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Church Father's Commentaries (Dropdown reference selection)

Church Fathers Commentaries

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#1 Paul Raybould

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 06:30 AM

I typically read scripture on my iPad with 2 Panes. The top is the bible, and commentaries below. It is very powerful to include other's insights (and be able to switch between them). We often see references like this from Adam Clarke's Commentary on Hebrews 9:14. He obviously read older saints' writings, and many of them are now digitized - even as part of Accordance.
- - -
"... Cyril, Athanasius sometimes, Damascenus, Chrysostom, and some others. But the common reading is supported by ABD**, and others, besides the Syriac, all the Arabic, Armenian, AEthiopic, Athanasius generally, Theodouret, Theophylact, and ... "
- - -
I have Church Father's Collections / Modules and wondered if there is a way to reference their comments on verses in the same (or similar) way as we can switch between other commentaries?

Thanks in advance,
Paul

#2 Mark Allison

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 06:40 AM

There really isn't a way to do that with the traditional Church Fathers resources. The problem is that the Fathers never wrote in a commentary format, for the most part. However, there is a resource that attempts to do just what you've described, sorting through all the Church Fathers' comments on a particular passage, and organizing them in a commentary format. It's called the "Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture" and is available in Accordance:

 

http://www.accordanc...d=ACCS Complete



#3 R. Mansfield

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 06:44 AM

Paul, do you have the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture?

http://www.accordanc...d=ACCS Complete

Would this do what you're wanting to do?

Richard Mansfield

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#4 Daniel Francis

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 07:03 PM

I am not !00% sure what Paul wants, but I would like the ability to open up a secondary panel in works like the fathers this secondary panel need not even be overly flexible but I want to have the ability to have a Bible open with many works that currently are one resource only. For example in photo guide 4 rather than hoping open a pop up window for scriptures I would like to have 1/4 width panel i can open to read freely for context and other passages that pop to mind. Right now I do this by using accordance simultaneously on my iPhone and iPad but often it would be nice to have just my iPad.

 

-Dan



#5 Paul Raybould

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 10:10 AM

Thank you all for replying. I'll check the ACCS Complete.

Warm regards,

Paul

#6 Emanuel Cardona

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 02:56 PM

There really isn't a way to do that with the traditional Church Fathers resources. The problem is that the Fathers never wrote in a commentary format, for the most part. However, there is a resource that attempts to do just what you've described, sorting through all the Church Fathers' comments on a particular passage, and organizing them in a commentary format. It's called the "Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture" and is available in Accordance:
 
http://www.accordanc...d=ACCS Complete


Are the commentaries taken directly out of the 37-volume set of the Church Fathers?

In the love of God that is in Christ Jesus [En el amor de Dios que es en Cristo Jesús],


Emanuel Cardona

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#7 Daniel Francis

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 03:39 PM

The translations vary as you can see below...

 

Fathers of the Church: A New Translation. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 1947-.

 Arthur A. Just, Luke, vol. 3, Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture NT 3. (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2005).

 

Cyril of Alexandria. Commentary on the Gospel of St. Luke. Translated by R. Payne Smith. Long Island, N.Y.: Studion Publishers, Inc., 1983.

 Arthur A. Just, Luke, vol. 3, Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture NT 3. (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2005).

 

The double asterisk (**) indicates either that a new translation has been provided or that some extant translation has been significantly amended.

 Arthur A. Just, Luke, vol. 3, Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture NT 3. (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2005).

 

J. E. Rotelle, ed. The Works of St. Augustine: A Translation for the Twenty-First Century. Hyde Park, N.Y.: New City Press, 1990-.

 Arthur A. Just, Luke, vol. 3, Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture NT 3. (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2005).

 

And here is an actual selection for you to see and compare yourself.

 
18:10–13 The Parable
 
THE INFIRMITY OF OTHERS IS NOT A FIT SUBJECT FOR PRAISE FOR THOSE IN GOOD HEALTH. CYRIL OF ALEXANDRIA: What profit is there in fasting twice in the week if it serves only as a pretext for ignorance and vanity and makes you proud, haughty and selfish? You tithe your possessions and boast about it. In another way, you provoke God’s anger by condemning and accusing other people because of this. You are puffed up, although not crowned by the divine decree for righteousness. On the contrary, you heap praises on yourself. He says, “I am not as the rest of humankind.” Moderate yourself, O Pharisee. Put a door and lock on your tongue.2 You speak to God who knows all things. Wait for the decree of the judge. No one who is skilled in wrestling ever crowns himself. No one also receives the crown from himself but waits for the summons of the referee.… Lower your pride, because arrogance is accursed and hated by God. It is foreign to the mind that fears God. Christ even said, “Do not judge, and you shall not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned.”3 One of his disciples also said, “There is one lawgiver and judge. Why then do you judge your neighbor?”4 No one who is in good health ridicules one who is sick for being laid up and bedridden. He is rather afraid, for perhaps he may become the victim of similar sufferings. A person in battle, because another has fallen, does not praise himself for having escaped from misfortune. The weakness of others is not a suitable subject for praise for those who are in health. COMMENTARY ON LUKE, HOMILY 120.5
 
THE DANGERS OF PRIDE. MARTYRIUS: Whoever offers to God sacrifices of praise, the rational fruits of the lips that confess his name, should be very alert for the ambushes of the evil one. Satan lies in ambush ready to catch you by surprise at the very time of thanksgiving. He will get up and accuse you before God, just as he did with your fellow Pharisee in the temple. This time, he will not be puffing you up with pride over good works, as he did with the Pharisee, but he will be making you drunk with a different kind of pride. He makes you drunk on pride in the lovely and sweet sound of your own voice, the beauty of your chants that are sweeter than honey and the honey-comb. The result is that you do not realize that these belong to God, and not to yourself. BOOK OF PERFECTION 78.6
 
ON REPORTING ONE’S OWN SYMPTOMS, NOT ANOTHER’S, TO A DOCTOR. AUGUSTINE: How useful and necessary a medicine is repentance! People who remember that they are only human will readily understand this. It is written, “God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble.”7 … The Pharisee was not rejoicing so much in his own clean bill of health as in comparing it with the diseases of others. He came to the doctor. It would have been more worthwhile to inform him by confession of the things that were wrong with himself instead of keeping his wounds secret and having the nerve to crow over the scars of others. It is not surprising that the tax collector went away cured, since he had not been ashamed of showing where he felt pain. SERMON 351.1.8
 
THE PUBLICAN RECEIVES ABSOLUTION. CYRIL OF ALEXANDRIA: It says that the tax collector “stood afar off,” not even venturing to raise up his eyes. You see him abstaining from all boldness of speech. He seems devoid of the right to speak and beaten down by the scorn of conscience. He was afraid that God would see him, since he had been careless in keeping his laws and had led an unchaste and uncontrolled life. You also see that he accuses his own depravity by his external manner. The foolish Pharisee stood there bold and broad, lifting up his eyes without a qualm, bearing witness of himself and boastful. The other feels shame for his conduct. He is afraid of his judge. He beats his breast. He confesses his offenses. He shows his illness as to the Physician, and he prays that he will have mercy. What is the result? Let us hear what the judge says. He says, “This man went down to his house justified rather than the other.” COMMENTARY ON LUKE, HOMILY 120.9
 
IT IS MORE DIFFICULT TO CONFESS ONE’S SINS THAN ONE’S RIGHTEOUSNESS. EPHREM THE SYRIAN: In the case of that Pharisee who was praying, the things he said were true. Since he was saying them out of pride and the tax collector was telling his sins with humility, the confession of sins of the last was more pleasing to God than the acknowledgment of the almsgiving of the first. It is more difficult to confess one’s sins than one’s righteousness. God looks on the one who carries a heavy burden. The tax collector therefore appeared to him to have had more to bear than the Pharisee had. He went down more justified than the Pharisee did, only because of the fact he was humble. If this Pharisee had been sinful, his prayer would have added iniquity to iniquity, but the Lord purified the tax collector of his iniquity. If just by praying, the Pharisee’s prayer provoked God’s wrath, then as a result of that provocation, the prayer of the tax collector proved all the more potent. COMMENTARY ON TATIAN’S DIATESSARON 15.24.10
 
 
 
 
18:14 The Conclusion
 
HUMILITY IS THE MARK OF A SINNER. BASIL THE GREAT: The stern Pharisee, who in his overweening pride not only boasted of himself but also discredited the tax collector in the presence of God, made his justice void by being guilty of pride. Instead of the Pharisee, the tax collector went down justified, because he had given glory to God, the holy One. He did not dare lift his eyes but sought only to plead for mercy. He accused himself by his posture, by striking his breast, and by entertaining no other motive except propitiation. Be on your guard, therefore, and bear in mind this example of severe loss sustained through arrogance. The one guilty of insolent behavior suffered the loss of his justice and forfeited his reward by his bold self-reliance. He was judged inferior to a humble man and a sinner because in his self-exaltation he did not await the judgment of God but pronounced it himself. Never place yourself above anyone, not even great sinners. Humility often saves a sinner who has committed many terrible transgressions. ON HUMILITY.11
 
 
Arthur A. Just, Luke, vol. 3, Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture NT 3. (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2005), 279–280.
 
 

-dan







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