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Anybody Using Mind Mapping (with Accordance) for Preaching?


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#21 Abram K-J

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Posted 23 July 2015 - 10:13 PM

Tree is fairly cheap, and a demo version is available. You may not need all the bells and whistles of OmniOutliner. I like the horizontal structure in Tree.

 

Just tried it out today... I like it, too! At first I thought it just looked like a more inexpensive version of OO (not totally untrue), but the horizontal structure is really cool.


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#22 Abram K-J

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Posted 23 July 2015 - 10:17 PM

Although I like the idea of Markdown for writing—the universality of plain text, separating content from formatting—I haven't been convinced to jump ... yet.

 

Daniel: I hear you, and I think Clint is right. It wouldn't take you that long to figure out how many words your sermons are.

 

However, if you rely so much on formatting (i.e., clause/sentence per line), Markdown might just introduce extra steps for you. I appreciate that one of Markdown's selling points is to not have to fuss with formatting as you're writing, but sometimes it's actually quicker to write formatted text than to work with exporting, previewing in Marked 2, etc.

 

Personally, I think Markdown is a really cool idea in theory, but in practice perhaps not an improvement (in terms of efficiency) over something like MS Word.

 

(Though many will disagree!)

 

That said, Ulysses is a joy to write in.


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#23 Alistair

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 02:27 AM

I write a lot of stuff in Scrivener initially, for its nonlinearity, but it has poor formatting.

I find that I quickly switch to a word processor (Pages) with college essays or sermons.

Does Ulysses have a lot of options regarding layout, styling, etc?



#24 Abram K-J

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 07:52 AM

Alistair: Ulysses has some built-in styling options, and then there is their extensive style exchange.


Abram K-J
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#25 Clint Cozier

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 08:04 AM

Alistair,

 

As Abram suggests, please do take a look at the style exchange and see if there is anything close to the output you want. I've had no problems taking a style and hacking on it a bit to get what I need. The developers of Ulysses have told me that a visual style sheet editor is on their radar screen, but we're not there quite yet. Most of the time, I love keeping content and formatting as separate considerations (the big mantra of the Markdown folks), but every now and then the theory doesn't work out so well in practice. It will depend on your particular needs.


Edited by Clint Cozier, 24 July 2015 - 08:04 AM.


#26 Alistair

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 08:32 AM

What Scrivener does is use spaces instead of tabs in bullet points, numbered paragraphs and indents, so when I bring my work in to Pages or Quark or whatever I have to tidy that up manually.

 

I use Scrivener because I write non-linearly, usually several projects concurrently.


Edited by Alistair, 24 July 2015 - 08:34 AM.


#27 Clint Cozier

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 10:43 AM

This is really off topic but......as long as we're running through the apps people use to shape sermons and hold information, is anyone using Nota Bene? It has most of the tools we've discussed in this thread (database (bucket app), bibliographic management, outliner, word processor) in one (tight?) bundle of related applications with the word processor at the center of it all. I've played with it for years, but just can't quite fall in love with it for content creation. That, and the lack of iOS tools. I still love curling up in a coffee shop to write a sermon, and my iPad is the best tool for that. Still, it seems to me all the parts are there and I've spent a lot of time recreating Nota Bene's functionality in OSX. 

 

Any users out there?



#28 Michel Gilbert

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 01:32 PM

Hi Clint,

 

Not sure if this will help, but I tried NB recently and decided to not go with it.

 

I didn't find its word processor to be any better than Word. It isn't Unicode compliant; I couldn't even paste some Unicode fonts into it. To be fair, they say they are working on it. Also, my Windows (and I presume OSX) system keyboards didn't/(wouldn't) work in NB. To be fair, it looked like I could make custom keyboards in NB, but these first two problems were deal breakers already. Finally, I didn't find any reason to switch to NB's outliner.

 

Instead, I found substitutes for all of NB's features. First, like Alistair, I "write (also think) non-linearly, usually several projects concurrently," so Scrivener worked better for me than NB. Scrivener also allows you to outline whole folders and files, not just the headings in a single file. Second, I substituted DocFetcher at http://docfetcher.so...t/en/index.html for NB's search engine, which searches many more file types than Orbis. Third, I substituted Zotero for Ibidem. I'd probably use Sente 6 on a Mac at http://www.thirdstre...site/Sente.html .

 

I also use these substitutes along with BibleWorks 10. Its word processor is excellent (head and shoulders above the rest), and is Unicode compliant. It takes one click to switch from Greek to Hebrew to English, which changes the font and system keyboard automatically (to what you set it). Also, you can search in one file or all BW files within the program, much like in NB. BW10 is cheaper than NB with the Greek and Hebrew module.

 

Some might wonder why I already recommended NB to those starting out. All of its features are designed to build momentum from the moment you begin using it, i.e., writing everything in it, and building your bibliographies. I also thought that those working with ancient texts would appreciates its three levels of footnotes/endnotes.  

 

Clint, you love your iPad, and I love mine. I just posted that Word now supports Hebrew on the iPad. Also, Scrivener is coming to the iPad (in beta release now). So I'll continue to read and make notes in BW, including compiling my own user lexicons, use Accordance mostly for syntax searches (head and shoulders above the rest), copy to Scrivener, compile to Word, and be able to do these on the iPad soon, only needing iTeleport for BW on the iPad.

 

Regards,

 

Michel


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