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Greek Diagram module — Mark 1:5

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#1 Ιακοβ

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 05:50 PM

I've been thoroughly enjoying the greek diagram module, its certainly helping me learn how to diagram.  I noticed the following today:
 
Attached File  Screen Shot 2016-12-27 at 9.42.13 am.png   13.1KB   1 downloads
 
When there are two nouns (in apposition?) like this, is the equals sign the only way to represent the text? Or, is this also legitimate:
 
Attached File  FullSizeRender.jpg   55.72KB   0 downloads
 
Merry Christmas!

 

PS: Is there a way to increase the size of images when you attach them? They come out a little to small on my screen.

Attached Files


Edited by Ιακοβ, 26 December 2016 - 05:54 PM.

My top 5 feature requests:
  1. 15pt font size for reading text (bible, journal articles, commentaries, etc...)
  2. Improved searching for Journal articles. (So we can search for journal article by verse + english text)
  3. Display Journal titles in journal search results. (Imagine a google search where you saw the page text but no headings?)
  4. Improved greek text search—i.e. allow searching of all greek text the same way you would search LXX+NT, i.e. LXX+NT+ApocFathers+etc...
  5. Phrase (sympathetic) highlighting.

#2 דָנִיאֶל

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 06:20 PM

Your images rendered fine for me.

The syntax diagrams consider ποταμῷ to be an appositive. Not sure I wouldn't have treated Ἰορδανῳ as the appositive but there you go. I'll have to look into that one.

 

I don't know sentence diagramming so cannot much comment on the rest of your post I'm afraid.

 

Thx

D


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#3 Steve Lo Vullo

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 07:26 PM

Hi Jacob:

 

I use the equals sign for two basic purposes: to depict apposition and, much less frequently, pleonasm. I think the equals sign should always be used for apposition. In your handwritten diagram, the symbol you are using instead of the equals sign would indicate that the word with that symbol is a modifier or qualifier of the word with which it is associated but is not the same person or thing as that which it modifies or qualifies. An appositive, on the other hand, doesn't modify or qualify the word with which it is associated, but is the same person or thing as that word, and "piggy-backs" on that word in order to bring clarification to it. Apposition isn't really a syntactical category at all, since the appositive refers to the same person or thing as the word with which it is in apposition and has the same syntactical relation to the rest of the clause. The appositive simply clarifies the first substantive. If you were to take away one or the other, the sentence or clause would still make perfect syntactical sense, since both words refer to the same person or thing, are in the same case, and have the same syntactical relation to the rest of the clause.

 

I think you mentioned before that you have Wallace's grammar. He has sections on simple apposition for each of the cases, and I think you may find them interesting. For the nominative, pp. 48-49; for the vocative, pp. 70-71; for the genitive, pp. 94-100; for the dative, pp. 152-153; for the accusative, pp. 198-199. For the genitive he has two sections and contrasts the genitive in simple apposition with the genitive of apposition, so the treatment of the genitive is longer and more involved.

 

Keep up the good work! It's great to hear that you are enjoying the diagrams and even better that you are diagramming yourself.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Steve 


Edited by Steve Lo Vullo, 26 December 2016 - 07:37 PM.

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#4 Ιακοβ

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 03:40 AM

Thanks so much for your extremely helpful and detailed reply, including a reference to Wallace! I would never have known were to look to read further. I am not afraid of grammatical terms, but I can't imagine sitting down and reading Wallace from front to end—However, when I come across a context (such as this question) that provides a practical reason why to dig into it it spurs me on!

 

Thanks!


My top 5 feature requests:
  1. 15pt font size for reading text (bible, journal articles, commentaries, etc...)
  2. Improved searching for Journal articles. (So we can search for journal article by verse + english text)
  3. Display Journal titles in journal search results. (Imagine a google search where you saw the page text but no headings?)
  4. Improved greek text search—i.e. allow searching of all greek text the same way you would search LXX+NT, i.e. LXX+NT+ApocFathers+etc...
  5. Phrase (sympathetic) highlighting.





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