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Concise Dictionary of Classical Hebrew

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Category: Hebrew Lexicons

$59.90
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This Dictionary (CDCH) is an abridgment of the 8-volume Dictionary of Classical Hebrew (DCH), the first volume of which appeared in 1993. The DCH was the first dictionary of the Classical Hebrew language ever to be published. Unlike other dictionaries of the ancient Hebrew language, which cover only the texts of the Hebrew Bible, either exclusively or principally, DCH records the language of all texts written in Hebrew from the earliest times down to the end of the second century CE. That is to say, it includes not only the words used in the Hebrew Bible, but also those found in the Hebrew Book of Ben Sira (Ecclesiasticus), the Dead Sea Scrolls, and all the ancient Hebrew inscriptions.

The CDCH thus contains not only the c. 8400 Hebrew words found in the standard dictionaries, but also a further 3340+ words (540 from the Dead Sea Scrolls, 680 from other ancient Hebrew literature, and 2120+ proposed words for the Hebrew Bible not previously recognized by dictionaries). All the words in the full Dictionary of Classical Hebrew are to be found in the CDCH.

The CDCH has been designed to be clear, concise and easy to use. The Hebrew words are arranged in alphabetical order, so it is not necessary to know the ‘root’ of a word to look it up in the Dictionary. All the Hebrew words and phrases quoted are accompanied by an English translation. At the end of each entry on verbs is a list of the nouns derived from that verb; and at the end of each entry on nouns a reference to the verb from which it is derived (when known). For every word the numbers of its occurrences in the four main corpora of classical Hebrew (the Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Ben Sira, and the ancient inscriptions) are noted. All the proper names in classical Hebrew texts are included, with their correct spellings in English.

Previous dictionaries have generally been revisions and adaptations of earlier dictionaries; DCH and CDCH result from a completely fresh re-examination of the texts and an independent analysis of the meanings of Hebrew words. Rich in examples and citations, this edition will be of immense value to students at all levels, as well as to working scholars who will not always be in a position to refer to the complete DCH.

The Accordance version includes hyperlinks to all the original texts, and internal links to related words.

The Concise Dictionary of Classical Hebrew
• Editor: David J. A. Clines
Publisher: Sheffield Phoenix Press (2009)

Concise Dictionary of Classical Hebrew is included with the following packages:

category
code
title
price
Collection11-Advanced
$999.00
Collection11-Essential
$499.00
Collection11-OrigLang
$299.00
Collection11-Ultimate
$1,999.00

Reviews

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September 23, 2013  |  3:51 AM  |  Okay (3)
The dictionary itself warrants 4 stars, as dictionaries go. Like most of them, for the sake of ease of use it does not locate words within native (Israelite) semantic or cognitive domains -- which I view as a sad compromise. [With all due respect to lexicographers, whose work is extremely difficult and exacting, I don't know of any dictionary that I could award 5 stars to.] All things considered, the Concise DCH was still the one dictionary that I required my seminary students to purchase. Meanwhile, however, this digital edition presently suffers from an unusually high rate of production-related errors, which costs it another star in my rating.

OVERALL DESCRIPTION. The Concise DCH is a greatly abridged version of the recently completed 8-volume Dictionary of Classical Hebrew, which by the way was created using Accordance. This edition seems meant for quick reference and as a handy guide for word studies of one's own. It includes words used either in the Hebrew Bible, Ben Sira ...
The dictionary itself warrants 4 stars, as dictionaries go. Like most of them, for the sake of ease of use it does not locate words within native (Israelite) semantic or cognitive domains -- which I view as a sad compromise. [With all due respect to lexicographers, whose work is extremely difficult and exacting, I don't know of any dictionary that I could award 5 stars to.] All things considered, the Concise DCH was still the one dictionary that I required my seminary students to purchase. Meanwhile, however, this digital edition presently suffers from an unusually high rate of production-related errors, which costs it another star in my rating.

OVERALL DESCRIPTION. The Concise DCH is a greatly abridged version of the recently completed 8-volume Dictionary of Classical Hebrew, which by the way was created using Accordance. This edition seems meant for quick reference and as a handy guide for word studies of one's own. It includes words used either in the Hebrew Bible, Ben Sira (Ecclesiasticus), the Dead Sea Scrolls, or ancient Hebrew inscriptions.

Like most biblical dictionaries, each entry starts with an English gloss and then cites the most telling instances of the word in its extended or alternate meanings. In so doing, it quotes the relevant Hebrew phrase in which the word appears, allowing users a rough idea of how the word is used in various contexts. Unlike most dictionaries, its analyses of word meaning are original; for better or worse, it does not merely reproduce any (Jewish or Christian) chain of lexicological tradition.

(There's much more! Perhaps OakTree ought to post online the dictionary's Introduction, so that prospective buyers can read what the editor has to say about what makes this work distinctive.)

ERRORS. Unfortunately, this digital edition was created from the print edition via a method that (for the time being) impairs the dictionary's usefulness to scholars of biblical Hebrew. Specifically: in the abovementioned quotations of Hebrew phrases, the words often appear out of order. (In the entry for one common noun that I spot-checked, 9 out of 31 quotations were garbled.) Such garbling of the biblical text means that those quotations do not fulfill their promise of providing users with a quick overview of how the word was used.

OakTree promises to fix those relatively widespread errors eventually. Meanwhile, users of this module can "mouse-over" each verse citation, which will display that entire verse in Hebrew (if your Instant Details preferences are set to do so).
November 15, 2011  |  8:02 AM  |  Fantastic (5)
DCH is a concise lexicon based on an incomplete set (only six volumes have been published) by Clines, The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew. Clines approaches his definitions in a way quite different from HALOT in that there is no comparative philology. Clines believes that the meanings of words are determined by their use in a given context (in the tradition of James Barr). Some see this as a disadvantage. (Notably, Richardson, in a critical review in JSS.) The great advantage though of DCH over HALOT, is that it is careful in every instance to set words in their syntactical relations, making it easy to locate a word, and to understand how it functions in a sentence. Students who want to know more than just a word's meaning will greatly benefit from this. In this respect, DCH is ahead of its competitors. Also, the glosses given under each entry make it a treasure trove for students, who wish to learn basic definitions. There are no such glosses in HALOT, where the ordering of words ...
DCH is a concise lexicon based on an incomplete set (only six volumes have been published) by Clines, The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew. Clines approaches his definitions in a way quite different from HALOT in that there is no comparative philology. Clines believes that the meanings of words are determined by their use in a given context (in the tradition of James Barr). Some see this as a disadvantage. (Notably, Richardson, in a critical review in JSS.) The great advantage though of DCH over HALOT, is that it is careful in every instance to set words in their syntactical relations, making it easy to locate a word, and to understand how it functions in a sentence. Students who want to know more than just a word's meaning will greatly benefit from this. In this respect, DCH is ahead of its competitors. Also, the glosses given under each entry make it a treasure trove for students, who wish to learn basic definitions. There are no such glosses in HALOT, where the ordering of words also, is not in terms of frequency of use, but in terms of concreteness. In addition one finds statistical analysis of words in DCH, which is not the case consistently in HALOT. Another advantage of Clines over HALOT is that every word and phrase in DCH is translated into English. Finally, one should say that the definitions offered in DCH, have a natural English flow, always makes sense, and stand in the great tradition of English Bibles and that of BDB (the definitions in BDB and Clines often correspond). If one wants definitions that stand wholly outside this tradition, one ought to turn rather to HALOT. In an ideal world, one would like to own both HALOT and DCH. But if one cannot afford both, the choice, as far as this reviewer is concerned, is clear.