Product Details

Contemporary English Version

See packages below which include this module.

Category: English Bibles

$29.90    Our Price: $19.90 (Save $10.00 or 33.44%)
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Uncompromising simplicity marked the American Bible Society’s translation of the Contemporary English Version Bible that was first published in 1995. The text is easily read by grade schoolers, second language readers, and those who prefer the more contemporized form. The CEV is not a paraphrase. It is an accurate and faithful translation of the original manuscripts.

Along with the CEV Bible, purchase of this module includes the Translators’ Notes (CEV Notes) in a separate module.

Contemporary English Version Bible
• Publisher: American Bible Society (1995)

Contemporary English Version is included with the following packages:

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English Bible add-on
$329.99

Reviews

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November 15, 2011  |  1:33 PM  |  Good (4)
The CEV falls into the "meaning for meaning" category of translations. On the whole it succeeds as it avoids the tendency among similar translations to elaborate where there is no real need to do so. The economic use of the English language is a triumph. I also appreciate the way in which the text has been set out, particularly, in poetry passages.

My objections to the translation have more to do with my general reservation about the type of translation than with the CEV in particular. The desire to render the Bible in modern English can result is a great deal of de-theologizing. Key theological terms like "redemption" and "justification" are rendered by such English phrases as "set free" and "put right". This type of translation has its benefits but often the result is oversimpification. At times the translation fails, such as in John 3:5 CEV "You must be born not only by water but by the spirit". Here the CEV sets birth by water against birth by the spirit and yet in Greek ...
The CEV falls into the "meaning for meaning" category of translations. On the whole it succeeds as it avoids the tendency among similar translations to elaborate where there is no real need to do so. The economic use of the English language is a triumph. I also appreciate the way in which the text has been set out, particularly, in poetry passages.

My objections to the translation have more to do with my general reservation about the type of translation than with the CEV in particular. The desire to render the Bible in modern English can result is a great deal of de-theologizing. Key theological terms like "redemption" and "justification" are rendered by such English phrases as "set free" and "put right". This type of translation has its benefits but often the result is oversimpification. At times the translation fails, such as in John 3:5 CEV "You must be born not only by water but by the spirit". Here the CEV sets birth by water against birth by the spirit and yet in Greek they can only be taken together since a single preposition governs the phrase.

Despite these misgivings, I am pleased to have been introduced to the CEV. I have tried it out and it sounds good when read aloud. Take note of the translation of Deut 6.20 where the parent's language to his child is rendered in a childlike manner. Also Luke 8 where Legion is translated as "Lot" because there are "Lots" of us.
November 8, 2011  |  1:58 AM  |  Fantastic (5)
Bought as an additional reference to see how translator's have handled the knottier passages in a 'Contemporary' way! Found it helpful to try and put things in the vernacular whilst preaching, combined with a more technical translation too.