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Relationship of NA and GNT modules and upgrades


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#21 Daniel Semler

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 01:27 PM

Hi JT,

 

  I was just looking over this and in fact Parker (An Introduction to the NEw Testament Manuscripts and Their Texts, for reference) and he mentions Collate. Collate is now in a second incarnation it seems but it was used on the NA28 apparently. It can handle a bunch of variant texts. There appear to be others like Quasillum's Perl script or Juxta Software's product. Accordance has something to compare texts which while not a collation is in principle not that far.

 

  I hadn't actually been thinking of auto diff tools for this but was more wondering about data entry tools for manually constructed collations. That of course would be possible even using something as simple as a word processor macro.

 

  Not being adequately familiar with the processes of text crit. I expect that there are many more specialized operations where more custom software is helpful., such as your own.

 

Thx

D


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#22 Matthew Burgess

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 02:16 PM

At a foundational level, all eclectic texts and apparatuses are based on collations, which record the ways in which the various manuscripts of a work differ from one another.  I suspect that collation software such as Collate and Juxta (which was developed here at UVA) hasn't been widely accessible because it's usually used by the editors who prepare editions of texts, rather than the readers of those texts.  However, as public interest in textual criticism has deepened, so has the availability and use of these tools (Juxta is freely available online).  Simular results may be achieved using Accordance; when you "compare texts," you're essentially asking Accordance to collate the selected witnesses against one another.  The results aren't perfect, but it's much simpler than manually tagging and processing witnesses!

 

Parker's introduction is very good, but it's a bit idiosyncratic at times, and can also be a bit advanced (depending on one's previous knowledge of textual criticism).  When I'm working with undergrads, I use portions of it as a supplement alongside Robert Hull's The Story of the New Testament Text.   



#23 James Tucker

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 07:29 PM

Daniel, 

 

For entry, I use XML. It gives the necessary complexity needed, while a script can easily return back the data of my queries. As of now, I return back my data in report file. I don't necessarily need a GUI to see the results of my data. Collation is only one step and one aspect of the data, and as Textual Critical research (of the Hebrew Bible and LXX) moves into addressing issues of literary criticism and editions, collation isn't sufficient as variants exist in language, a language which is contingent upon the competence of Scribe or Tradent.


Edited by J. T., 26 May 2013 - 07:30 PM.


#24 Jonathan C. Borland

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 09:13 PM

Jonathan - Where did you hear/read that?  It would be welcome!  I did a web search and couldn't find anything.

 

Hi Julie,

 

Check this post on the Evangelical Textual Criticism blog. Also, a publication of L. M. McDonald (Formation of the BibleThe Story of the Church's Canon) also indicated 2013 as the expected publication date of UBS5. So, who knows? We know it is in the works at least!



#25 Julie Falling

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 09:57 PM

Thanks, Jonathan.  Looks like it may be out this year.


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#26 Daniel Semler

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 10:20 PM

Matthew : Curiously Hull is on my Amazon wish list - so at some point it made the short list. Perhaps I'll get a copy once I'm done with Parker. Downloaded Juxta - interesting. It doesn't contain and probably won't contain all the features of the online web service as that's where the development focus is according to the website, but its more than I need certainly.

 

JT : I assume you are using XML as the format for your own data and annotations. It could and sometimes is the form of the etext also. I wonder about all these formats that we use and all the annotations that we make to them on our way to producing another text of one kind or another. A kind of pluggable format seems appealing. One etext is some adequately capable format (perhaps TEI - yet to look into it enough, EPUB ? not sure yet - we lose in translation here too alas) with hooks that would allow customisation of plugged in/attached data. One could for example imagine a publisher providing an etext that would be the same in Accordance and in Logos and what have you, but to which would be added proprietary tagging elements if required to support specific applications. I could see such a thing for this purpose to. But without understanding Text. Crit. properly I'm not getting much beyond that yet. Anyhow fun to think about.

 

Thx

D


Accordance Configurations :
 
Mac : 2009 27" iMac                 Windows : HP 4540s laptop
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#27 Matthew Burgess

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 10:51 PM

 
Check this post on the Evangelical Textual Criticism blog. Also, a publication of L. M. McDonald (Formation of the BibleThe Story of the Church's Canon) also indicated 2013 as the expected publication date of UBS5. So, who knows? We know it is in the works at least!


At a conference last fall, I heard several scholars and publishers state that UBS-5 was coming out this year. However, for the original purposes of this thread (a base text for the GNT Syntax module), I expect that the text of UBS-5 will be identical to that of NA-28, just as UBS-4 and NA-27 were essentially identical.

#28 Jonathan C. Borland

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 05:28 AM

Hi Matthew,

True, but then the text of NA28 is not much different than that of NA27/UBS4. It's the updated apparatus of both NA28/UBS5 that is different and the big draw for purchasing, and that of UBS5 being far more comprehensive for the 1000 or so variants it covers vs. the 10,000 or so variants included in the Nestle editions.




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