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How Women Sound - Luke 24:10-11


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#1 jkgayle

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Posted 26 September 2018 - 05:41 AM

ἦσαν δὲ ἡ Μαγδαληνὴ Μαρία
καὶ Ἰωάνα
καὶ Μαρία ἡ Ἰακώβου·
καὶ αἱ λοιπαὶ σὺν αὐταῖς ἔλεγον πρὸς τοὺς ἀποστόλους ταῦτα.

καὶ ἐφάνησαν ἐνώπιον αὐτῶν ὡσεὶ λῆρος τὰ ῥήματα ταῦτα,
καὶ ἠπίστουν αὐταῖς.

They were the Miriam of 
Magdala 
and Jo'Ana
and the Miriam of Jacob
and those left with them; they talked to the Commissioned about these very things,
and it seemed as they faced them like trashy, trifling, trumpery talk about these very things,

and they were untrustworthy to them.

--

"
It is in large part according to the sounds people make that we judge them sane or insane, male or female, good, evil, trustworthy, depressive, marriageable, moribund, likely or unlikely to make war on us, little better than animals, inspired by God. These judgments happen fast and can be brutal. Aristotle tells us that the highpitched voice of the female is one evidence of her evil disposition, for creatures who are brave or just (like lions, bulls, roosters and the human male) have large deep voices." - Anne Carson



#2 Abram K-J

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Posted 26 September 2018 - 07:30 AM

Looking up λῆρος in the good, old Strong's Dictionary, we can even say (if I am using the word correctly) that they thought it was a twaddling tale.


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Abram K-J
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#3 jkgayle

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Posted 26 September 2018 - 12:08 PM

Abram,

Twaddling is such an onomatopoeia. It makes the effect that, in Greek, βαρβαρισμός has.

Of course that Christian rhetorician or sophist, Procopius of Gaza, would refer to them in a context that makes the one seem nearly synonymous with the other:

 

καί πού με φιλοσοφοῦντα λῆρον ἐδόκεις, 
ὅτι με μὴ κρότος εἶχε πολύς, 
ἐξ ἀσήμου φωνῆς, 
ὦ Ζεῦ,
καὶ βαρβάρου γλώττης ὤν·


http://khazarzar.ske...c/Epistulae.pdf
 

 

For the women in Luke, if their's was a twaddling tale to the men, then they might have been twaddle baskets to them too.

In English we have many such nasty phrases, synonymous, many onomatopoeia, some not:
 

We all know someone who never seems to stop talking. They’re a yammerer, a babbler, a chatterbox—but they’re also a blatherskite, a clatterfart, and a twattle-basket, as well as a “clucking magpie” and a “seller of gossip”…

 

1. BABLIAMINY

Babble has been used to mean “to talk excessively” since the mid-13th century at least; the word babliaminy, coined by the English playwright Thomas Middleton, was derived from it in 1608. You can also call an incessant babbler a babelard, a bablatrice, and …

 

2. BABBLE-MERCHANT

… an old English slang word, literally meaning “someone who sells nonsense noise.”

 

3. BLATHERSKITE

Blatherskite or bletherskate is a 17th century word, probably originating in Scotland, that combines the verb blether or blather, meaning “to talk incessant nonsense,” and skite or skate, meaning “a sudden quick movement.”

 

4. BLATTEROON

Derived from blaterare, a Latin word meaning “to chatter” or “babble,” blatteroon or blateroon first appeared in English in the mid-1600s.

 

5. BLOVIATOR

Popularized by President Warren G. Harding (who probably picked it up from local Ohio slang in the late 19th century), the word bloviate is now taken to mean “to speak verbosely or long-windedly”­—and someone who does precisely that is a bloviator

 

6. CLATTERAN

As a verb, you can use clatter to mean “to disclose secrets,” or “to chatter or gossip,” and clatteran—alongside clattern and the next word on this list—are all derivatives of that. 

 

7. CLATTERFART

According to one Tudor Latin-English dictionary from 1552, a clatterfart is someone who “will disclose any light secret.” In other words, a gossip or a blabbermouth. 

 

8. CLIPMALABOR

Clipmalabor is an old Scots word for a gossip or a chatterbox, or according to the Scottish National Dictionary, “a senseless silly talker.” It’s a corruption of an earlier Scots word slip-ma-labor, which referred to a lazy slacker or idler who would literally let their work (i.e. their labor) “slip.” Ultimately, its original meaning was probably something along the lines of “someone who gossips while they should be working.”

 

9. GASHELBIKE

Gashle is an old dialect word meaning “to twist something out of shape,” while bike or beik is an old Scots derogatory term for a person’s mouth. And if you’re twisting your mouth out of shape by incessantly talking, then you’re a gashelbike

 

10. JANGLER

Long before it came to mean a jingling, clinking noise, the word jangle was used to mean “to talk excessively or noisily,” or “to dispute angrily.” It’s probably derived from an old French word meaning “to jeer” or “grumble,” and so a jangler was probably originally a constant, vocal complainer as much as a chatterer.

 

11. JAWSMITH

Dating back to the 1880s at least, the word jawsmith began life as late 19th century American slang for a chatterbox, but ultimately it came also to be used to refer to a proficient or professional talker or orator, or a vociferous leader or demagogue.  

 

12. LANGUAGER

Derived, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, from an old French word, langagier, meaning “to talk abundantly.” 

 

13. PRATEPIE

Prate has meant “to chatter” since the 15th century, and probably originally referred to the clucking of hens and poultry. The “pie” of pratepie comes from magpie, a bird that, like many other members of the crow family including jackdaws, jays, and choughs, has long been seen as a proverbially very vocal, garrulous creature. 

 

14. TONGUE-PAD

The word tongue-pad first appeared in English in the late 1600s, and was defined in A Dictionary of the Canting Crew in 1699 as “a smooth, glib-tongued, insinuating fellow.” That meaning had changed by the time it was added to Webster’s Dictionary in 1913, which defined it as “a great talker; a chatterbox.” 

 

15. TWATTLE-BASKET

What we would now called tittle-tattle was once also known as twittle-twattle in 16th century English, and derived from that, a twattle-basket is someone full of useless, idle chatter.

http://mentalfloss.c...nd-chatterboxes


 


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