Accordance Blog
Mar 20, 2017 Richard Mansfield

NEW! Göttingen LXX: Job

We continue to add titles to our Göttingen Septuagint (LXX) series for the Accordance Bible Software Library, including the Book of Job (lob. Septuaginta: Vetus Testamentum Graecum, 11/4), edited by Joseph Ziegler, which we are making available today.

The Göttingen Septuagint (Vetus Testamentum Graecum: Auctoritate Academiae Scientiarum Gottingensis editum) is a major critical version, comprising multiple volumes published from 1931 to the present and not yet complete.

As with other titles in the Göttingen Septuagint, this edition of Job in the LXX comes in three modules that can be viewed in parallel as seen in the image below (click/tap to enlarge): (1) the main text in Greek, which is fully tagged with morphological information; (2) the main critical apparatus noting differences in various LXX manuscripts, and (3) a second critical apparatus reflecting differences in the texts of Aquila, Symachus, and Theodotion.

Göttingen LXX Job

For users who have the Journal of Biblical Literature in their personal Accordance Libraries, I highly recommend the 1984 review of the Göttingen LXX Job by Albert Pietersma. This review is not only extremely thorough, but also offers an indispensable history of the LXX version of Job for those interested in the subject. Although Pietersma is quite critical of some of Ziegler’s choices, he admits at the beginning of the review that the Göttingen edition of Job “becomes immediately the basis for all future study on the Greek Job.” Although this review was written 33 years ago, this statement is absolutely no less true today.

Most Accordance users who will be interested in the Göttingen LXX Job will probably already have the Rahlfs' edition of the LXX in their personal Accordance Libraries. Due to the vastly greater number of manuscripts that Ziegler had to work with over the handful in Rahlfs' edition, Accordance users will want to put both texts side by side and use Accordance’s Compare Text feature to note the differences between the two editions.

Göttingen LXX Job - compared

Click/tap the image above to see a closer look at Job in the Rahlfs' LXX compared with the Göttingen LXX.

The Göttingen LXX Job may be purchased individually or as part of the larger Göttingen LXX Bundle. Introductory pricing is available for a limited time.

Göttingen LXX Bundle (18 Volumes)
List Price $1059
Regular Price $799
Sale Price $549

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Göttingen LXX Job
Regular Price $79.90
Sale Price $59.90

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Special Introductory Pricing listed above is good through March 27, 2017 (11:59 pm EDT). Cannot be combined with any other discounts.

 

Jan 6, 2017 Richard Mansfield

ICYMI: New Biblical Studies Titles Released This Week!

Earlier this week, we released a number of new titles related to understanding the Bible. These are significant titles you will want to consider adding to your personal Accordance Library—especially while you can still get them at introductory pricing!

Ryken’s Reading the Bible As Literature Series

Ryken-4 Leland Ryken’s name has become synonymous with a modern literary approach to the Bible. A longtime professor of English at Wheaton College, this series combines four of Ryken’s best titles for understanding biblical content:

  • How Bible Stories Work: A Guided Study of Biblical Narrative
  • Sweeter Than Honey, Richer Than Gold: A Guided Study of Biblical Poetry
  • Jesus the Hero: A Guided Literary Study of the Gospels
  • Letters of Grace and Beauty: A Guided Literary Study of New Testament Epistles

These kinds of works are vitally important for proper understanding and interpretation of the Bible as errors often result from misunderstanding the literary genre of biblical writings. And the Bible has multiple genres with different rules for engagement and understanding!

Ryken Reading the Bible screenshot

Click/tap the image above for a larger look at Ryken's Reading the Bible As Literature Series (biblical text not included)

Reading the Bible as Literature (4 Volumes)
Regular Price $39.90
Sale Price $31.90

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Walton & Longman’s How to Read Job

Longman-Read Job_120 From John Walton and Tremper Longman, How to Read Job joins our other volumes on Genesis, Exodos, and Proverbs for gaining a proper sense of how the Old Testament book of Job should be read and understood.

True story: Less than a week ago my mother-in-law told me she often turns to the Book of Job for comfort when she faces disappointment in life. Now, if she reads Job because he had it much worse than her, that’s one thing; but I doubt that’s what she meant! People often turn to the Book of Job when they are suffering or grieving, but that may not be the best understanding of this book. In fact, the writers address this issue up front in their section “What Is the Book of Job All About?

It is not uncommon for people to turn to the book of Job when they encounter suffering, but all too often they find the book unsatisfying. They think that the book will explain why they or their loved ones are suffering or why there is so much suffering in the world. They have the impression that the book is about Job and that he is going to provide a model for how they should respond in times of suffering. They expect to learn why God acts the way that he does—why he allows or even causes righteous people to suffer. It is no wonder, then, that they find the book inadequate; their expectations are misguided.

Rethinking how we read the Book of Job should be incentive enough to add this title to your personal Accordance Library. If you don’t already have the other titles in the series, gain your greatest discount by purchasing all four titles together.

How to Read Job screenshot

Click/tap the image above for a larger look at How to Read Job (biblical texts not included)

How to Read Job
Regular Price $17.90

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If you already own the earlier 3-volume bundle, the custom upgrade to the 4-volume bundle will complete the set for you.

Bundle of Four "How to Read" Books
Regular Price $49.90
Sale Price $39.90

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Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible

Eerdmans Commentary_120 Most Accordance users have the excellent Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible since it is included in our Starter Collection. And some of you have also picked up the Eerdmans Companion to the Bible, which offers historical and background information. Now, we have released a third volume, Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible, and I believe that if you take a closer look, you’ll find it quite impressive.

One-volume commentaries are great for a “first stop” examination of a particular biblical passage. You can get quick understanding and background before moving on to a more in-depth work if necessary. However, most one-volume commentaries limit their coverage to the 66 books of the Protestant (or sometimes referred to as Common) Christian canon. Not so with the Eerdmans Commentary. In fact, to my knowledge, this is the most expansive one-volume biblical commentary available.

As one would assume, the Eerdmans Commentary contains all 66 books of the "Common" canon, all written by well-known biblical scholars. In addition to these, however, this volume contains complete coverage of Apocrypha/Deuterocanonical books, including content often overlooked such as 3-4 Maccabees and Psalm 151. And even beyond this, as far as I know, the Eerdmans Bible Commentary is the only one-volume commentary to include 1 Enoch in its coverage!

The Eerdmans Bible Commentary is easily the broadest collection of canonical books (as recognized by different faith expressions) covered in one volume, and a worthy addition to anyone’s personal Accordance Library.

Eerdmans Commentary screenshot

Click/tap the image above for a larger look at Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible (biblical and pseudepigraphal texts not included)

Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible
Regular Price $59.90
Sale Price $47.90

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