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#1 R. Mansfield

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Posted 14 May 2018 - 06:20 PM

New for the Accordance Bible Software Library: 17 “classic” volumes of the INTERNATIONAL CRITICAL COMMENTARY. Get discounted introductory pricing for a limited time.

 
For more information, please see today’s blog post.
 
Accordance 12 screenshot:
 
ICC.png?dl=1

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Rick Mansfield

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#2 Jonathan C. Borland

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 01:17 AM

Just purchased. So glad to have this (at least the NT volumes) in Accordance.


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#3 Roman Mazur

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Posted 18 May 2018 - 02:22 AM

+1 - Roman



#4 Alistair

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Posted 18 May 2018 - 10:14 AM

I think it is misleading to use the cover artwork for the newer ICC volumes to represent these older commentaries, which would have been published in hardback. 

 

See https://www.accordan...ils/?pid=ICC-NT.

 

The image here https://www.accordan...com/Classic-ICCis more accurate.


Edited by Alistair, 18 May 2018 - 10:15 AM.


#5 R. Mansfield

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Posted 18 May 2018 - 10:34 AM

I think it is misleading to use the cover artwork for the newer ICC volumes to represent these older commentaries, which would have been published in hardback. 

 

Well, one could make the case, I suppose, that we shouldn’t show any image of books at all since we don’t sale physical content, but rather data based on physical content in regard to our titles adapted from print books. However, the book covers and images of book sets are merely used to be representative of the product.

 

Our use of the ICC cover on the product page would definitely be misleading if we let the purchaser think that we were offering the newer volumes. However, we’ve really tried to emphasize on both the product page and the blog post that these are the public domain titles. A front cover image is difficult; if we were true to the original bindings, we would have to display a green rectangle. The standard template for our product pages gives space to display a rectangular cover, not a set of books like I used on the blog post. 

 

Again, we’ve emphasized that these are the original titles. I would hope no one would be confused about what we are offering based on that the image on the product page, which even includes an original author’s name. 


Rick Mansfield

Technology Evangelist

Accordance Bible Software

 

Gear for Running Accordance:

 

macOS

2014 Mac Mini - 2.6 Ghz dual core Intel Core i5, 8 GB RAM, 1 TB HDD, macOS High Sierra

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Windows

2018 10" Microsoft Surface Go - 1.6 Ghz Pentium Gold, 8 GB RAM, 128 GB SSD, Windows 10 Pro

+ Parallels install of Windows 10 Pro on the above MacBook Pro

 

iOS

2018 iPhone XS Max - 256 GB, T-Mobile, iOS 12.x

2016 iPad Pro (12.9”) - 256 GB, T-Mobile, iOS 12.x

 

Android 

2017 Amazon Fire HD 8 - 32 GB internal + 64 GB microSD, Fire OS 5.6 (=Android OS 5.x)

2017 Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 - 128 GB internal, Android OS 8.0

2017 Blu Grand M - 8 GB internal + 64 GB microSD, Android OS 6.0


#6 Daniel Francis

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Posted 18 May 2018 - 03:46 PM

All my classic volumes in Logos have that style cover because they are still published and it is the current cover. Sometimes I will say I miss older cover art that I am use to. ISBE Revised original black and tan better than current light blue on navy blue. But in the end covers don't matter content does. And as long as Accordance makes no misleading claims I am happy.

 

-dan



#7 Mark Allison

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 09:44 AM

Sometimes the issue is finding an older cover image that looks good. If anyone has a copy of an older volume and wants to scan it and send it to me, we'll try to use it.



#8 Larry Wing

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 09:53 AM

Can anyone tell me the tone and details of this set?  IE, scholarly, detailed, general information (as in found in other commentary sets), etc?



#9 Daniel Francis

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 11:14 AM

Very in-depth, highly scholarly, critical. Exceptionally well done. But I do not use it too much being a bit too technical for me. I can glean a little from it but it is written for a more scholarly mind than mine.

 

-dan

 

Here is a brief sample from Luke:

 

38–42. § The Two Sisters of Bethany. That this incident took place at Bethany can hardly be doubted. If the sisters had of yet settled at Bethany, the place could hardly have been called ἡ κώμη Μαρίας καὶ Μάρθας (Jn. 11:1). Jesus is on His way to or from a short visit to Jerusalem which Lk. does not mention. He perhaps inserts it here as a further answer to the question, “What must one do to inherit eternal life?” Mere benevolence, such as that of the Samaritan, is not enough. It must be united with, and be founded upon, habitual communion with the Divine. “The enthusiasm of humanity,” if divorced from the love of God is likely to degenerate into mere serving of tables. But the narrative may be here in its true chronological position. It is one of the most exquisite among the treasures which Lk. alone has preserved; and the coincidence between it and Jn. 11 with regard to the characters of the two sisters, the incidents being totally different, is strong evidence of the historical truth of both.1 Comp. for both thought and language 1 Cor. 7:34, 35.

38. Ἐν δὲ τῷ πορεύεσθαι αὐτούς. “Now during their journeyings”: see on 3:21. As Lk. does not name the village, we may conjecture that he did not know where this occurred. One does not see how the mention of Bethany would have put the sisters in danger of persecution from the Jerusalem Jews. If that danger existed, the names of the sisters ought to have been suppressed.

γυνὴ δέ τις ὀνόματι Μάρθα ὑπεδέξατο αὐτόν. She was evidently the mistress of the house, and probably the elder sister. That she was a widow, is pure conjecture. That she was the wife of Simon the leper, is an improbable conjecture (Jn. 12:1, 2). The names Martha, Eleazar (Lazarus), and Simon have been found in an ancient cemetery at Bethany. The coincidence is curious, whatever may be the explanation. Martha was not an uncommon name. Marias used to take about with him a Syrian woman named Martha, who was said to have the gift of prophecy (Plut. Mar. 414), It means “lady” or “mistress”: κυρία. For ὀνόματι see on 5:27, and for ὑποδέχομαι comp. 19:6; Acts 17:7; Jas. 2:25. The verb occurs nowhere else in N.T.

εἰς τὴν οἰκίαν. This is probably the right reading, of which εἰς τὸν οἶκον αὐτῆς is the interpretation. Even without αὐτῆς there can be little doubt that Martha’s house is meant.

39. ἣ καὶ παρακαθεσθεῖσα πρὸς τοὺς πόδας. The καὶ can hardly be “even,” and the meaning “also” is not clear. Perhaps “Martha gave Him a welcome, and Mary also expressed her devotion in her own way,” is the kind of thought; or, “Mary joined in the welcome, and also sat at His feet.” The meal has not yet begun, for Martha is preparing it; and Mary is not sitting at table with Him, but at His feet as His disciple (Acts 22:3). For τοῦ Κυρίου see on 5:17 and 7:13. The verb is class., but the 1 aor. part. is late Greek (Jos. Ant. vi. 11, 9). Note the imperf. ἤκουεν: she continued to listen. Comp. 1 Cor. 7:35.

40. περιεσπᾶτο. “Was drawn about in different directions, distracted.” The word forms a marked contrast to παρακαθεσθεῖσα. Comp. Eccles. 1:13, 3:10, 5:19; Ecclus. 41:4.

ἐπιστᾶσα δὲ εἶπεν, Κύριε. “And she came up and said”: see on 2:38, Cov, has “steple unto Him.” Other Versions previous to AV. have “stood.” The word perhaps indicates an impatient movement. Her temper is shown in her addressing the rebuke to Him rather than to her sister. Her saying ἡ ἀδελφή μου instead of Μαριάμ is argumentum quasi ab iniquo (Beng.), and μόνην is placed first for emphasis. The imperf, κατέλειπεν expresses the continuance of the neglect. The word does not imply that Mary began to help and then left off, but that she ought to have helped, and from the first abstained. D.C.G. art. “Martha.”

For εἰπὸν … ἵνα comp. Mk. 3:9, and for ἀντιλαμβάνω see on 1:54. Here the meaning of συναντ. is “take hold along with me, help me.” Comp Rom. 8:26; Exod. 18:22; Ps. 89:22. See Field, Otium Norvic. iii. p. 44.

41. Μάρθα, Μάρθα, μεριμνᾷς. The repetition of the name conveys an expression of affection and concern: 22:31; Acts 9:4; Mt. 7:21. Comp. Mk. 14:36; Rom. 8:15; Gal. 4:6, and see on 8:24.1 The verb is a strong one, “thou art anxious,” and implies division and distraction of mind (μερίζω), which believers ought to avoid: Mt. 6:25, 28, 31, 34; Lk. 12:11, 22, 26; Phil. 4:6. Comp. μέριμνα, 8:14, 21:34, and especially 1 Pet. 5:7, where human anxiety (μέριμνα) is set against Divine Providence (μέλει).

καὶ θορυβάζῃ. “And art in a tumult, bustle.” The readings, vary much, and certainty is not obtainable, respecting the central portion of Christ’s rebuke. The form θορυβάζομαι seems to occur nowhere else: τυρβάζω is fairly common: περὶ ταύτας τυρβάζεσθαι (Aristoph. Pax. 1007). An unusual word would be likely to be changed into a familiar one. In any case μεριμνᾷς refers to the mental distraction, and the second verb to the external agitation. Martha complains of having no one to help her; but it was by her own choice that she had so much to do.

The difference between θορυβάζῃ (א B C D L) and τυρβάζῃ (A R) is unimportant: the question is as to the words which ought to stand between Μάρθα and Μαριάμ. As regards the first part the decision is not difficult. Nearly all Greek MSS. have μεριμνᾷς καὶ θορυβάζῃ (or τυρβάζῃ) περὶ πόλλα after Μάρθα, and have γάρ or δέ after Μαριάμ or Μαρία. But on the evidence of certain Latin authorities (a b e ff2 i Amb.) the Revisers and WH. give a place in the margin to θορυβάζῃ only after Μάρθα, with neither γάρ nor δέ after Μαριάμ: and these same authorities with D omit all that lies between θορυβάζῃ and Μαριάμ. This curt abrupt reading may be rejected. It is less easy to determine the second part. We may reject ὀλίγων δέ ἐστιν χρεία χρεία, which has very little support. Both this reading and ἐνὸς δέ ἐστιν χρεία (A C1 P Γ Δ Π) are probably corruptions of ὀλίγων δέ ἐστιν χρεία ἤ ἐνός (א B C2 L). The last might be a conflate reading from the other two, if the evidence did not show that it is older than ὀλίγων δέ ἐστιν χρεία: it is found in Boh. and Aeth. and also in Origen. See Sanday, App. ad N.T. p. 119. Syr-Sin. has “Martha, Martha, Mary hath chosen for herself the good part, which,” etc.

ὀλίγων δέ ἐστιν χρεία ἢ ἑνός. The ὀλίγων is opposed to περὶ πολλά, and ἑνός has a double meaning, partly opposed to περὶ πολλά, partly anticipatory of the ἀγαθὴ μερίς. There was no need of an elaborate meal; a few things, or one, would suffice.1 Indeed only one portion was necessary;—that which Mary had chosen. Both χρεία and μερίς are used of food; τὰ πρὸς τὴν χρείαν being necessaries as distinct from τὰ πρὸς τὴν τρυφήν. For μερίς as a “portion” of food comp. Gen. 43:34; Deut. 18:8; 1 Sam. 1:4, 9:23; Neh. 8:12, 12:47; Eccles. 11:2. For μερίς in the higher sense comp. Κύριος ἡ μερὶς τῆς κληρονομίας μου (Ps. 15:5). See also Ps. 73:26, 119:57, 142:5; Lam. 3:24; Ps. Sol. 5:6, 14:3.

Neither ὀλίγων nor ἐνός can be masc., because the opposition is to πολλά And if the meaning were “Few people are wanted for serving, or only one,” we should require μιᾶς as only women are mentioned.

42. Μαριὰμ γάρ. Explanation of ἑνός, and hence the γάρ. Not many things are needed, but only one, as Mary’s conduct shows.

The γάρ (א B L Λ) would easily be smoothed into δέ (A C P), or omitted as difficult (D). Versions and Fathers support all three readings. WH. and RV. adopt γάρ.

τὴν ἀγαθὴν μερίδα. “The good part.” No comparison is stated; but it is implied that Martha’s choice is inferior. In comparison with Mary’s it cannot be called “the good part,” or “the one thing” necessary, although it is not condemned as bad. Her distracting anxiety was the outcome of affection. Ecce pars, Marthæ non reprehenditur, sed Mariæ laudatur (Bede). Confirmata Mariæ immunitas (Beng.). Comp. Jn. 6:27.

ἥτις οὐκ ἀφαιρεθήσεται αὐτῆς. “Which is of such a character as not to be taken away from her.” Activa vita cum corpore deficit. Quis enim in æterna patria panem esurienti porrigat, ubi nemo sitit? quis mortuum sepeliat, ubi nemo moritur? Contemplativa autem hic incipitur, ut in cælesti patria perficiatur (Greg. Magn. in Ezech. ii. 34).

The omission of the prep. before the gen. (א B D L, ei a e, illi b i l q) is unusual. Hence A C R Γ Δ etc. insert ἀπʼ before αὐτῆς (ab ea Vulg. f).

In this narrative of the two sisters in the unnamed village Lk. unconsciously supplies historical support to the Johannine account of the raising of Lazarus. If that miracle is to be successfully discredited, it is necessary to weaken the support which this narrative supplies. The Tübingen school propose to resolve it into a parable, in which Martha represents Judaic Christianity, with its trust in the works of the Law; while Mary represents Pauline Christianity, reposing simply upon faith. Or, still more definitely, Martha is the impulsive Peter, Mary the philosophic Paul. But this is quite incredible. Even Lk. has not the literary skill to invent so exquisite a story for any purpose whatever. And Martha was not occupied with legal ceremonial, but with service in honour of Christ. This service was not condemned: it was her excitement and fault-finding my were rebuked. The story, whether an invention or not, is ill adapted to the purpose which is assumed as the cause of is production.

 

§ Found in Luke alone.

1 “But the characteristics of the two sisters are brought out in a very subtle way. In St. Luke the contrast is summed up, it were, in one definite incident; in St. John it is developed gradually in the course of a contiruous, narrative. In St. Luke the contrast is direct and trenchant, a contrast (one might almost say) of light and darkness. But in St. John the characters are shaded off, as it were, into one another” (Lft. Biblical Essays, p. 38).

Jos. Josephus.

AV. Authorized Version.

Beng. Bengel.

1Repetitio nominis indicium est delectationis, aut movendæ intentionis ut audirect intentius (Aug.). D doubles νεανίσκε in 7:4. It is not serving, but excess in it, that is rebuked; and this is not rebuked until Martha begins to find fault with her sister. See Wordsw. It is characteristic of Mary that she makes no reply, but leaves all to the Master.

א א Cod. Sinaiticus, sæc. iv. Brought by Tischendorf from the Convent of St. Catherine on Mt. Sinai; now at St. Petersburg. Contains the whole Gospel complete.

B B. Cod. Vaticanus, sæc. 4. In the Vatican Library certainly since 15331 (Batiffol, La Vaticane de Paul 3, etc., p. 86).

C C. Cod. Ephraemi Rescriptus, sæc. 5. In the National Library at Paris. Contains the following portions of the Gospel: 1:2–2:5, 2:42–3:21, 4:25–6:4, 6:37–7:16, or 17, 8:28–12:3, 19:42–20:27, 21:21–22:19, 23:25–24:7, 24:46–53.

These four MSS. are parts of what were once complete Bibles, and are designated by the same letter throughout the LXX and N.T.

D D. Cod. Bezae, sæc. vi. Given by Beza to the University Library at Cambridge 1581. Greek and Latin. Contains the whole Gospel.

L L. Cod. Regius Parisiensis, sæc. viii. National Library at Paris. Contains the whole Gospel.

A A. Cod. Alexandrinus, sæc. v. Once in the Patriarchal Library at Alexandria; sent by Cyril Lucar as a present to Charles 1. in 1628, and now in the British Museum. Complete.

R R. Cod. Nitriensis Rescriptus, sæc. 8. Brought from a convent in the Nitrian desert about 1847, and now in the British Museum. Contains 1:1–13, 1:69–2:4, 16–27, 4:38–5:5, 5:25–6:8, 18–36, 39, 6:49–7:22, 44, 46, 47, 8:5–15, 8:25–9:1, 12–43, 10:3–16, 11:5–27, 12:4–15, 40–52, 13:26–14:1, 14:12–15:1, 15:13–16:16, 17:21–18:10, 18:22–20:20, 20:33–47, 21:12–22:15, 42–56, 22:71–23:11, 38–51. By a second hand 15:19–21.

WH. Westcott and Hort.

D D. Cod. Bezae, sæc. vi. Given by Beza to the University Library at Cambridge 1581. Greek and Latin. Contains the whole Gospel.

A A. Cod. Alexandrinus, sæc. v. Once in the Patriarchal Library at Alexandria; sent by Cyril Lucar as a present to Charles 1. in 1628, and now in the British Museum. Complete.

C C. Cod. Ephraemi Rescriptus, sæc. 5. In the National Library at Paris. Contains the following portions of the Gospel: 1:2–2:5, 2:42–3:21, 4:25–6:4, 6:37–7:16, or 17, 8:28–12:3, 19:42–20:27, 21:21–22:19, 23:25–24:7, 24:46–53.

These four MSS. are parts of what were once complete Bibles, and are designated by the same letter throughout the LXX and N.T.

Δ Δ. Cod. Sangallensis, sæc. ix. In the monastery of St. Gall in Switzerland. Greek and Latin. Contains the whole Gospel.

א א Cod. Sinaiticus, sæc. iv. Brought by Tischendorf from the Convent of St. Catherine on Mt. Sinai; now at St. Petersburg. Contains the whole Gospel complete.

B B. Cod. Vaticanus, sæc. 4. In the Vatican Library certainly since 15331 (Batiffol, La Vaticane de Paul 3, etc., p. 86).

C C. Cod. Ephraemi Rescriptus, sæc. 5. In the National Library at Paris. Contains the following portions of the Gospel: 1:2–2:5, 2:42–3:21, 4:25–6:4, 6:37–7:16, or 17, 8:28–12:3, 19:42–20:27, 21:21–22:19, 23:25–24:7, 24:46–53.

These four MSS. are parts of what were once complete Bibles, and are designated by the same letter throughout the LXX and N.T.

L L. Cod. Regius Parisiensis, sæc. viii. National Library at Paris. Contains the whole Gospel.

Boh. Bohairic.

Aeth. Ethiopic.

Syr Syriac.

Sin. Sinaitic.

1 Comp. Lucian, “But what if a guest at the same table neglects all that great variety of dishes, and chooses from those that are nearest to him one that suffices for his need, and is content with that alone, without even looking at all the rest is not he the stronger and the better man?” (Cynic. 7).

א א Cod. Sinaiticus, sæc. iv. Brought by Tischendorf from the Convent of St. Catherine on Mt. Sinai; now at St. Petersburg. Contains the whole Gospel complete.

B B. Cod. Vaticanus, sæc. 4. In the Vatican Library certainly since 15331 (Batiffol, La Vaticane de Paul 3, etc., p. 86).

L L. Cod. Regius Parisiensis, sæc. viii. National Library at Paris. Contains the whole Gospel.

A A. Cod. Alexandrinus, sæc. v. Once in the Patriarchal Library at Alexandria; sent by Cyril Lucar as a present to Charles 1. in 1628, and now in the British Museum. Complete.

C C. Cod. Ephraemi Rescriptus, sæc. 5. In the National Library at Paris. Contains the following portions of the Gospel: 1:2–2:5, 2:42–3:21, 4:25–6:4, 6:37–7:16, or 17, 8:28–12:3, 19:42–20:27, 21:21–22:19, 23:25–24:7, 24:46–53.

These four MSS. are parts of what were once complete Bibles, and are designated by the same letter throughout the LXX and N.T.

D D. Cod. Bezae, sæc. vi. Given by Beza to the University Library at Cambridge 1581. Greek and Latin. Contains the whole Gospel.

WH. Westcott and Hort.

RV. Revised Version.

Beng. Bengel.

א א Cod. Sinaiticus, sæc. iv. Brought by Tischendorf from the Convent of St. Catherine on Mt. Sinai; now at St. Petersburg. Contains the whole Gospel complete.

B B. Cod. Vaticanus, sæc. 4. In the Vatican Library certainly since 15331 (Batiffol, La Vaticane de Paul 3, etc., p. 86).

D D. Cod. Bezae, sæc. vi. Given by Beza to the University Library at Cambridge 1581. Greek and Latin. Contains the whole Gospel.

L L. Cod. Regius Parisiensis, sæc. viii. National Library at Paris. Contains the whole Gospel.

A A. Cod. Alexandrinus, sæc. v. Once in the Patriarchal Library at Alexandria; sent by Cyril Lucar as a present to Charles 1. in 1628, and now in the British Museum. Complete.

C C. Cod. Ephraemi Rescriptus, sæc. 5. In the National Library at Paris. Contains the following portions of the Gospel: 1:2–2:5, 2:42–3:21, 4:25–6:4, 6:37–7:16, or 17, 8:28–12:3, 19:42–20:27, 21:21–22:19, 23:25–24:7, 24:46–53.

These four MSS. are parts of what were once complete Bibles, and are designated by the same letter throughout the LXX and N.T.

R R. Cod. Nitriensis Rescriptus, sæc. 8. Brought from a convent in the Nitrian desert about 1847, and now in the British Museum. Contains 1:1–13, 1:69–2:4, 16–27, 4:38–5:5, 5:25–6:8, 18–36, 39, 6:49–7:22, 44, 46, 47, 8:5–15, 8:25–9:1, 12–43, 10:3–16, 11:5–27, 12:4–15, 40–52, 13:26–14:1, 14:12–15:1, 15:13–16:16, 17:21–18:10, 18:22–20:20, 20:33–47, 21:12–22:15, 42–56, 22:71–23:11, 38–51. By a second hand 15:19–21.

Δ Δ. Cod. Sangallensis, sæc. ix. In the monastery of St. Gall in Switzerland. Greek and Latin. Contains the whole Gospel.

Vulg. Vulgate.

 Alfred Plummer, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel according to S. Luke, International Critical Commentary (London: T&T Clark International, 1896), 289–293.



#10 Mark Allison

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 11:45 AM

It's also linked to the SIL Exegetical Summary, which I'm really learning to love.


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#11 דָנִיאֶל

דָנִיאֶל

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 11:46 AM

So that's mildly confusing, the series is called the "International Critical Commentary" but the volumes are titled "A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on ..." but ok.

 

Anyone have any comments on this set in comparison to Hermeniea (or similar technical commentaries), aside from cost and that this set is not the full current set but the smaller "classic" set ?

Is the use of Latin widespread ? It doesn't look as though even if it were so that it would be critical to following the arguments but I'd be keen to know if it is.

 

Thx

D
 


Edited by דָנִיאֶל, 19 May 2018 - 05:37 PM.

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ἡ μόνη ἀγαθὴ γλῶσσα γλῶσσα νεκρὰ ἐστιν
lišanu ēdēnitu damqitu lišanu mītu

"Du stammst vom Herrn Adam und der Herrin Eva ab", sagte Aslan. "Und das ist zugleich Ehre genug, um das Häupt des ärmsten Bettlers zu erheben, und genug, um die Schultern des größten Kaisers auf Erden zu beugen. Sei zufrieden." Aslan, Die Chroniken von Narnia, Prinz Kaspian von Narnia. CS Lewis. Übersetzt von Wolfgang Holbein und Christian Rendel.

Accordance Syntax Search For Wallace's Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics : https://github.com/4...WallaceInSyntax

Accordance Configurations :

Mac : 2009 27" iMac
12GB RAM

Windows : MSI GE72 7RE Apache Pro laptop
Intel Core Duo Intel i7 Kabylake

Android : Samsung Note III 5.0, Samsung Tab S3 7.0 and Lenovo TAB4 8" 7.1

#12 Daniel Francis

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 05:11 PM

Might be mildly more conservative than Hermeniea (due to age), In the classic volumes there is a fair amount of Latin (I have seen some older sets that defiantly use much more). I use Her. fairly often and find it useful and usually not hard to follow. Price being no object I personally would consider Her. a better series even talking today’s new volumes. I have never recommended the ICC as a set because my lack of original language skills has meant I do not get as much out of it as I would if I was fluent. I have ICC only because it was part of a package. I do not mean to dissuade you from this bargain set, but only trying to give you my experience with the volumes coming at it as a lay person with a passion for Biblical studies who has little language skill outside of English. I sight read some original language and can often sound out a few Greek words. I hope others can give you more insight and my comments such as they are can give you a little insight. I also may have a small bias towards Her. due to the fact I was raised Lutheran, All in all the big three Critical sets ICC, AYBC, Her. I find Her. Over all the most useful. That said I do enjoy using Anchor and have benefited from ICC some.

-dan
  • דָנִיאֶל likes this

#13 דָנִיאֶל

דָנִיאֶל

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 05:46 PM

Thanx Dan - I'm not especially surprised that there is a some amount of Latin in ICC, again given its age. Probably wouldn't be an obstacle it sounds like. While it's a good intro. price it's only really a bargain if I use it. :) And that remains an open question right now. I'm distracted by Josephus at present which requires other reference materials - though I'm finding the Accordance Map helpful in following his descriptions of the insurrection against Rome.

 

Thanx again

D


Sola lingua bona est lingua mortua
ἡ μόνη ἀγαθὴ γλῶσσα γλῶσσα νεκρὰ ἐστιν
lišanu ēdēnitu damqitu lišanu mītu

"Du stammst vom Herrn Adam und der Herrin Eva ab", sagte Aslan. "Und das ist zugleich Ehre genug, um das Häupt des ärmsten Bettlers zu erheben, und genug, um die Schultern des größten Kaisers auf Erden zu beugen. Sei zufrieden." Aslan, Die Chroniken von Narnia, Prinz Kaspian von Narnia. CS Lewis. Übersetzt von Wolfgang Holbein und Christian Rendel.

Accordance Syntax Search For Wallace's Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics : https://github.com/4...WallaceInSyntax

Accordance Configurations :

Mac : 2009 27" iMac
12GB RAM

Windows : MSI GE72 7RE Apache Pro laptop
Intel Core Duo Intel i7 Kabylake

Android : Samsung Note III 5.0, Samsung Tab S3 7.0 and Lenovo TAB4 8" 7.1

#14 ukfraser

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 06:31 AM

. While it's a good intro. price it's only really a bargain if I use it. :)
D


So true. I’m also concentrating on working though all the excellent resources I have already got before I add too many. Frustrating as the Accordance team are doing such a brilliant job in bringing us these resources and offers as I wish to support them.
  • Alistair, Michael J. Bolesta, revtim and 2 others like this
Fraser Sims
Accordance 2x iOS 11x on iPad pro and iOS 9 on iPhone 4s, occasionally accordance 12x on Mountain Lion on a reliable '08 mbp.
Other life enhancing software I use includes: forScore with AirTurn page turner for leading all aspects of a service from my iPad including liturgy, sermon and the congregational singing; HymnQuest for developing my selection of appropriate music for the service; Sibelius for preparing the music scores; Lightroom for my photo library!

#15 revtim

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 01:15 PM

Fraser,

 

I feel the pain and frustration.


  • ukfraser likes this

In Christ,

Tim Hall

 

MacOS

MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, 2017) [space grey...coolest computer color in my mind]

1.2 GHz Intel Core m3

8 GB 1867 MHz LPDDR3

Intel HD Graphics 615 1536 MB

Running High Sierra 10.13.5 [waiting somewhat patiently for Mojave]

 

iOS

iPhone X on Verizon

64 GB

Running 11.4

 

iPad mini (Late 2012) wi-fi only

16 GB

Running 9.3.5

 

Windows (rarely used)

ASUS 15"

Windows 8x

 


#16 R. Mansfield

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 10:43 AM

Heads up! Introductory pricing on newly-released ICC volumes ends at midnight EDT tonight!


Rick Mansfield

Technology Evangelist

Accordance Bible Software

 

Gear for Running Accordance:

 

macOS

2014 Mac Mini - 2.6 Ghz dual core Intel Core i5, 8 GB RAM, 1 TB HDD, macOS High Sierra

2016 15" MacBook Pro - 2.9 Ghz quad core Intel Core i7, 16 GB RAM, 2 TB SSD, macOS Mojave

 

Windows

2018 10" Microsoft Surface Go - 1.6 Ghz Pentium Gold, 8 GB RAM, 128 GB SSD, Windows 10 Pro

+ Parallels install of Windows 10 Pro on the above MacBook Pro

 

iOS

2018 iPhone XS Max - 256 GB, T-Mobile, iOS 12.x

2016 iPad Pro (12.9”) - 256 GB, T-Mobile, iOS 12.x

 

Android 

2017 Amazon Fire HD 8 - 32 GB internal + 64 GB microSD, Fire OS 5.6 (=Android OS 5.x)

2017 Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 - 128 GB internal, Android OS 8.0

2017 Blu Grand M - 8 GB internal + 64 GB microSD, Android OS 6.0





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