Product Details

GNT Papyri

See packages below which include this module.

Category: Greek Bibles

$69.99

Details


The GNT papyri presented for Accordance are based on the 2nd edition of Comfort and Barrett's The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts. In addition to containing introductions and transcriptions of each of the sixty-nine earliest Greek NT manuscripts, the Accordance edition presents them as morphologically tagged, and in an uncial font which more closely represents the typestyle of these papyri.  The Accordance edition of GNT papyri may also be grammatically and/or lexically searched or browsed either in MS order, or in canonical order.  They may also be compared to other morphologically tagged MSS available for Accordance, such as Bezae, Vaticanus, Sinaiticus, or Washingtonensis.  Due to licensing restrictions, it should be noted that actual images of the MSS found in the print edition are not included. Samples can be found, however, by searching for them on the web. Morphological tagging by Rex A. Koivisto of Multnomah University, Portland, Oregon.

Version 2.0 includes transcriptions of five new papyri not included in the print.

GNT Papyri is included with the following packages:

category
code
title
price
Codex add-on
$199.99
Greek Master 11.13 add-on
$2,499.99
Greek NT MSS add-on
$349.99
Collection10-Ultimate_14
$1,999.99

Reviews

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January 11, 2012  | 12:38 PM  |  Good (4)
This module is worthy of adding to your collections for two reasons:

1) It gives you the uncial text of the earliest papyri of the NT. So, while the NA apparatus and the CNTTS database give you the variants, if you want to look a little more in depth, you can do so with this module. Sometimes there aren’t any papyri which contain the verses you might be working with in the NT. What is nice about this module is that when there are several papyri which contain the verse, it lists all of them. Take Jude 5 as an example:

(P72) ⲩⲡⲟⲙⲛⲏⲥⲉ ⲇⲉ ⲩⲙⲁⲥ ⲃⲟⲩ
ⲗⲟⲙⲁⲓ ⲉⲓⲇⲟⲧⲁⲥ ⲁⲡⲁⲝ ⲡⲁⲛⲧⲁⲥ
ⲟⲧⲓ ⲑ̅ⲥ̅ ⲭ̅ⲣ̅ⲥ̅ ⲗⲁⲟⲛ ⲉⲅ * [1370] ⲅⲏⲥ ⲉⲅⲩⲡⲧⲟⲩ
ⲥⲱⲥⲁⲥ ⲧⲟ ⲇⲉⲩⲧⲉⲣⲟⲛ ⲧⲟⲩⲥ ⲙⲏ
ⲡⲉⲓⲥⲧⲉⲩⲥⲁⲛⲧⲁⲥ ⲁⲡⲱⲗⲉⲥⲉⲛ
...
This module is worthy of adding to your collections for two reasons:

1) It gives you the uncial text of the earliest papyri of the NT. So, while the NA apparatus and the CNTTS database give you the variants, if you want to look a little more in depth, you can do so with this module. Sometimes there aren’t any papyri which contain the verses you might be working with in the NT. What is nice about this module is that when there are several papyri which contain the verse, it lists all of them. Take Jude 5 as an example:

(P72) ⲩⲡⲟⲙⲛⲏⲥⲉ ⲇⲉ ⲩⲙⲁⲥ ⲃⲟⲩ
ⲗⲟⲙⲁⲓ ⲉⲓⲇⲟⲧⲁⲥ ⲁⲡⲁⲝ ⲡⲁⲛⲧⲁⲥ
ⲟⲧⲓ ⲑ̅ⲥ̅ ⲭ̅ⲣ̅ⲥ̅ ⲗⲁⲟⲛ ⲉⲅ * [1370] ⲅⲏⲥ ⲉⲅⲩⲡⲧⲟⲩ
ⲥⲱⲥⲁⲥ ⲧⲟ ⲇⲉⲩⲧⲉⲣⲟⲛ ⲧⲟⲩⲥ ⲙⲏ
ⲡⲉⲓⲥⲧⲉⲩⲥⲁⲛⲧⲁⲥ ⲁⲡⲱⲗⲉⲥⲉⲛ
 
(P78) ⲩ̈ⲡⲟ
ⲙⲛⲏⲥⲁⲓ ⲇⲉ ⲩ̈ⲙⲁⲥ
ⲃⲟⲩⲗⲟⲙⲉ ⲁⲇⲉⲗⲫⲟ̣ⲓ̣

2) The Notes module is wonderful. It gives the history, provenance and signifigance of each papyrus. Through my years at our seminary I had heard words like “Chester-Beatty Papyrus” and “Bodmer” papyrus. The notes clearly explain why they are important in a clear, straightforward way. Take for example the commentary on the Bodmer papyrus:

“Kurt Aland’s thinking was also changed by P75. He used to speak of the second and third century manuscripts as exhibiting a text in flux or even a “mixed” text, but not after the discovery of P75. He wrote, “P75 shows such a close affinity with the Codex Vaticanus that the supposition of a recension of the text at Alexandria, in the fourth century, can no longer be held.”9 Even more so, Gordon Fee argued there was no Alexandrian recension before the time of P75 (late second century) and Codex Vaticanus (early fourth) and that both these manuscripts “seem to represent a ‘relatively pure’ form of preservation of a ‘relatively pure’ line of descent from the original text.”10

In the final analysis, it must be declared that P75 is an extremely accurate copy. Concerning the scribe who made P75, Colwell said, “his impulse to improve style is for the most part defeated by the obligation to make an exact copy.””

N.B. The text is tagged. So, if you aren't used to the uncial font you can still figure out what it is by looking at the instant details box. And after a reading the uncial font for a little while you can get used to the texts from the GNT-image collections.

The only drawback is that the images are not included. But, I suppose, if they were, it would cost much more than $70.