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Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament (BDAG)

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Category: Greek Lexicons

$164.00    Our Price: $159.00 (Save $5.00 or 3.05%)
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The long-awaited third edition of the Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament edited by Fredrick William Danker, needs no introduction as it is the standard lexicon for Greek New Testament studies.

Described as an “invaluable reference work” (Classical Philology) and “a tool indispensable for the study of early Christian literature” (Religious Studies Review) in its previous edition, this new updated American edition of Walter Bauer's Wörterbuch zu den Schriften des Neuen Testaments builds on its predecessor’s staggering deposit of extraordinary erudition relating to Greek literature from all periods. Including entries for many more words, the new edition also lists more than 25,000 additional references to classical, intertestamental, Early Christian, and modern literature.

In this edition, Frederick W. Danker's broad knowledge of Greco-Roman literature, as well as papyri and epigraphs, provides a more panoramic view of the world of Jesus and the New Testament. Danker has also introduced a more consistent mode of reference citation, and has provided a composite list of abbreviations to facilitate easy access to this wealth of information.

Perhaps the single most important lexical innovation of Danker's edition is its inclusion of extended definitions for Greek terms. For instance, a key meaning of “episkopos” was defined in the second American edition as overseer; Danker defines it as “one who has the responsibility of safeguarding or seeing to it that something is done in the correct way, guardian.” Such extended definitions give a fuller sense of the word in question, which will help avoid both anachronisms and confusion among users of the lexicon who may not be native speakers of English.

Danker's edition of Bauer's Wörterbuch will be an indispensable guide for Biblical and classical scholars, ministers, seminarians, and translators.

Save with the BDAG/HALOT Bundle.

A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and other Early Christian Literature
Third Edition (2000)
• Editor: Fredrick William Danker
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (2000)

Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament (BDAG) is included with the following packages:

category
code
title
price
AB-Blue2
$850.00
AB-Blue3
$1,000.00
BDAG/HALOT bundle
$299.00
Greek Master 11.14
$2,999.00
Collection11-Ultimate
$1,999.00

Reviews

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November 15, 2011  |  1:08 PM  |  Fantastic (5)
The third edition of this standard Greek-English Lexicon does not disappoint. It is a significant improvement from its predecessor in at least two respects. First, specific Greek words have been given general definitions even where the word covers a wide semantic domain. This was not the case in previous editions where the reader was left with the meaning of a word only in its particular occurrence. Now readers can draw conclusion about the basic meaning of any given Greek word. The approach suggests a regression in the approach to biblical words spearheaded by James Barr in his "Semantics of Biblical Language" and a return to the approach of older lexicographers to the effect that words have meanings. Second, the range of Greek authors has been expanded and now includes noncanonical (especially apocryphal) Greek writings of special interest for the study of early Christian origins. The type set and publication of this electronic edition is outstanding, making it a pleasure to read.
The third edition of this standard Greek-English Lexicon does not disappoint. It is a significant improvement from its predecessor in at least two respects. First, specific Greek words have been given general definitions even where the word covers a wide semantic domain. This was not the case in previous editions where the reader was left with the meaning of a word only in its particular occurrence. Now readers can draw conclusion about the basic meaning of any given Greek word. The approach suggests a regression in the approach to biblical words spearheaded by James Barr in his "Semantics of Biblical Language" and a return to the approach of older lexicographers to the effect that words have meanings. Second, the range of Greek authors has been expanded and now includes noncanonical (especially apocryphal) Greek writings of special interest for the study of early Christian origins. The type set and publication of this electronic edition is outstanding, making it a pleasure to read.
November 8, 2011  |  9:30 AM  |  Okay (3)
This is of course the best Koine Greek lexicon available, and it's great to have access to it electronically. Having it on Accordance saves lots of time over flipping through the hardback version.

However, the format of the text leaves something to be desired. The Scripture references are highlighted, which is nice for quick reference and scanning the entry, but I often have to look very carefully to find the beginning of new sections within an entry (1, 2, a, b, etc.). Some color-coding or significant bolding would be much welcome.

Overall, this is an excellent resource for Greek study, and the drawbacks are overshadowed by the convenience of having an indexed, digital copy of this amazing lexicon.
November 8, 2011  |  2:03 AM  |  Good (4)
Thought long and hard about whether to buy this electronically or hardback, and glad I chose the former (although I know some can stretch to both!) It just means that I can quickly and easily refer to words and get my head round them when preparing talks. All the info is there at the hover of the mouse, and offers so much comprehensive analysis.

Better iOS integration would be helpful. It works, but needs a little tweaking to be useful when out and about for quick references. I can't see how to make it the main lexicon on the device, which would be great!
November 4, 2011  | 12:39 PM  |  Good (4)
Very helpful for understanding definitions and the semantic range of a word. Would be helpful if when searching a word from James 4:1, lets say, instead of opening the main section of the given word, that instead it opened it under how it is used in that context.