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Hebrew parsing and word chart


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#1 Rusty

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 09:47 AM

Does anyone know how to make the parsing and or word chart tool stop breaking apart hebrew words? I would like to study the actual words in a text, so it would be helpful to have an entire verb all in one box. As is it now the prefix is in one box, then the verb, and then the suffix. I am trying to get ready for an exam where at least 45 verses will be fair game and I need to spend my time studying, not piecing the text back together. Thank you for any help.

Rusty

#2 RobM

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 10:42 AM

Does anyone know how to make the parsing and or word chart tool stop breaking apart hebrew words? I would like to study the actual words in a text, so it would be helpful to have an entire verb all in one box. As is it now the prefix is in one box, then the verb, and then the suffix. I am trying to get ready for an exam where at least 45 verses will be fair game and I need to spend my time studying, not piecing the text back together. Thank you for any help.

Rusty


I've tried to think of a way around this other than manually manipulating every word... I couldn't think of one. But as for studying for a hebrew test, especially one that covers so much material, you may just want to practice reading through the text over and over again, pausing at verbs and any elements you're uncertain of and using ID and maybe other lexical/grammatical tools you may have (HALOT, Waltke, etc.).

Another thing to think about, however, is that having to 'piece the text back together' could actually be a really good study method. Perhaps you don't actually manipulate the text in the Word Chart window, but you can do so by thinking about the morphological relationship of the prefixes and suffixes to the given verbs or construct relationships. And you could have the word chart window open next to the BHS text to be able to look back and forth at the word in context to the word parsed/separated out in the word chart.

What do you think?

#3 David Lang

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 10:42 AM

Rusty,

There's no way to keep the prefixes and suffixes combined in the Parsing window, but perhaps we could suggest another approach if we had a clear idea how you're trying to study for this exam. Are you going to be asked to parse these word "combinations," to translate them, or what? The BHS-W4 database only morphologically separates distinct words which technically should be parsed separately. It does not, for example, separate the endings of a verb's various inflections.

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#4 Rusty

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 10:58 AM

Rusty,

There's no way to keep the prefixes and suffixes combined in the Parsing window, but perhaps we could suggest another approach if we had a clear idea how you're trying to study for this exam. Are you going to be asked to parse these word "combinations," to translate them, or what? The BHS-W4 database only morphologically separates distinct words which technically should be parsed separately. It does not, for example, separate the endings of a verb's various inflections.



#5 Rusty

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:03 AM

I've tried to think of a way around this other than manually manipulating every word... I couldn't think of one. But as for studying for a hebrew test, especially one that covers so much material, you may just want to practice reading through the text over and over again, pausing at verbs and any elements you're uncertain of and using ID and maybe other lexical/grammatical tools you may have (HALOT, Waltke, etc.).

Another thing to think about, however, is that having to 'piece the text back together' could actually be a really good study method. Perhaps you don't actually manipulate the text in the Word Chart window, but you can do so by thinking about the morphological relationship of the prefixes and suffixes to the given verbs or construct relationships. And you could have the word chart window open next to the BHS text to be able to look back and forth at the word in context to the word parsed/separated out in the word chart.

What do you think?


Rob,
Thanks for the reply. That may be a good study method. With so much on the table I am taking a very practical approach to the examine. If I can use an excel of numbers spread sheet to show me the patterns or exceptions in the text, then I can focus on the specifics that could trip me up. At some point with a test over such a large amount of material you have to focus on certain aspects.

Thanks again,
Rusty

#6 Rusty

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:14 AM

Rusty,

There's no way to keep the prefixes and suffixes combined in the Parsing window, but perhaps we could suggest another approach if we had a clear idea how you're trying to study for this exam. Are you going to be asked to parse these word "combinations," to translate them, or what? The BHS-W4 database only morphologically separates distinct words which technically should be parsed separately. It does not, for example, separate the endings of a verb's various inflections.


David,

Thanks for the help. I will be given 4 or 5 verses out of the possible 45. I will need to translate the 4 or 5 verses and parse completely all verbal forms. In these 45 verses there are 186 verbs. So I am trying to create an spreadsheet that I can sort through to help me see what I need to study. Out of those 186 verbs how many are repeats? How many are qal, or niphal, or hiphil? Is there a chain of infinitive constructs or a random infinitive absolute? These are some of my questions that I think I could see if the words were kept together and I could start to see patterns in the text and limit the amount of memorization. Maybe every niphal in these verses is used in the yiqtol 3rd masc. sing., these types of patterns would make this much easier. I hope I have explained what I want to do, I don't know if it is possible. I have a couple of weeks before the examine so I have a little bit of time to master a lot of verses and I am trying to spend my time well.

Thanks for all your help and effort,
Rusty

#7 David Lang

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:42 AM

Rusty,

If you're wanting to find patterns, I would start by using some of Accordance's statistical tools. First, set up a range for the 45 verses you'll be examined on, then do a Word search of that range for [VERB]. That will find the 186 verbs you mentioned. Now go to the Details pop-up and choose Analysis. That will list every verb that was found and the number of occurrences. Examine that list to see which verbs you're most likely to run across.

Now, of those most common verbs, what forms are you most likely to run across? You can find that out by using command-T to set the Analysis Display, then drag the Tag item into the first column underneath the LEX item. That will give you the most common parsings. Drag the INFLECT item in and you'll have a list of the most common inflections.

You could also play with the Analysis graph to see the distribution of various forms across the search range. You may find, for example, that a particular verb appears ten times in those 45 verses, but all of the occurrences are in one small cluster of 5 verses. In that case, you might learn that verb cold but if you aren't given those five verses it won't do you any good. Your time might be better spent learning a verb that appears 8 times and is spread more evenly throughout the 45 verses.

I hope this helps. If you play with these tools and have specific questions I can help you with let me know. (Also, let me know WHICH 45 verses you're talking about so I can stop talking in hypothetics.)

Sincerely,
David Lang
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#8 Rusty

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 12:46 PM

Rusty,

If you're wanting to find patterns, I would start by using some of Accordance's statistical tools. First, set up a range for the 45 verses you'll be examined on, then do a Word search of that range for [VERB]. That will find the 186 verbs you mentioned. Now go to the Details pop-up and choose Analysis. That will list every verb that was found and the number of occurrences. Examine that list to see which verbs you're most likely to run across.

Now, of those most common verbs, what forms are you most likely to run across? You can find that out by using command-T to set the Analysis Display, then drag the Tag item into the first column underneath the LEX item. That will give you the most common parsings. Drag the INFLECT item in and you'll have a list of the most common inflections.

You could also play with the Analysis graph to see the distribution of various forms across the search range. You may find, for example, that a particular verb appears ten times in those 45 verses, but all of the occurrences are in one small cluster of 5 verses. In that case, you might learn that verb cold but if you aren't given those five verses it won't do you any good. Your time might be better spent learning a verb that appears 8 times and is spread more evenly throughout the 45 verses.

I hope this helps. If you play with these tools and have specific questions I can help you with let me know. (Also, let me know WHICH 45 verses you're talking about so I can stop talking in hypothetics.)


David,

Those are very good suggestions that I will certainly try. This is a aramaic class and the verses will be from 2:4 to 2:49 in Daniel.
I will try your suggestions and get back to you.
Thanks,
Rusty




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