Jump to content


Photo

New search for Conditional Clauses

Adjunct Clause Conditional Clause reality

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

    Gold

  • Accordance
  • 255 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, Italy
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 November 2015 - 12:55 PM

In Accordance, even without the syntax add-on the GNT-T module allows us to search for conjunctions: in the Search Text window, we can enter a group of conjunctions, let's say conditional conjunctions. We may write by hand:

ει <OR> εαν <OR> ειπερ

Or we may use the "Enter Tag" search command, as follows:

  1. Open the Search Text window
  2. From the Menu Search, select Enter Tag, then choose Conjunction
  3. When prompted, select Subclass conditional, then press Return or click OK
  4. Press Return or click on the Search button to perform the search

 

The results will show all the verses that contain one of the conditional conjunctions. In order to know what conjunctions were found, we can click on the Details menu, and choose Analysis.

Now enters the syntax add-on.

 

In the GNT-T syntax add-on, circumstantial (also called adverbial) Clauses are an important subset of Adjunct Clauses, namely those that depend on a Predicate Phrase. Among circumstantial Clauses we can find such well-known sub-classes of Clauses as causal Clauses, temporal Clauses, purpose Clauses, result Clauses, and so on.

Using the Greek Construct window, the syntax allows us to have a conditional conjunction introduce an Adjunct Dependent Clause. The conjunction will be the first element of the Clause.

We will build the search as follows:

  1. Open a new Search Text, choose GNT28-T as search text, and choose to search for Words (not Verses) within every Chapter or Book (not Verse, etc)
  2. Open a new Greek Construct (Command-2), that will be automatically linked with the Search Text
  3. In the Greek Construct window, select the green Syntax item CLAUSE, drag and drop it into the first column
  4. When prompted, choose Dependent clause only, then Adjunct only
  5. Select the purple item Conj, then drag and drop it into the first column of the Adjun. Dependent Clause
  6. When prompted, choose Subclass: conditional, then click OK or press Return
  7. Press Return or click on the Search button to perform the search

 

The results will look like this:

Attached File  All conditional Clauses.PNG   606.68KB   0 downloads


Edited by Marco V. Fabbri, 22 November 2015 - 01:27 PM.

  • Fabian likes this
Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy

#2 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

    Gold

  • Accordance
  • 255 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, Italy
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 November 2015 - 01:23 PM

We can now refine our search in order to look for specific sets of conditional clauses. We know that Tense or Mood of the Verb determine what kind of condition we have: real, potential, expected or unreal (see Blass-Debrunner-Funk §§ 371-373).

If the Verb takes the Present or Perfect Indicative, the emphasis will be on the reality of the assumption. We will use the general search for conditional clauses, as described in the first post, and we will modify it as follows:

  1. In the Greek Construct window, drag the purple element Verb and drop it into the second column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause
  2. When prompted, click to choose Tense: perfect 
  3. In the same prompt window, Shift-click to choose: Tense: present (Shift-click allows us to choose more than one tense at a time)
  4. In the same prompt window, click to choose Mood: Indicative 
  5. Close the prompt window clicking OK or pressing Return
  6. Press Return or click on the Search button to perform the search

The results will look like this:

 

Attached File  Conditional Dependent, Real.PNG   608.28KB   0 downloads


Edited by Marco V. Fabbri, 22 November 2015 - 03:27 PM.

  • Fabian likes this
Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy

#3 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

    Gold

  • Accordance
  • 255 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, Italy
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 November 2015 - 01:31 PM

If we want to find instead unreal conditions, we will need to keep the indicative mood and modify the tense to imperfect, aorist or pluperfect.

We will use the general search for conditional clauses, as described in the first post, and we will modify it as follows:

  1. In the Greek Construct window, drag the purple element Verb and drop it into the second column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause
  2. When prompted, click to choose Tense: imperfect 
  3. In the same prompt window, Shift-click to choose: Tense: aorist (Shift-click allows us to choose more than one tense at a time)
  4. In the same prompt window, Shift-click to choose: Tense: pluperfect
  5. In the same prompt window, click to choose Mood: Indicative 
  6. Close the prompt window clicking OK or pressing Return
  7. Press Return or click on the Search button to perform the search

The result will look like this:

 

Attached File  Conditional Clauses, unreal.PNG   642.48KB   0 downloads

Edited by Marco V. Fabbri, 22 November 2015 - 01:50 PM.
attaching image

  • Fabian likes this
Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy

#4 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

    Gold

  • Accordance
  • 255 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, Italy
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 November 2015 - 01:48 PM

If we want to find instead potential conditions, we will need to select the optative mood. There is no need to select a tense.

 

We will modify the search window that we prepared to search for all conditional clauses.

  1. In the Greek Construct window, drag the purple element Verb and drop it into the second column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause
  2. When prompted, click to choose Mood: Optative 
  3. Close the prompt window clicking OK or pressing Return
  4. Press Return or click on the Search button to perform the search

 

The result will look like this:

 

Attached File  Conditional Clauses, potential.PNG   515.13KB   0 downloads


Edited by Marco V. Fabbri, 22 November 2015 - 01:49 PM.

  • Fabian likes this
Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy

#5 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

    Gold

  • Accordance
  • 255 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, Italy
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 22 November 2015 - 01:54 PM

If we want to find insteaexpected conditions, we will need to change the mood the to the subjunctiveThere is no need to select a tense.

 

We will use the general search for conditional clauses, as described in the first post, and we will modify it as follows:

  1. In the Greek Construct window, drag the purple element Verb and drop it into the second column of the Adjun. DEPENDENT Clause
  2. When prompted, click to choose Mood: Subjunctive 
  3. Close the prompt window clicking OK or pressing Return
  4. Press Return or click on the Search button to perform the search

The result will look like this:

 

Attached File  Conditional Clauses, expected.PNG   612.22KB   0 downloads


Edited by Marco V. Fabbri, 22 November 2015 - 01:55 PM.

Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy

#6 rwrobinson88

rwrobinson88

    Silver

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 181 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peoria, Illinois
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X

Posted 22 November 2015 - 05:51 PM

Marco,

 

Can you give a reference to where you've taken this language from (adjunct, complement, predicate, etc.) instead of the normal language you would expect? 

 

I think understanding adjunct and complement and some those concepts would help more in understanding this syntax module. 

 

Thanks!



#7 דָנִיאֶל

דָנִיאֶל

    Ruby

  • Super Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,480 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, Windows, Android

Posted 22 November 2015 - 06:11 PM

Have you seen http://www.accordanc...with Syntax.pdf? This is admittedly due for an update with recent changes but it does give brief definitions for terms.

 

Thx

D


Sola lingua bona est lingua mortua
ἡ μόνη ἀγαθὴ γλῶσσα γλῶσσα νεκρὰ ἐστιν
lišanu ēdēnitu damqitu lišanu mītu

"Du stammst vom Herrn Adam und der Herrin Eva ab", sagte Aslan. "Und das ist zugleich Ehre genug, um das Häupt des ärmsten Bettlers zu erheben, und genug, um die Schultern des größten Kaisers auf Erden zu beugen. Sei zufrieden." Aslan, Die Chroniken von Narnia, Prinz Kaspian von Narnia. CS Lewis. Übersetzt von Wolfgang Holbein und Christian Rendel.

Accordance Syntax Search For Wallace's Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics : https://github.com/4...WallaceInSyntax

 

Accordance Crib Sheets: http://47rooks.com/l...ch-crib-sheets/

 

 

Accordance Configurations :

Mac : 2009 27" iMac
12GB RAM

Windows : MSI GE72 7RE Apache Pro laptop
Intel Core Duo Intel i7 Kabylake

Android : Samsung Note III 5.0, Samsung Tab S3 7.0 and Lenovo TAB4 8" 7.1


#8 rwrobinson88

rwrobinson88

    Silver

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 181 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peoria, Illinois
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X

Posted 22 November 2015 - 09:42 PM

Yeah. I've seen that. A little more depth into this framework. The terminology is clearly not the norm. Who came up with these terms? Why approach it this way?

I know this is similar terms to that of Some guys into SFL. Is it that area of linguistics?

Just seeking some background to the framework chosen. :) thanks!

#9 דָנִיאֶל

דָנִיאֶל

    Ruby

  • Super Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,480 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, Windows, Android

Posted 22 November 2015 - 10:14 PM

Ok, so some time back I asked this same sort of question in this posting http://www.accordanc...+little +theory

 

I still don't believe I understand enough of the background theory underlying the syntax modules but that thread gave some things to work on. I am yet to do much of it though yet.

 

Thx

D


Sola lingua bona est lingua mortua
ἡ μόνη ἀγαθὴ γλῶσσα γλῶσσα νεκρὰ ἐστιν
lišanu ēdēnitu damqitu lišanu mītu

"Du stammst vom Herrn Adam und der Herrin Eva ab", sagte Aslan. "Und das ist zugleich Ehre genug, um das Häupt des ärmsten Bettlers zu erheben, und genug, um die Schultern des größten Kaisers auf Erden zu beugen. Sei zufrieden." Aslan, Die Chroniken von Narnia, Prinz Kaspian von Narnia. CS Lewis. Übersetzt von Wolfgang Holbein und Christian Rendel.

Accordance Syntax Search For Wallace's Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics : https://github.com/4...WallaceInSyntax

 

Accordance Crib Sheets: http://47rooks.com/l...ch-crib-sheets/

 

 

Accordance Configurations :

Mac : 2009 27" iMac
12GB RAM

Windows : MSI GE72 7RE Apache Pro laptop
Intel Core Duo Intel i7 Kabylake

Android : Samsung Note III 5.0, Samsung Tab S3 7.0 and Lenovo TAB4 8" 7.1


#10 rwrobinson88

rwrobinson88

    Silver

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 181 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peoria, Illinois
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X

Posted 23 November 2015 - 09:19 AM

ahhh gotcha. Thanks.

 

The terminology is the same as opentext.org's and they have some articles on their website that were helpful.

 

I know it isn't exactly the same, but similar enough.



#11 Marco V. Fabbri

Marco V. Fabbri

    Gold

  • Accordance
  • 255 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, Italy
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 23 November 2015 - 11:31 AM

I think you may also find that the linked internet Grammar of English is useful.


Marco Valerio Fabbri
P. Università della S. Croce
Rome, Italy

#12 John Fidel

John Fidel

    Gold

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Accordance Version:12.x
  • Platforms:Mac OS X, iOS

Posted 23 November 2015 - 11:33 AM

Thanks for the new searches Marco! On a side note, I am still missing a few NT books in my Syntax tools. Was working in Hebrews and noted the syntax was not available. Any update on when the remaining NT books will be finished? Keep up the great work.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Adjunct Clause, Conditional Clause, reality

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users