Reviews by Robb Brunansky
December 5, 2011  |  1:58 AM  |  Fantastic (5)
Before diving into this module, make sure you read the handout on the syntax modules. For many students, the terminology and diagram style will be unfamiliar at first, but after a little bit of effort, it becomes obvious why Accordance chose to use this syntactical method. It is the least subjective method of syntax tagging available. One of the greatest problems with syntax tagging in certain schemes is that the person who creates the tags does too much subjective work, often making e ...
Before diving into this module, make sure you read the handout on the syntax modules. For many students, the terminology and diagram style will be unfamiliar at first, but after a little bit of effort, it becomes obvious why Accordance chose to use this syntactical method. It is the least subjective method of syntax tagging available. One of the greatest problems with syntax tagging in certain schemes is that the person who creates the tags does too much subjective work, often making exegetical decisions. That problem is minimized with the Accordance Greek (and Hebrew) syntax modules.

This is an invaluable resource that will take your search capabilities in Accordance to a new level. This power, though, does require learning the tagging scheme, especially if you want to do embedded syntax construct searches. Any student of the NT who takes the time to learn how to use this module will find his effort repaid many times over.
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December 5, 2011  |  1:44 AM  |  Fantastic (5)
The PNTC series has long been one of my favorites, containing excellent volumes on John, Ephesians, Thessalonians, 2 Peter and Jude, and the Johannine Epistles. The other volumes are all worthy of space on any pastor's digital bookshelf as well. PNTC is primarily concerned with exegesis of the text and not as much with technical questions such as source theories about the Gospels. It accomplishes this objective admirably. The only criticism I have of this series currently is the number of ...
The PNTC series has long been one of my favorites, containing excellent volumes on John, Ephesians, Thessalonians, 2 Peter and Jude, and the Johannine Epistles. The other volumes are all worthy of space on any pastor's digital bookshelf as well. PNTC is primarily concerned with exegesis of the text and not as much with technical questions such as source theories about the Gospels. It accomplishes this objective admirably. The only criticism I have of this series currently is the number of volumes not yet released. Currently the PNTC series only contains 9 volumes covering twelve NT writings, less than half of the NT. Nevertheless, what is available is worth the price, and updates to the series, both in Accordance and in print, are forthcoming.
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December 5, 2011  |  1:37 AM  |  Good (4)
This commentary series from Broadman & Holman represents a conservative, evangelical viewpoint on biblical interpretation. The series is nearly complete, lacking volumes only on 1 Corinthians, Ephesians, Hebrews, and Revelation. The NAC attempts to strike a balance between detailed exegesis and contemporary application, and its target audience is especially pastors and Bible teachers. It is based on the New International Version. All technical commentary is placed in the f ...
This commentary series from Broadman & Holman represents a conservative, evangelical viewpoint on biblical interpretation. The series is nearly complete, lacking volumes only on 1 Corinthians, Ephesians, Hebrews, and Revelation. The NAC attempts to strike a balance between detailed exegesis and contemporary application, and its target audience is especially pastors and Bible teachers. It is based on the New International Version. All technical commentary is placed in the footnotes.

The volumes in this series are generally good, though, like many commentary series, the quality is uneven. The volumes on 2 Corinthians and Philippians/Colossians/Philemon are very good; the volume on 1 & 2 Peter and Jude is outstanding. It is perhaps the best single volume available based on the English text of these general epistles. Polhill's work on Acts is thoroughly studies and thoughtfully presented. Other volumes, such as Borchert's 2-volume work on John's Gospel, are disappointing, and readers would find better work in Pillar NTC and NICNT.

Overall, the NAC is a solid series, and it is especially suited for the busy pastor looking for a few reliable, accurate commentaries. I recommend it with the caution that not all volumes are of equal value, but the outstanding volumes outnumber the disappointing ones.
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November 29, 2011  |  5:30 PM  |  Fantastic (5)
I've owned the print edition of NICOT for years (updating it as new volumes appeared), and I recently sold it and purchased the Accordance edition as soon as it was available. This series covers much of the OT with the exception of Exodus, Judges, 2nd Samuel, Kings and Chronicles, Esther, Psalms, Lamentations, Daniel, Amos, and Zechariah, which have not yet been published. Each volume in this series presents exegesis of the biblical text with a wealth of footnotes directing the reader to other ...
I've owned the print edition of NICOT for years (updating it as new volumes appeared), and I recently sold it and purchased the Accordance edition as soon as it was available. This series covers much of the OT with the exception of Exodus, Judges, 2nd Samuel, Kings and Chronicles, Esther, Psalms, Lamentations, Daniel, Amos, and Zechariah, which have not yet been published. Each volume in this series presents exegesis of the biblical text with a wealth of footnotes directing the reader to other articles and resources for further study. The perspective of the commentary series is largely evangelical. Generally, multi-author commentary series are a bit uneven and the quality varies from volume to volume, sometimes widely, but in the NICOT series, each volume is well-written and of high quality. NICOT isn't cheap, but it is well worth every penny.
  [ FULL REVIEW ]
November 29, 2011  |  5:22 PM  |  Fantastic (5)
The IVP Reference Collection is one of the best values, dollar for dollar, of any collection available in Accordance. Each dictionary offers something helpful and unique, with articles that are generally of enough depth to give the beginner a firm grasp on a subject and the related issues. The Pocket Dictionaries provide a helpful introduction to just about any theological term a student is trying to understand. The background commentaries add color and depth to the reading of the Bible, and ...
The IVP Reference Collection is one of the best values, dollar for dollar, of any collection available in Accordance. Each dictionary offers something helpful and unique, with articles that are generally of enough depth to give the beginner a firm grasp on a subject and the related issues. The Pocket Dictionaries provide a helpful introduction to just about any theological term a student is trying to understand. The background commentaries add color and depth to the reading of the Bible, and this collection includes both the OT and the NT volumes. For anyone looking to enhance their Accordance library with a variety of tools that cover a broad spectrum of topics, the IVP Reference Collection should be at the top of the list.
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November 29, 2011  |  5:16 PM  |  Okay (3)
This dictionary fills a void in standard reference works by providing introductory articles on people, writings, and other relevant data to early Judaism. "Early Judaism" covers roughly from late fourth century BC to late second century AD.

One of the strongest aspects of this dictionary are the thirteen introductory essays before the individual articles begin. These essays cover such topics as the current state of early Judaism scholarship, Diaspora Judaism, early Jewish interpretation o ...
This dictionary fills a void in standard reference works by providing introductory articles on people, writings, and other relevant data to early Judaism. "Early Judaism" covers roughly from late fourth century BC to late second century AD.

One of the strongest aspects of this dictionary are the thirteen introductory essays before the individual articles begin. These essays cover such topics as the current state of early Judaism scholarship, Diaspora Judaism, early Jewish interpretation of the Bible, and more. These essays alone make this an important resource for any student of biblical backgrounds.

The 520 entries are of varying quality and length. The contributors are of varying backgrounds and traditions, making for an interesting mix of viewpoints throughout the dictionary. The images scattered throughout the various entries enhance the articles as well. For many articles, I would have preferred a bit more depth than is provided, but then again, this is a reference work and not meant to be an in-depth study of each aspect of early Judaism.

For those who are interested in this particular subject area, this is a must-have resource. For those looking for a more general Bible dictionary or reference work, look elsewhere. Something like the Zondervan Pictorial Encyclopedia of the Bible or the IVP Reference Collection would be better suited for your needs.
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November 23, 2011  |  5:38 PM  |  Good (4)
The NIGTC is a series primarily directed at those with some basic knowledge of NT Greek. Like most commentary series, some volumes are stronger contributions than others, but all thirteen volumes are useful and contain practical help with exegeting the Greek text. This series in Accordance features all the print volumes available, including the currently out-of-print volume on Colossians by J.D.G. Dunn.

The strongest volumes, in my opinion, are the ones on Revelation by Beale, 1 ...
The NIGTC is a series primarily directed at those with some basic knowledge of NT Greek. Like most commentary series, some volumes are stronger contributions than others, but all thirteen volumes are useful and contain practical help with exegeting the Greek text. This series in Accordance features all the print volumes available, including the currently out-of-print volume on Colossians by J.D.G. Dunn.

The strongest volumes, in my opinion, are the ones on Revelation by Beale, 1 Corinthians by Thistleton, 2 Corinthians by Harris, and the Pastoral Epistles by Knight. I have found that the volumes on Luke and Colossians are not as helpful for exegesis, as they often tend to focus on more specialized areas of study, such as the authorship of Colossians or the relationship of Luke to the other synoptics. While these are interesting questions, they should reside more in the introduction than in the commentary proper, which is, unfortunately, not the case in these two volumes. At times, Dunn's volume reads more like an extended discussion of Pauline authorship, and Marshall's work on Luke seems more like an extended discussion of various types of Gospel criticism.

In general, these commentaries are conservative and, in most respects, evangelical. They provide adequate bibliographies to help the student and scholar alike begin to swim through the ocean of secondary literature, as well as containing helpful footnotes throughout. My biggest criticism of the series is that it is incomplete and missing volumes on significant NT documents like the Gospel of John and the Epistle to the Romans. We can hope that Eerdmans/Paternoster will have forthcoming works complete this otherwise outstanding series.
  [ FULL REVIEW ]

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