Product Details

HCSB with Strong's upgrade from HCSB

Category: Upgrades

$20.00   |   Full Version: HCSBS ($39.99)

Details


This upgrade is offered to users who previously purchased the Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB).  Purchase of this upgrade will supply the user with the HCSB with Strong’s numbering (HCSBS). Add this upgrade product to your shopping cart like any other product.

The Holman CSB was commissioned by Broadman & Holman Publishers (B&H) and is the first all-new Bible translation from a major publisher in over 25 years. An international team of 100 scholars and English stylists representing more than 20 different Protestant denominations worked together from the original biblical languages of Greek, Hebrew and Aramaic to arrive at the most accurate and readable modern English translation available today. See article.

This upgrade includes Strong’s numbers throughout the text which offers users the ability to amplify to Hebrew and Greek dictionaries and perform searches based on Strong’s numbers.

Included Modules


The following modules and groups are included when you purchase this package. For details click the Title.

category
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title
HCSBS

Reviews

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March 5, 2013  |  1:58 PM  |  Fantastic (5)
At first I ignored this new version of the Bible, but began to take notice after I acquired an electronic form of the text. I began to use it as a tool for Bible comparison, and soon found that it is an important new translation that one should not ignore. The HCSB is notable for a number of reasons.

First, it is a completely fresh translation of the Bible, and not a revision of a translation. Most of the translations on the market today are revisions of translations (ESV, RSV, NRSV, NKJV, NLT, REB). Even the NIV, which claims be a new translation, is greatly dependent upon the language of the RSV and KJV. The last completely "fresh" translation of the Bible was the New English Bible (1972).

Second, the HCSB, despite its independence actually harks back to the KJV in its METHOD, but not in its language. The KJV was mostly a literal translation of the Bible, but not slavishly so. The HCSB is literal where it can be, but not to the det ...
At first I ignored this new version of the Bible, but began to take notice after I acquired an electronic form of the text. I began to use it as a tool for Bible comparison, and soon found that it is an important new translation that one should not ignore. The HCSB is notable for a number of reasons.

First, it is a completely fresh translation of the Bible, and not a revision of a translation. Most of the translations on the market today are revisions of translations (ESV, RSV, NRSV, NKJV, NLT, REB). Even the NIV, which claims be a new translation, is greatly dependent upon the language of the RSV and KJV. The last completely "fresh" translation of the Bible was the New English Bible (1972).

Second, the HCSB, despite its independence actually harks back to the KJV in its METHOD, but not in its language. The KJV was mostly a literal translation of the Bible, but not slavishly so. The HCSB is literal where it can be, but not to the detriment of intelligibility. When it translates phrases in a non literal way, it is always careful not to go beyond what the text means, i.e. one will not find expansive interpretation here.

Third, the Holman tries and succeeds in making a translation into English people can understand. That does not mean "kitchen English", but good, literate English, that we use today. A good example is the word "Scribe" which is sometimes rendered in the HCSB as "a student of Scripture" (Matt 13.52).

Fourth, the HCSB took twenty years to make. It has been produced with great care, and has taken advantage of the latest computer technology, which has resulted in a version that is consistent. Many of the scholars who worked on this project were also involved in the NASB. The same dedication to accuracy and care that one finds in the NASB come through in the HCSB, although with the HCSB the approach and methodology, and hence resultant translation is different.

Fifth, the Bible is not afraid to render familiar biblical texts in a different way. For example, John 3.16 reads differently, but more accurately: "For God loved the world in this way ..." Older translations render "For God so loved ..." suggesting that the text is about the EXTENT of God's love, whereas the word HOUTOS shows not HOW MUCH, but HOW God loves. Another example, Psalm 23:3: "He leads me along the right paths for His name's sake." Here we find " right paths" instead of "in the paths of righteousness." The Hebrew is therefore more accurately rendered.