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An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon (Liddell and Scott)

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Category: Greek Lexicons

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This module is an intermediate abridgement of the Liddell & Scott’s Complete Greek Lexicon (LSJ) and covers Classical and Patristic Greek as well as Biblical Greek.

There are two condensed editions of the Complete LSJ: A Lexicon: Abridged from Liddell and Scott’s Greek-English Lexicon (an 1843 version sometimes called “the Little Liddell”) and this work, An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon (an 1889 version referred to as “the Middle Liddle”).

In comparison to the smaller abridgment, this "Middle Liddell" contains more entries covering the essential vocabulary of most commonly read Ancient Greek literature, adds citations of the authors to illustrate the history of Greek usage (without identifying the passages), and provides more help with irregular forms.

An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon
• Founded upon The Seventh Edition of Liddell and Scott’s Greek-English Lexicon
• Editors: Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, Henry Stuart Jones, Roderick McKenzie
• Text of the 1889 (7th Edition) published by Oxford Press

An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon (Liddell and Scott) is included with the following packages:

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Greek Master 11.13 add-on
$2,499.99

Reviews

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February 27, 2013  |  8:00 AM  |  Good (4)
Good dictionary with a broad vocabulary. Used together with the [link] funktion in BDAG, it works really well.

Be aware, that Accordance also offers the full edition of the 9th edition of Liddell and Scott. It's double the price, but in the long run it's worth it.
August 31, 2012  |  5:32 AM  |  Good (4)
Certainly the best lexicon for classical Greek studies. I use this lexicon often for diachronic word studies because it has a simplified format compared to the unabridged hard copy (although it would be nice to have the unabridged version complete with instant details tied to dates and names).
November 15, 2011  |  7:43 AM  |  Fantastic (5)
I began using this intermediate Greek Lexicon in my first year of Greek. Twenty five years later, it remains one of the most important resources I own. No student of Classical Greek or indeed of New Testament Greek can afford to be without it. Although it is an abridgment of a larger work, it is by no means incomplete in its intermediate form, and in some respects is a better option than the larger edition, which is full of long citations from classical authors.

As far as using this lexicon for the study of the New Testament, it remains an excellent lexicon even for New Testament studies. My reasons are as follows:

First, the glosses offered in Liddell/Scott are extremely accurate. I have never found them to be wrong and seldom found them inadequate. The men who put this work together had a masterful knowledge of Greek.

Second, Liddell/Scott provides concrete definitions that the student can memorize, unlike Bauer/Danker, which sometimes provides too wide a range of ...
I began using this intermediate Greek Lexicon in my first year of Greek. Twenty five years later, it remains one of the most important resources I own. No student of Classical Greek or indeed of New Testament Greek can afford to be without it. Although it is an abridgment of a larger work, it is by no means incomplete in its intermediate form, and in some respects is a better option than the larger edition, which is full of long citations from classical authors.

As far as using this lexicon for the study of the New Testament, it remains an excellent lexicon even for New Testament studies. My reasons are as follows:

First, the glosses offered in Liddell/Scott are extremely accurate. I have never found them to be wrong and seldom found them inadequate. The men who put this work together had a masterful knowledge of Greek.

Second, Liddell/Scott provides concrete definitions that the student can memorize, unlike Bauer/Danker, which sometimes provides too wide a range of semantic possibilities (often entrees are clouded with dozens of possible meanings, none of which are necessary if a student has basic definitions with which to work).

Third, with Liddell/Scott, one can see what the word meant in classical writers and can see how it developed in Hellenistic Greek. Classical usage remains common even in the New Testament.

Fourth, this is not a bulky work.

Finally, the electronic edition is of a very high standard.

Although the student of New Testament would naturally incline to Danker’s Greek-English Lexicon, a student ignores this masterful work to their own loss.