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#21 A.D. Riddle

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 04:18 PM

The map in the first screenshot has a few oddities: the Euphrates River is chopped off before it reaches the Persian Gulf; and the Nile River appears to begin at the modern border of Egypt.

 

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#22 David Lang

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Posted 26 February 2019 - 09:32 PM

That's a pretty sharp-eyed observation. The clipping of those rivers is in the files we received from the publisher, including a PDF of the print edition.


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#23 Diatheke76

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 06:07 AM

I’m happy with my first edition Jewish study Bible 👍😁👌
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#24 Daniel Francis

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 02:55 PM

Nothing wrong with the old, the new is revised and over all 40% larger...

 

 

 
Psalm 11: Though this psalm contains standard motifs of the Psalter, it is odd structurally. It invokes divine punishment (vv. 4–7), but God is referred to in the third person, not the second person that typifies other petitions. Perhaps the psalmist is speaking from the Temple to his friends, rejecting their advice that he flee from the persecution of the evildoers (see comments below).
 
1-3: Though taking refuge in God is frequently used metaphorically in the Psalms, it is literal in 61:5, “O that I might dwell in Your tent forever, take refuge under Your protecting wings,” and perhaps here. The psalmist is thus seeking refuge at the Temple (see 1 Kings 1:50 n.) and rejecting his friends’ advice.
 
4-5: Many medieval and modern commentators understand Holy palace and heaven as synonymous. More likely, the point of the psalmist is that (paradoxically) God is located both in the Jerusalem Temple (His holy palace), where He can offer protection, and in heaven, from where His eyes behold and seek out and punish evildoers.
 
6: These are supernatural punishments, like that of Sodom (Gen. 19:24).
 
7: The LORD is righteous in the sense of being fair in retribution: this is emphasized through the word–repetition For the LORD is righteous; He loves righteous deeds. Behold His face: This may refer to being in God’s presence or to seeing a manifestation of God at the Temple, yet another hint that this psalmist is praying at the Temple, and wants to remain there. Other biblical texts suggest that the worshipper could behold the face of God at a temple (see Exod. 33:11; but contrast 33:17–23).
 
Adele Berlin, Marc Zvi Brettler, and Michael A. Fishbane, eds. The Jewish Study Bible. Accordance electronic ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004), paragraph 7961.
 
 
 
Ps. 11: Though this psalm contains standard motifs of the Psalter, it is oddly structured and several of its phrases are difficult to grasp. It invokes divine punishment (vv. 4–7), but God is referred to in the third person, not the second person that typifies other petitions. Perhaps the psalmist is speaking from the Temple to his friends, rejecting their advice that he flee from the persecution of the evildoers (see comments below).
 
1–3: Though taking refuge in God is frequently used metaphorically in the Psalms, it is best construed as literal here, as in 61.5, “O that I might dwell in Your tent forever, / take refuge under Your protecting wings.” The psalmist is thus seeking refuge at the Temple (see 1 Kings 1.50 n.) and rejecting his friends’ advice to flee.
 
4–5: Many medieval and modern commentators understand holy palace and heaven as synonymous, referring to God’s heavenly temple. More likely, the point of the psalmist is that (paradoxically) God is located both in the Jerusalem Temple (His holy palace), where He can offer protection, and in heaven, from where His eyes behold and seek out and punish evildoers.
 
6: These are extreme supernatural punishments, like that of Sodom (Gen. 19.24).
 
7: The LORD is righteous in the sense of being fair in retribution: this is emphasized through the word-repetition For the LORD is righteous; / He loves righteous deeds. Behold His face: This may refer to being in God’s Presence or to seeing a manifestation of God at the Temple, yet another hint that this psalmist is praying at the Temple, and wants to remain there. Other biblical texts suggest that the worshipper could behold the face of God at a temple (see Exod. 23.17 n.).
 
Adele Berlin and Marc Zvi Brettler, eds. The Jewish Study Bible: Second Edition. Accordance electronic ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014), 1279.
 
This example of Psalm 11 shows only a very minimal changes.
 
However this section below from Isaiah 6 shows significant expansion and editing:
 
 
 
6:1–13: Prophetic commissioning. Many read this passage as a description of Isaiah’s initiation into prophecy and hence view it as the earliest text of Isaiah’s career. They note similarities between this text and others describing the inauguration of prophets (Exod. chs 3-4; Exod. ch 6; Jer. ch 1; Ezek. chs 1-3). According to others, it depicts the beginning of a new stage in Isaiah’s career; he receives a new assignment that differs from earlier ones. These scholars point out that the ch does not appear at the beginning of the book. Further, the first five chs call on the Judeans to repent, but from this ch until the last prophecy of Isaiah son of Amoz, the prophet does not call on the Israelites to repent; 6:9–10 may account for this difference.
 
1-4: The vision of the divine court. Isaiah sees God and the deity’s retinue (see also 1 Kings 22:19–23; Job chs 1–2). This is one of many passages indicating that some biblical authors conceive of God as a physical being whom a few people can see (cf. Exod. 24:11; 33:11; Num. 12:8). On the divine court, cf. 2 Kings 22:19–23; Job chs 1–2.
 
3: Along with a v. from Ezekiel’s inaugural vision (3:12), this v. serves as the centerpiece of the “kedushah” prayer, in which worshippers praise God using angelic liturgy. The “kedushah” appears in the communal recitation of the “ʿamidah” (the main statutory prayer in Judaism), which requires a prayer quorum (“minyan”) of ten. It is also found in services for all mornings, Sabbath afternoons, and Saturday nights in sections that can be recited in private.
 
5-7: Isaiah’s reaction and purification. Isaiah fears that he will die, because he is not worthy to see God. A seraph or angelic being purifies him and reassures him that he is safe.
 
8-13: The commissioning: repentance is no longer an option. Isaiah is told of his mission.
 
8-10: Shockingly, the prophet is not supposed to help the people understand the danger to which their sinfulness exposes them. Cf. 29:9–12. God no longer desires repentance; rather, God wants to vent divine anger on the nation. Some rabbinic commentators, unable to imagine such an interpretation, argue that the imperative verbs must be taken as future–tense verbs. Hence God does not order Isaiah to cause the people to misunderstand; rather, God predicts that they will not achieve understanding in spite of Isaiah’s speeches, because the people do not want to acknowledge the truth.
 
11-12: The divine judgment will involve the exile of most of the nation.
 
13: According to the NJPS translation (which reads against the cantillation, the signs in the Masoretic biblical text which serve as punctuation marks as well as musical notations), a small remnant will repent after the disaster; from this kernel the nation will be renewed. The renewal involves not exiles who return from afar but survivors who remain in the land. Thus Isaiah’s notion of renewal differs from the vision of renewal in Ezekiel, Jeremiah, and Second Isaiah. Alternatively (and in accordance with the cantillation), the first half of the v. can be translated much more negatively: “And when a tenth are left, they will again be burned.” In this rendering, the few survivors are subject to additional disaster. The second half is also obscure, but it seems to refer to the fact that renewed life can come out of the stump of terebinth and oak trees. Here the notion of the remnant that is saved from a devastating calamity does appear, however subtly.
 
Adele Berlin, Marc Zvi Brettler, and Michael A. Fishbane, eds. The Jewish Study Bible. Accordance electronic ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004), paragraph 5487.
 
 
 
6.1–13: Prophetic commissioning. Many read this passage as a description of Isaiah’s initiation into prophecy and hence view it as the earliest text of Isaiah’s career. They note similarities between this text and others describing the inauguration of prophets (Exod. chs 3–4; Exod. ch 6; Jer. ch 1; Ezek. chs 1–3). Others, pointing out that the ch does not appear at the beginning of the book, suggest that it depicts the beginning of a new stage in Isaiah’s career; he receives a new assignment that differs from earlier ones. Supporting this notion is that the first five chs call on the Judeans to repent, but from this ch until the last prophecy of Isaiah son of Amoz, the prophet does not call on the Israelites to repent; 6.9–10 may account for this difference.
 
1–4: The vision of the divine court. Isaiah sees God and the deity’s retinue. This is one of many passages indicating that some biblical authors conceive of God as a physical being whom a few people can see (cf. Exod. 24.11; 33.11; Num. 12.8). On the divine court, cf. 1 Kings 22.19–23; Job chs 1–2.
 
2: Seraphs, a heavenly being (specifically, a flying asp). Representations of seraphs who surround the heavenly throne appear in Judean art of the 8th c., including a seal presenting a picture almost identical to Isaiah’s vision (first published by archaeologists in 1941). The seal belonged to a contemporary of Isaiah’s named Ashna, who was a courtier of King Ahaz. Given the relatively small size of Jerusalem in the 8th c. and Isaiah’s close connections with the royal court (evident in ch 7 and in chs 36–39), it is highly probable that Isaiah and Ashna knew each other.
 
3: Heavenly praise. Along with a v. from Ezekiel’s inaugural vision (3.12) and Ps. 146.10, this v. serves as the centerpiece of the Kedushah prayer, in which worshippers praise God using angelic liturgy. The Kedushah appears in the communal recitation of the “ʿamidah” (the main statutory prayer in Judaism), which requires a prayer quorum (“minyan”) of ten. It is also found in services for all mornings, Sabbath afternoons, and Saturday nights in sections that can be recited in private. These vv. share several features with other biblical and ancient Jewish texts that describe angelic worship (these texts include Pss. 29; 89.6–8; 96.4; 97.7; 103.20–22; and 148.1–3; as well as several texts from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha (Ben Sirach 42.17–24 and 1 Enoch 47.2 and 61.10–11), and early Jewish mystical texts known as heikhalot rabbati literature. The common elements among these texts include God’s kingship, glory (“kabod”), and holiness (expressed with the adjective “kadosh”); the three-fold (in some other cases, seven-fold) repetition of key vocabulary; the motif of the heavenly beings singing together or singing antiphonally (here, the seraphim call back and forth to each other).
 
5–7: Isaiah’s reaction and purification. Isaiah fears that he will die, because he is not worthy to see God. The belief was widespread in ancient Israel that a human who saw God would die (see, e.g., Exod. 33.20). Isaiah is informed that he is an exception to this general rule when a seraph or angelic being purifies him and reassures him that he is safe.
 
8–13: The commissioning: repentance is no longer an option. Isaiah is told of his (new) mission.
 
8–10: Shockingly, the prophet is not supposed to help the people understand the danger to which their sinfulness exposes them. Cf. 29.9–12. God no longer desires repentance; rather, God wants to vent divine anger on the nation. Some rabbinic commentators, unable to imagine such an interpretation, argue that the imperative verbs must be taken as future-tense verbs. Hence God does not order Isaiah to cause the people to misunderstand; rather, God predicts that they will not achieve understanding in spite of Isaiah’s speeches, because the people do not want to acknowledge the truth.
 
11–12: The divine judgment will involve the exile of most of the nation.
 
13: According to the NJPS translation (which reads against the cantillation tradition marked by the signs in the Masoretic biblical text which serve as punctuation marks as well as musical notations), a small remnant will repent after the disaster; from this kernel the nation will be renewed. The renewal involves not exiles who return from afar but survivors who remain in the land. Thus Isaiah’s notion of renewal differs from the vision of renewal in Ezek., Jer., and Second Isaiah, which involve exile and return from exile. Alternatively (and in accordance with the cantillation), the first half of the v. can be translated much more negatively: “And when a tenth are left, they will again be burned.” In this rendering, the few survivors are subject to additional disaster. The second half is also obscure, but it seems to refer to the fact that renewed life can come out of the stump of terebinth and oak trees. Here the notion of the remnant that is saved from a devastating calamity does appear, however subtly.
 
Adele Berlin and Marc Zvi Brettler, eds. The Jewish Study Bible: Second Edition. Accordance electronic ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014), 778-780.
 
-Dan
PS: Diatheke76, I do realize that you having the original JSB did not need the old samples but in fairness to those who might not own it I thought it wise to include them.

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#25 ukfraser

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 05:02 PM

According to the preface in the second version of the jps:

"The first edition ... Many readers found the essays to be an extremely valuable resource for learning about the world of the Bible, the history of Jewish Bible study, and the methods of modern scholarship. We received so many positive reactions to the essay section that we thought it would be useful to augment it substantially, offering even more background on a wider variety of topics.

But the essays are not the only new feature of this edition. Biblical scholarship is dynamic and ever-changing. We have therefore encouraged all the original contributors of both annotations and essays to revise their work; and in some cases, we sought new annotators to reflect more recent scholarship and to include more women and Israeli scholars. Thus, this volume is over one-third new."
ADELE BERLIN
MARC ZVI BRETTLER
February 2014
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#26 R. Mansfield

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:20 PM

FYI--

 

NOAB has been updated to v. 1.3 in Accordance and now includes 28 27 full-color maps.


Edited by R. Mansfield, 28 February 2019 - 02:50 PM.
Changed count

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#27 Paul Meiklejohn

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:32 PM

Three updates in three days... that's got to be a record?!


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#28 R. Mansfield

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:34 PM

Three updates in three days... that's got to be a record?!

 

Probably. We apologize for that, but we always want to make certain everything is there!


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#29 Mark Allison

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:37 PM

The advantage of digital over print resources is that digital resources will always be better than the day you purchased them :-)


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#30 Paul Meiklejohn

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:39 PM

Richard, it wasn't a complaint, it was a compliment  :).  The fact that you been working on these updates so soon after release, when there are so many other demands, is to the credit of everyone.


Edited by Paul Meiklejohn, 28 February 2019 - 02:40 PM.

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#31 R. Mansfield

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:40 PM

Well, we’d always prefer to get it right the first time; but as Mark indicated above, there are advantages to digital. 


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#32 Daniel Francis

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:46 PM

NOAB has been updated to v. 1.3 in Accordance and now includes 28 full-color maps.

 

I am only counting 27 unless that last one counts as two maps... (or i really cannot count but i did count them 4 times, but that is no guarantee i counted properly).

 

-dan


Edited by Daniel Francis, 28 February 2019 - 02:47 PM.


#33 R. Mansfield

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:49 PM

I believe you are right--27. I said “28” based on internal discussion. 


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#34 Mark Allison

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:50 PM

I am only counting 27 unless that last one counts as two maps... (or i really cannot count but i did count them 4 times, but that is no guarantee i counted properly).

 

-dan

 

 

Wow. Nothing slips by Daniel :-)


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#35 Daniel Francis

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:57 PM

lol while could technically be called 28 since there is the inset on map 27..... just was wondering if i was missing something..... all in all very very happy to have NOAB in Accordance great job!!!!!


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#36 R. Mansfield

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 02:45 PM

Good news! Introductory pricing for the new study Bible releases from OUP has been extended another week!


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#37 R. Mansfield

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 11:54 AM

Heads up! Introductory pricing for the three new OUP study Bibles ends at midnight EDT tonight!


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