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#1 Dustin Battles

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 08:17 AM

The NIV Zondervan Study Bible was just announced on Andy Naselli's blog:

 

http://andynaselli.c...van-study-biblehttp://andynaselli.c...van-study-bible

 

Since Andy is a friend of mine (as well as former Greek teacher of mine), I would love to have this resource available in Accordance. I would highly recommend jumping on this quickly, as Andy is a big Logos user, so you can be certain it will be available for Logos very soon.

 

 


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#2 Rick Bennett

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 09:34 AM

As you know we have the majority of Zondervan's best resources, some of which are only available with us. This will probably come in time as well, but we aren't going to drop everything to do it.

 

Thanks for the recommendation and link.


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#3 Dan Wagner

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 10:07 PM

What happened to the old NIV study Bible? I have mine in Accordance and I like it. 



#4 Helen Brown

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 04:35 AM

It is still available for installation but we have not released it as a separate purchase since there are several newer Study Bibles from Zondervan.


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#5 Daniel Francis

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 01:06 PM

Looks interesting for sure, and I would consider purchasing it in Accordance.

 

dan


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#6 Dan Langston

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 04:47 PM

I just got a hardcopy and it promised "free digital access".  I was disappointed to see that Bible Gateway and Olive Tree were the only options.  Even Logos wasn't an option.  It could certainly help Accordance in their Marketing to be another option.  Here's a screenshot:

 

 

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#7 Daniel Francis

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 05:48 PM

Those options are both owned by HarperCollins, hence the reason they off it in their digital world.

 

-Dan


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#8 Dustin Battles

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 03:23 PM

This was just released. Any news on whether it will be available soon for Accordance? I would buy it ASAP.


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#9 Dustin Battles

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 01:08 PM

Apparently I’m not the only one to notice that this will be a big thing:

 

http://www.washingto...t-is/?tid=sm_tw


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#10 Emanuel Cardona

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 01:31 PM

Great study Bible. This study Bible will be my main Bible for the youth whose second language is English. Get a good basic and well-rounded theology using the notes of this study Bible that ground itself in biblical theology along with the notes of the ESV study Bible that ground itself in systematic theology.

In the love of God that is in Christ Jesus [En el amor de Dios que es en Cristo Jesús],


Emanuel Cardona

_______________

 

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#11 Daniel Francis

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 11:56 AM

Thank for the link Battlesman, i think this is worth repeating from the article:

 

  • "My aim is to help people read their Bibles with more understanding and self-application and more ability to read themselves and their culture and their churches in the light of God’s most holy word than they might otherwise be able to do,” said D.A. Carson, the general editor of the new “ NIV Zondervan Study Bible

​​And from what I have seen in my OT copy I would say they achieved their aim.

 

-Dan



#12 David Voth

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 06:51 PM

How is this version different from the previous NIV Study Bible?


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#13 Daniel Francis

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 07:29 PM

Here is NIVSB

(NIV SB Notes) Ps 1–2 These two “orphan” psalms (having no title) are bound together by framing clauses (“Blessed is the one … whose delight is in the law of the Lord”; “Blessed are all who take refuge in him”) that highlight their function as the introduction to the whole Psalter. Together they point on the one hand to God’s law and to the instruction of the wisdom teachers (Ps 1) and on the other hand to a central theme in the Prophets, both Former and Latter, namely, what Yahweh has committed himself to accomplish for and through his anointed king from the house of David (Ps 2). As the port of entry into the Psalter, these two psalms make clear that those who would find their own voice in the Psalms and so would appropriate them as testimonies to their own faith must fit the profile of those called “blessed” here. See also note on Ps 40–41.
Ps 1 Godly wisdom here declares the final outcome of the two “ways”: “the way that sinners take” (v. 1) and “the way of the righteous” (v. 6). See 34:19–22; Ps 37; see also essay. The psalmist develops three contrasts that set the righteous apart from the wicked: (1) as to their “way” of life (vv. 1–2); (2) as to the life condition they experience (“like a tree,” “like chaff,” vv. 3–4); and, climactically, (3) as to God’s judgment on their different ways (vv. 5–6). As part of the introduction to the Psalter, this psalm reminds the reader (1) that those of whom the Psalms speak (using various terms) as the people of God must be characterized by delight in God’s revealed will—those who stubbornly choose the way of sinners have no place among them (v. 5; see Ps 15; 24)—and (2) that the godly piety that speaks in the Psalms is a faithful response to God’s written directives for life—which is the path that leads to blessedness. For a prime indicator of the psalm’s central theme, cf. the first and last words, which frame the whole (“Blessed … destruction”).
1:1 Speaks progressively of association with the ungodly and participation in their ungodly ways. Blessed. The happy condition of those who revere the Lord and do his will (see 94:12; 112:1; 119:1–2; 128:1; Pr 29:18; cf. Ps 41:1; 106:3; Pr 14:21; Isa 56:2) and who put their trust in him (see 40:4; 84:5, 12; 144:15; 146:5; Pr 16:20; Isa 30:18; Jer 17:7; cf. Ps 2:12; 34:8). Reference is not first of all to health and wealth but to the assurance and experience that they live under the guardianship and faithful care of the gracious Lord of life. The Psalter begins by proclaiming the blessedness of the godly and ends by calling all living things to praise God in his earthly and heavenly sanctuaries (Ps 150). walk in step with the wicked. Order one’s life according to the deliberations and advice of the wicked (see Pr 1:10–19). stand. Position oneself. sinners. Those for whom wickedness is habitual—a way of life (see v. 5). sit. Settle oneself. mockers. Those who ridicule God and defiantly reject his law (see Pr 1:22 and note).
1:2 meditates on his law. Seeking guidance for life in God’s law rather than in the deliberations of the wicked. day and night. See Jos 1:8.
1:3 like a tree … does not wither. See Jer 17:8; a simile of the blessedness of the righteous. Such a tree withstands the buffeting of the winds and, flourishing, it blesses people and animals with its unfailing fruit and shade.
1:4 like chaff … blows away. A simile of the wretchedness of the wicked. Chaff is carried away by the lightest wind, and its removal brings about cleansing by extracting what is utterly useless (see note on Ru 1:22).
1:5 will not stand in the judgment. Will not be able to withstand God’s wrath when he judges (see 76:7; 130:3; Ezr 9:15; Na 1:6 and note; Mal 3:2; Mt 25:31–46; Rev 6:17). assembly. The worshiping assembly at God’s sanctuary (as in 22:25; 26:12; 35:18; 40:9–10; 111:1; 149:1; see Ps 15; 24). righteous. One of several terms in the OT for God’s people; it presents them as those who honor God and order their lives in all things according to his will.
1:6 way … way. What is here said of the two ways applies by implication also to those who choose them (see 37:20).

Here is ZNIVSB
(ZSB Notes) Study Notes
Pss 1-2 Introduction to the Psalter: The Righteous and the Wicked, The Lord and His King. The first two psalms of Book I introduce most of the great themes of the book of Psalms. These include the contrast between the two ways (that of the righteous versus that of the wicked), the importance of relying on God and his instructions, God’s sovereignty and rule over all people and nations (and his attendant concern for them), the interplay between divine and human kingship, and God as a place of refuge for all.
Although composed separately, the two psalms complement each other well:
Ps 1 presents the two “ways” on the level of the individual, while Ps 2 does so on the level of the nations. Ps 1 presents the ideal righteous individual, rooted in God’s Word, while Ps 2 highlights God’s chosen king, whose primary kingly duty was also to be rooted in God’s Word (Deut 17:18-20). Ps 1 begins with the blessedness (1:1) of the righteous individual rooted in God’s Word, while Ps 2 ends with the blessedness (2:12c) of all persons who take refuge in the Lord. Ps 1 speaks of the righteous one who “meditates” (hāgâ ) on God’s Word (1:2), while Ps 2 speaks of God’s enemies who “meditate” (hāgâ, which the NIV translates as “plot”) on rebellion (2:1). The difference in their focus (God’s Word versus rebellion) reveals the contrasts between the two types of people.
Ps 1 The Key to Success: Stay Rooted in God’s Word. This psalm succinctly contrasts the way of the righteous (vv. 1-3) and the way of the wicked (vv. 4-5), ending by concisely summarizing the two ways (v. 6). The righteous are “like a tree” (v. 3) and the wicked “like chaff” (v. 4); God’s word (the focal point of vv. 1-3) is missing in the life of the wicked (vv. 4-5 do not mention it). Because Ps 1 focuses on God’s word (or law or instruction: tōrâ ), some classify it as a “wisdom” psalm (see introduction to Ps 34). As such, it signals that rootedness in God’s instruction is the key to success in life.
1:1 Blessed. Hebrew ʾašrê; often translated “happy” or “fortunate.” It refers to how true happiness comes to those who refuse to identify with the way of the wicked but who instead are rooted in God’s word. (For the other main Hebrew word for blessing, see note on 3:8.) walk in step . . . stand . . . sit. These verbs of bodily motion are metaphors for the progressive internal attitudes and external behaviors of God’s enemies. The progression moves from casual identification (“walk in step”) to complete association (“sit”). The single righteous individual of vv. 1-3 contrasts with the many wicked ones in v. 1; that is, the righteous person is to stand out and away from the crowd.
1:2 The key to the psalm: success in life depends on saturation in God’s word. delight. The righteous person takes joy or pleasure in God’s word because of the inherently valuable qualities in it; this word elsewhere speaks of a person’s delight in other valuable objects, such as gold, a secure dwelling place, or even a man’s delight in a woman. law of the Lord. Some take this to refer to the law of Moses given in Deuteronomy, others to the larger body of Mosaic laws in Exodus to Deuteronomy, and still others to the entire Pentateuch. meditates. Here, one who delights in God’s law “meditates” on it day and night. Such an attitude is also at the heart of what the ideal Israelite king should display (Deut 17:18-20) as well as the key to Joshua’s leadership (Josh 1:7-8). The underlying idea is something audible. In the ancient world, reading was done aloud, so to “meditate” meant to read aloud and ponder.
1:3 tree planted by streams of water. The results of saturation in God’s word are found in a delightful horticultural image: a tree firmly rooted in well-watered soil (cf. Jer 17:5-8). they. A singular “they,” since its antecedent is singular, and it continues the image of the righteous individual standing out against the crowd that v. 1 introduces. prospers. Not financial well-being, but ultimate success in life when properly oriented to God and one’s relationship with him. It echoes God’s promise to Joshua in Josh 1:8 and also resembles Jesus’ words in Matt 6:33. Sometimes the blessing of the righteous is near in time (Gen 24:35; 1 Kgs 3:11-13); other times God’s people must wait for his timing (Hab 2:2-3; 3:16).
Attached File  image.jpg   251.55KB   1 downloads
Wall painting in the tomb of Sennedjem (Sinjin), Deir el-Medina, Thebes, shows a tree planted by water (Ps 1:3).
Richard Ashworth/Robert Harding/Glow Images

1:4 Not so the wicked! Contrasts with the final statement of v. 3: “whatever they do prospers.” chaff. Useless husks of grains such as wheat; blows away in the winnowing process; even the lightest wind will carry it away. This contrasts powerfully with the firmly rooted tree in v. 3.
1:5 the judgment . . . the assembly of the righteous. Represent the institutions of the community in Israel (for “judgment,” cf. Prov 2:22; for “assembly,” cf. Josh 20:9), although certainly the statements in v. 4 hold true for the final judgment as well (Eccl 12:14; Matt 5:5). See note on 40:9,10. Significantly, there is no trace of God’s word in the lives of the wicked (cf. v. 2).
1:6 A final, succinct contrast wraps up the psalm’s message. watches over. Or “knows,” a relational word used even for sexual union (e.g., “made love to” in Gen 4:1). The Lord has intimate knowledge and experience of the way of all “righteous” persons (the word is now plural); the flip side is that the way of the wicked leads to destruction (see note on 2:12).

 

-Dan

Both copied from OT on my iPad


Edited by Dan Francis, 01 September 2015 - 07:31 PM.


#14 Daniel Francis

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 08:18 PM

I do have 1985/2002 editions in Accordance, the above NIVSB is labeled 2011 (which I think is pretty close to the 2002 edition, and below is the 1985 edition for a complete comparison). 

 

Study Notes for Psalms

 
 
Chapter 1
 
Ps 1 Author and date unknown. Godly wisdom here declares the final outcome of the two “ways”: “the way of sinners” (v. 1) and “the way of the righteous” (v. 6). See 34:19-22; 37; Introduction to Proverbs: Wisdom Literature. As an introduction to the book, this psalm reminds the reader (1) that those of whom the Psalms speak (using various terms) as the people of God, those whom he receives in his presence and favors with his salvation and blessing, must be characterized by righteousness—sinners have no place among them (v. 5; see Ps 15; 24)—and (2) that the godly piety that speaks in the Psalms is a faithful response to God’s revealed (and written) directives for life—which is the path that leads to blessedness.
 
1:1 Speaks progressively of association with the ungodly and participation in their ungodly ways. Blessed. The happy condition of those who revere the Lord and do his will (see 94:12; 112:1; 119:1-2; 128:1; Pr 29:18; cf. Ps 41:1; 106:3; Pr 14:21; Isa 56:2), who put their trust in him (see 40:4; 84:5,12; 144:15; 146:5; Pr 16:20; Isa 30:18; Jer 17:7; cf. Ps 2:12; 34:8), and so are blessed by God (see especially 41:1-3; 144:12-14; see also Mt 5:3-12). The Psalter begins by proclaiming the blessedness of the godly and ends by calling all living things to praise God in his earthly and heavenly sanctuaries (Ps 150). walk in. Order his life according to. counsel. Deliberations and advice (see Pr 1:10-19). stand. Station oneself. sinners. See v. 5; those for whom evil is habitual, for whom wickedness is a way of life. sit. Settle oneself. mockers. Those who ridicule God and defiantly reject his law (see Pr 1:22).
 
1:2 on his law he meditates. Seeking guidance for life in God’s law rather than in the deliberations of the wicked. day and night. See Jos 1:8.
 
1:3 like a tree . . . does not wither. See Jer 17:8; a simile of the blessedness of the righteous. Such a tree withstands the buffeting of the winds and, flourishing, it blesses man, animals and birds with its unfailing fruit and shade.
 
1:4 like chaff . . . blows away. A simile of the wretchedness of the wicked. Chaff is carried away by the lightest wind, and its removal brings about cleansing by extracting what is utterly useless (see note on Ru 1:22).
 
1:5 will not stand in the judgment. Will not be able to withstand God’s wrath when he judges (see 76:7; 130:3; Ezr 9:15; Mal 3:2; Mt 25:31-46; Rev 6:17). assembly. The worshiping assembly at God’s sanctuary (as in 22:25; 26:12; 35:18; 40:9-10; 111:1; 149:1; see Ps 15; 24). righteous. One of several terms in the OT for God’s people; it presents them as those who honor God and order their lives in all things according to his will. In every human relationship they faithfully fulfill the obligations that the relationship entails, remembering that power and authority (of whatever sort: domestic, social, political, economic, religious, intellectual) are to be used to bless, not to exploit.
 
1:6 way . . . way. Implicit in the destinies of the two life-styles are also the destinies of those who choose them.
 
Kenneth Barker et al., eds. The NIV Study Bible. Accordance electronic ed. (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1985), n.p.

Edited by Dan Francis, 01 September 2015 - 08:28 PM.


#15 David Voth

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 10:44 AM

I was wondering in general how they compare in terms of what they contain. Is the one that just came out completely rewritten?


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#16 Daniel Francis

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 01:06 PM

The Zondervan one is a completely new study Bible with all new notes as I understand it. I would expect some of the language and phrasing to be similar if for no other reason than there are many of the same contributors. This is to such an extent that the centre cross references were completely redone for the zondervan one. from the sample you see above with Psalm 1 you can see there is virtually no overlapping and the ZSB even has colour photos in it (the 2011 version of the NIVSB does have 90 colour maps throughout the Bible). 

Q & A - NIV Zondervan Study Bible

 

Will give you some more information including the information that the NIV Study Bible will continue to be published and the ZSB is not designed to replace it.

 

-Dan



#17 David Voth

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 01:53 PM

Thanks for the info.


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#18 ukfraser

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 06:33 PM

Thanks dan, interesting link. I actually bought into accordance via the zondervan cd as i was looking for the original niv study bible for a mac. As i have said in other places, i am less than impressed by the zondervan bible atlas, so calling a study bible zondervan doesnt have any strong pull. I still find the jps and jewish annotated nt study bibles good value so not convinved i would get this and probably would prefer the oup oxford annotated bible and its companion commentary edited by muddiman.

It just seems a shame that oup are not very good to deal with!!!!

Edited by ukfraser, 02 September 2015 - 06:43 PM.

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#19 Larry Wing

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 01:52 PM

I'm interested in how their notes compare to, say, ESV Study Bible or Reformation Study Bible. Not necessarily the actual notes but how Biblical Theology notes compare to Systematic Notes. I know the difference but I just don't know how they differ in actual practice when writing study bible notes.



#20 Daniel Francis

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 03:15 PM

I'm interested in how their notes compare to, say, ESV Study Bible or Reformation Study Bible. Not necessarily the actual notes but how Biblical Theology notes compare to Systematic Notes. I know the difference but I just don't know how they differ in actual practice when writing study bible notes.

 

 

All come from a Evangelical spectrum.... the NIVSB/ZSB feels to me to be the most neutral in that most all spectrums of evangelicals contributed to it and it is aimed at all of them I believe the same could be said for ESVSB (although there were only two Wesleyan contributors I could see in it and it seemed very heavily weighted by Baptist scholars). The NIVSB/ZSB feels to me over all to be a bit more on the dispensational side of theology. And while the RSB will talk about dispensational interpretations of verses at times it is solidly in the historic traditions of  Biblical interpretation of Knox/Calvin. I really like the new ZSB and I do like the RSB although it is not always in line with my theological views (Anglican/Lutheran tradition). I for whatever reason never warmed up greatly to the  ESVSB (but this is likely due to my access to many in-depth commentaries). I suppose pressed hard to choose between the NIVSB, ZSB,  and the ESVSB I would go for the ESVSB, seeming to me to have more comprehensive notes and a little less biased to dispensationalism. In a choice between ESVSB and RSB it would be a very hard choice I throughly enjoy the theological nature of the RSB but the ESVSB gives a broader scope. I am not sure if I have helped you any in my musings but hope you can take something away from them to help you.

 

-Dan 






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