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Jewish New Testament Commentary

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A companion to the Jewish New Testament (which is available separately in the Complete Jewish Bible), the Jewish New Testament Commentary (JNTC) deals with “Jewish issues” that confront readers of the New Testament — questions Jews have about Yeshua (Jesus), the New Testament and Christianity; questions Christians have about Judaism and the Jewish roots of their faith; and questions Messianic Jews have about being both Jewish and Messianic.

Jewish New Testament Commentary
• Author: David H. Stern
• Publisher: Jewish New Testament Publications (1996)

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April 24, 2019  | 10:33 PM   |    Good (4)
A must have for Jewish study of the Apostolic Writings ("NT"). Dr. Stern provides real scholarship as a Jewish believer living in Jerusalem for many years. His knowledge of, and ability to corroborate other Jewish texts to provide context and clarity to many things in the "NT" is impressive. It seems that this work has become a standard, or rather, required reading for those interested in the original Jewish message of the apostles' writings.

The work is a verse-by-verse commentary, although there isn't content for a great many verses. I deduct one star for that alone. In book form, it is about the size of a thick Bible, which gives you an idea of the total amount of content within it.

Nevertheless, I am impressed and greatly appreciative of Dr. Stern's insights in the "Jewish New Testament Commentary," and I highly recommend it. I would, however, like to see the price lowered a bit.
February 23, 2018  | 12:09 PM   |    Good (4)
I find this very uneven. Some sections are a few sentences and add no more information than a good study bible. Other sections are fairly detailed. The gospels are fairly well covered but the pastoral letters are a bit lightweight.

There is no book introduction or summary on author or time or social/political setting or overview to help you orientate yourself as you find in a typical commentary. The commentary launches straight into the text. For example from letter 1 & 2 peter:
1Peter 1:1 Kefa is the name Yeshua gave Shim‘on Bar-Yochanan when he called him to be his talmid (Yn 1:42&N, Mt 4:18N); in most English versions it is written, “Cephas,” following the Greek transliteration of the Aramaic word. Yeshua, upon Shim‘on’s being first to acknowledge him as the Messiah, revealed the significance of the name: “You are Kefa [which means ‘Rock’], and on this rock I will build my Community, and the gates of Sh’ol will not overcome it”(Mt 16:17-18&NN). The New Testament ...
I find this very uneven. Some sections are a few sentences and add no more information than a good study bible. Other sections are fairly detailed. The gospels are fairly well covered but the pastoral letters are a bit lightweight.

There is no book introduction or summary on author or time or social/political setting or overview to help you orientate yourself as you find in a typical commentary. The commentary launches straight into the text. For example from letter 1 & 2 peter:
1Peter 1:1 Kefa is the name Yeshua gave Shim‘on Bar-Yochanan when he called him to be his talmid (Yn 1:42&N, Mt 4:18N); in most English versions it is written, “Cephas,” following the Greek transliteration of the Aramaic word. Yeshua, upon Shim‘on’s being first to acknowledge him as the Messiah, revealed the significance of the name: “You are Kefa [which means ‘Rock’], and on this rock I will build my Community, and the gates of Sh’ol will not overcome it”(Mt 16:17-18&NN). The New Testament emphasizes that significance by usually rendering the name in Greek as “Petros” (“rock”), normally transliterated “Peter” in English.

2 peter opens with
2Peter 1:1 Shim‘on bar-Yochanan and Kefa are names for Peter the emissary (apostle). See Mt 4:18, 10:2-4, 16:17-18&NN; Yn 1:42&N; 1 Ke 1:1&N.

Giving no indication if the author is the same as the first letter or where David Stern stands on the discussion. later the commentary states

2Peter 1:14-15 As our Lord Yeshua the Messiah has made clear to me. Yeshua indicated how Kefa would die at Yn 21:18-19, though without saying when. Here Kefa knows it will be soon. According to tradition, Kefa was crucified upside down, saying he did not deserve to be crucified right side up like his Lord.

In practice I find myself turning to the Jewish annotated New Testament first and then to this volume if I have time When looking at a passage in the lectionary. There are references back to torah throughout but I feel you need to use it when working through a book.

It’s certainly not the first resource i turn to but is definitely Worth having in your library for a Messianic Jewish perspective but I think of it more as a study bible rather than a commentary. But I certainly think you need to get more typical commentaries first and think of this as a secondary nice to have resource for a non traditional perspective.