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Spicq Theological Lexicon of the NT

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Category: Greek Lexicons

$149.00    Our Price: $59.90 (Save $89.10 or 59.8%)

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A translation of the 3-volume work, Notes de lexicographie néo-testamentaire, by the premier biblical exegete Ceslas Spicq, the Theological Lexicon of the New Testament (TLNT) will surely take its place alongside other standard language tools. One plus to this work is that it is self-consciously theological. Spicq’s quest is not for morphology, orthography, or even grammar or syntax; rather, he wants to uncover the religious meaning of the language used in the New Testament. To accomplish his task, Spicq mines the vast resources of epigraphical texts, papyri, classical writings, the Greek Old Testament, Hellenistic authors, and innumerable sources to inform his study of New Testament Koine. Not merely following in the footsteps of other such works, more than half of the words in TLNT do not receive significant treatment in the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, and his impressive familiarity with a variety of resources—from funerary inscriptions to papyri fragments—deems his work extraordinary.

In the upper portion of each article entry the Greek lexical form of the word or word group appears, and the lower portion contains:

  • Fully transliterated English form
  • Brief definition
  • Terms in the text itself are transliterated for the nonspecialist, while scholars can quickly reference the original language in the article entry.
  • Scholars especially will appreciate the extensive footnotes, which review a term’s use in the papyri, in the Septuagint, and in classical and Hellenistic writings and then assess the value of this material for understanding the NT. Parallels in Jewish writings, including the Pseudepigrapha, Apocrypha, and Qumran, are also included.
  • Spicq supplies vital bibliography from a wide range of resources. And in this edition, any references to French, German, or other foreign language works that have been translated into English are given in their English form.
  • In the resource notes, each term is conveniently keyed to Strong’s Concordance numbering and cross-referenced to major lexical resources, such as Louw and Nida’s Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament Based on Semantic Domains or the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament.

Theological Lexicon of the New Testament
• Author: Ceslas Spicq

• Translator/Editor: James D. Ernest

• Publisher: Hendrickson Publishers (1994)

Spicq Theological Lexicon of the NT is included with the following packages:

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Coll10-Essential Upg_14
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Collection10-Advanced_14
$749.00
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$399.00
Collection10-OrigLang_14
$239.00
Collection10-Ultimate_14
$1,499.00

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November 20, 2011  |  8:43 AM  |  Good (4)
I have been a Accordance user since 2008. By far the Accordance program has been the best software I have used in regards to word studies. Spicq Lexicon on New Testament words gives you details of HOW words derived its meaning in the New Testatment. Spicq does not offer a wide range of words compared to other Greek Lexicons but when you get the meaning from Spicq it covers a broader range of understanding. For example Look at faith in Hebrew 11:1 given by Spicq..........The usage of pistis in the papyri is usually legal, and its predominant meaning is “guarantee, security.” Pursuant to a loan granted him by Zeno, Philo reckons that his creditor is claiming more than his due. The judges ask for a statement of credits and debts that both parties agree is correct, and they decide—with respect to the contested sums—that the adversaries must exchange guarantees (pisteis ) in the Serapeum of Parmeniscos.4 In 108 BC, 150 artabai of borrowed grain are guaranteed by a mortgage on the ...
I have been a Accordance user since 2008. By far the Accordance program has been the best software I have used in regards to word studies. Spicq Lexicon on New Testament words gives you details of HOW words derived its meaning in the New Testatment. Spicq does not offer a wide range of words compared to other Greek Lexicons but when you get the meaning from Spicq it covers a broader range of understanding. For example Look at faith in Hebrew 11:1 given by Spicq..........The usage of pistis in the papyri is usually legal, and its predominant meaning is “guarantee, security.” Pursuant to a loan granted him by Zeno, Philo reckons that his creditor is claiming more than his due. The judges ask for a statement of credits and debts that both parties agree is correct, and they decide—with respect to the contested sums—that the adversaries must exchange guarantees (pisteis ) in the Serapeum of Parmeniscos.4 In 108 BC, 150 artabai of borrowed grain are guaranteed by a mortgage on the cultivated lands owned by the borrowers; these ask the epistates of Akoris to require written guarantees from their lender.5 Pisti Didymou means “with Didymos’s guarantee” (P.Warr. 5, 15) or “Didymos stood surety” (P.Princ. 26, 5). Pistis must be given this meaning of “guarantee” in Acts 17:31—God has given a “guarantee” through a man that he will resurrect the dead; and that is the meaning of hypostasis in Heb 11:1—“Faith is the guarantee of things hoped for,”6 well translated in the Peshitta by pyso. The substantive hypostasis, literally “that which is placed beneath,” hence “support, base, foundation,” has already been used (Heb 1:3) in its philosophical meaning, “substance” as opposed to accidents, “reality” as opposed to appearances. Hence its psychological and moral meaning: “that which is at the bottom of one’s soul, firmness, confidence, courage”; but in the papyri, it also refers to a right of possession, the entirety of an inheritance (P.Oxy. 138, 26; 488, 17; 1274, 15; P.Harr. 90, 2), its guarantee (P.Eleph. 15, 3), or better, the collection of documents stored in the archives as surety and constituting the evidence for a property right (P.Oxy. 237, col. IV, 39; VIII, 26, 34, 42; UPZ 222). Thus faith is the true title attesting to one’s ownership of the heavenly property that one hopes for, and thus the guarantee that one will obtain them in the future.