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what is ibo?

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#1 Philip

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 06:23 AM

I'm sure this has been covered somewhere, but neither I nor my colleagues can find an answer. Instant details for εἴσειμι_2, reads as follows: "(εἰς, εἶμι_2) Verb 3 sing imperf act indic to enter, come before; recognize (ibo)." Can someone tell me what ibo means?

 

 
 

 



#2 JonathanHuber

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 06:58 AM

Hmm, I have no idea either. LSJ writes ibo after eimi in every entry derived from eimi, but it doesn't define what that means. It's not in the list of general abbreviations. 


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#3 Mark Allison

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 07:04 AM

The two Greek verbs are sometimes referred to by noting their Latin equivalents— εἰμί sum (I am) and εἰμι ibo (I shall go).

 

I had to look it up. It's funny that LSJ just assumes everyone should know this :-)


Edited by Mark Allison, 17 March 2020 - 07:09 AM.

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#4 Brian K. Mitchell

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 07:45 AM

The two Greek verbs are sometimes referred to by noting their Latin equivalents— εἰμί sum (I am) and εἰμι ibo (I shall go).

 

I had to look it up. It's funny that LSJ just assumes everyone should know this :-)

Although, I wasn't the one to ask the question I appreciate your answer! I

I guess some of the older dictionaries assumed people knew Latin because in the past Latin used to be compulsory in public schools in the western world (or at least some schools), and it seems people usually took Latin before taking attic greek.

 


 

 


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חַפְּשׂוּ בַּתּוֹרָה הֵיטֵב וְאַל תִּסְתַּמְּכוּ עַל דְּבָרַי

 

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#5 Philip

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 09:43 PM

Ibo is the future of eo--I go. I guess our source is trying to indicate the separate uses of εἰμι  as sum (I am) and ibo (I shall go). Of course in the GNT εἰμι tends toward the first, at least when it appears without a prefix. I'm not sure precisely how ibo is relevant to GNT: εἴσειμι appears 4 times, all of them meaning something close to enter, without tense being much of an issue. In other words, the 'go' part works, but the choice of the future in Latin doesn't seem to apply.


Edited by Philip, 17 March 2020 - 09:51 PM.


#6 Boris Repschinski

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Posted 18 March 2020 - 03:22 AM

It's funny that LSJ just assumes everyone should know this :-)

The LSJ was conceived at a time when anyone who would need a Greek dictionary was very familiar with Latin. 


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#7 Mark Allison

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Posted 18 March 2020 - 06:17 AM

The LSJ was conceived at a time when anyone who would need a Greek dictionary was very familiar with Latin. 

 

Yeah, I kind of meant funny/sad, if that's a thing. Sort of bittersweet. Like being happy we don't have to use slide rules any more, but sad that we don't have some of the basic math skills that were required to use one.


Edited by Mark Allison, 18 March 2020 - 06:18 AM.

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#8 Solly

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Posted 18 March 2020 - 08:23 AM

Yeah, I kind of meant funny/sad, if that's a thing. Sort of bittersweet. Like being happy we don't have to use slide rules any more, but sad that we don't have some of the basic math skills that were required to use one.

 

Ha, in pre-personal calculator days, when my classes hit the computational part of the courses I taught, we spent at least a full week in slide rule instruction and ways to mentally calculate magnitude so that one knew where to place the decimal point. That skill of approximation and magnitude predicting often saved me when fat fingering an entry with a calculator. It is a habit that all folk should learn as an error checking method.

 

Now don't even get me started with calculations done with the aid of Log tables. ;)

 

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#9 JohnABarnett

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Posted 18 March 2020 - 10:39 AM

 

Now don't even get me started with calculations done with the aid of Log tables. ;)

 

—Joseph

 

Sounds like even Greek is easier.

 

My Dad worked as an electrical engineer in the US space program from Mercury through the space shuttles. He was always using a slide rule.


Edited by JohnABarnett, 18 March 2020 - 10:40 AM.

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#10 Boris Repschinski

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Posted 19 March 2020 - 03:14 AM

That skill of approximation and magnitude predicting often saved me when fat fingering an entry with a calculator.

 

There is an easy solution: Get a bigger smartphone.


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#11 MattChristian

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Posted 19 March 2020 - 04:10 PM

Yeah, I kind of meant funny/sad, if that's a thing. Sort of bittersweet. Like being happy we don't have to use slide rules any more, but sad that we don't have some of the basic math skills that were required to use one.

I would say it is a shame- BDB has Arabic cognates for almost everything because at its conception, every Semitist worked with Arabic. The comparative data in any dictionary is critical and helpful if you are doing any philology and trying to compare to other related languages. This is a prime example of comparative data that is useful for those working in Greek language, something comparative. I would argue that it would be awesome if Greek dictionary entries had recourse to Syriac as the Eastern Churches' parallels to the GNT are very fruitful, especially since a lot of the Gospel material mirrors Semitic language in some fashion (a somewhat debated and controversial topi I know- coming from the field of OT studies I see Semitic influence very heavy in the NT and I don't mind being dismissed or told I am wrong by NT scholars- fine by me and I mean no offense, just an observation and my personal opinion).


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Cheers,

 

Matt C





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