012 - 09:25 AM.

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#5 jfidel

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 09:45 AM

As a lay person (not a scholar, pastor or seminary student) I find the NIDNTT/NIDOTTE very useful. The NIDOTTE has some excellent articles as well. I do not own the HALOT and know that it is the standard for Hebrew lexicons, however, for my use the Zondervan theological dictionaries are much more approachable and therefore helpful to me.

#6 JonathanHuber

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 10:08 AM

Since you're undecided, I'd guess that you don't absolutely NEED the HALOT, in which case I'll agree with the NIDNTT/NIDOTTE recommendations. These are great resources.

#7 Michael J. Bolesta

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 01:01 PM

It depends on what you wish to do. As has been pointed out, there is a difference between a lexicon and a theological dictionaries. If you are in scholarly (seminary, graduate school, etc) then HALOT a modern, updated "must" (in the same vein, also consider the recently released DCH; NB: nothing wrong with the complete BDB, but BDB does not include new data since c 1906).

On the other hand, if you wish to pursue theological nuances of select words (e.g., not every word found in the Hebrew canon is found in NIDOTTE), the theological dictionaries may be more useful.

In one sense you cannot go wrong with any of the tools, but your personal needs may inform your immediate decision.

Merry Christmas!
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#8 Abram K-J

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 01:27 PM

I do wonder whether the new DCH that Michael mentions will eventually replace HALOT as the scholarly standard? Time will tell, I suppose--I haven't seen any reviews of (or closely examined for myself) DCH. I understand, though, that it covers a wider corpus.

Jordan, the deal Accordance is offering right now on NIDNTT/NIDOTTE seems pretty hard to beat, as far as bang for your buck. I don't recall the regular price for it, but I'd be surprised if that went on sale like that in the future...but if you're spending a lot of time in the Hebrew text, HALOT is a good tool to have.

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#9 Jordan S

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 01:51 PM

Thanks for all of the insight. I am in seminary and I am taking my 2nd Hebrew course this spring. I have BDB and I have used NIDNTT before for writing papers. I really liked it. I know I would use both the HALOT and the other combo. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something obvious having never used HALOT. It sounds like I need to beg for more money and get both. Diapers for the kiddos and seminary are taking up a lot of the extra dough.

#10 Michael J. Bolesta

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 02:15 PM

I do wonder whether the new DCH that Michael mentions will eventually replace HALOT as the scholarly standard? Time will tell, I suppose--I haven't seen any reviews of (or closely examined for myself) DCH. I understand, though, that it covers a wider corpus.


You are correct that DCH covers (as does the shorter Concise DCH) words found in Ben Sira, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and inscriptions that are not found in the Hebrew Bible (hence are not in HALOT or BDB). DCH and Concise DCH includes statistical notation listing the number of occurrences in each of the four categories. Both also include scholarly conjectures about "new" words (or meanings) that have yet to gain consensus. Such words also do not appear in HALOT or BDB.
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#11 Abram K-J

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 02:51 PM

Jordan, I know this is not a parenting forum, but we've found that cloth saves money in the long run, though maybe you're already doing that. It adds up either way, though.

HALOT is a good enough resource that I think you could purchase it site unseen and still be pretty happy with it.

Michael, I'm becoming more and more a fan of including word frequency counts in lexicons. One of the great features of the Septuagint LEH, in my opinion.

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