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Morphology of Biblical Greek

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Category: Greek Grammars   |   Install Options: Download only

$34.90

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Formerly included in Zondervan Scholarly Bible Study Suite. Now re-released for individual purchase.

William Mounce's Morphology of Biblical Greek is a companion to his grammar which explains, in a way second-year Greek students can understand, how Greek words are formed. It shows that Greek word formation follows a limited set of rules. Once these rules are understood, it becomes clear that forms which once seemed to be irregular or an exception actually follow these morphological rules.

The Morphology of Biblical Greek has five parts:

  • The rules that determine how Greek words change.
  • The rules of verb formation, from augment to personal ending.
  • Paradigms for every type of noun and adjective form, with all the words that belong in each category and any peculiarities of a given word.
  • All the verbs and principal parts, with verbs that follow the same rules grouped together.
  • An index of all words in the New Testament with their morphological category.

The Morphology of Biblical Greek contains the most complete set of paradigms for nouns, verbs, adjectives, and pronouns available for New Testament Greek.

Morphology of Biblical Greek
• Author: William Mounce
• Publisher: Zondervan (1994)

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June 6, 2014  | 12:42 AM  |  Fantastic (5)
MBG (as it's known for short) is a great compact resource for morphological questions in the Greek NT. Any word in the testament can be looked up and some material from the LXX is also included. It's a very handy reference for unusual forms, for the reinforcement of paradigms learned, or partially learned, in first year Greek.

The “How to Use MBG” section is pretty much required reading to get full benefit from the text. After that initial section phonological elements, contractions, aspiration, deaspiration, accenting and so on follow. Then verbs, nouns and adjectives are treated in detail. Rules describing formation of cases, tenses and moods are presented, with paradigm charts for each. Lists of the words following each paradigm are then given. After that adjectives and then exhaustive lists of principle parts. Personally I am in no position to critique the scholarship of the material though I've not found myself led astray. But from the very pragmatic point of view of being ...
MBG (as it's known for short) is a great compact resource for morphological questions in the Greek NT. Any word in the testament can be looked up and some material from the LXX is also included. It's a very handy reference for unusual forms, for the reinforcement of paradigms learned, or partially learned, in first year Greek.

The “How to Use MBG” section is pretty much required reading to get full benefit from the text. After that initial section phonological elements, contractions, aspiration, deaspiration, accenting and so on follow. Then verbs, nouns and adjectives are treated in detail. Rules describing formation of cases, tenses and moods are presented, with paradigm charts for each. Lists of the words following each paradigm are then given. After that adjectives and then exhaustive lists of principle parts. Personally I am in no position to critique the scholarship of the material though I've not found myself led astray. But from the very pragmatic point of view of being able to parse what is on the page and thus know what one is reading in the Greek NT, I can attest to the volume's utility. I might also mention that I was introduced to its rule-based morphology through Mounce's own Basics of Biblical Greek, and though that might be helpful it is by no means a requirement to gain from benefit of this work.

Now, I have this in both hard copy and in Accordance. It's a work that takes some getting used to to use as a book as its organized by word categories. And the categorization is not unnaturally, by morphological pattern. As a consequence the index of words from which one finds the category to examine is crucial until one becomes familiar with the organization. In the hardcopy of course, this is a laborious process of looking up the index and then going to the relevant section.

In Accordance this process is greatly simplified by the search capabilities. Searching is possible by the following fields : Section, Titles, English Content, Scripture, Greek Content and Pages. The ability to search by page number is a great help particularly when looking up references from other print resources. But the real win is in being able to look up Greek words from lexical or inflected forms. For example highlighting δουλεύειν in the GNT28-T and then amplifying to MBG will find the δουλεύω entry. Searching for compounds such as καταφρονήσει will find note 380 which is a note to the simple form φρονέω. As the notes are all hyper linked one simply clicks on this and one is taken to the entry for φρονέω, where the morphology is available. Failing such quick approaches one can of course cut and paste the word into a Greek Content search of the tool.

Scripture reference search would likely see very little use I think. I don't use it much. Scripture references occur mainly, perhaps only, in the notes. But the scripture references are hyperlinked allowing you to quickly see the word in context in a Greek text. Like all Accordance tools, that I know of, you can set primary and alternate texts, for resolution of such links. This means that instance details can show you the scripture reference with a simple mouse over.

Of course, one benefits from all the usual Accordance tool features like being able to go forward and backward in search hits (Mk) or back in navigation to previous locations, and being able to call up previous searches and reexecute them, the ability to alter text size and display theme elements. All this in addition to simply being able to the content itself.

One final point worth noting. A number of people, myself included, like to see an electronic book containing all, where possible absolutely all, of the printed edition's material. With MBG this is almost the case. The only page I can see missing is the publication data behind the title page. Now, while this might strictly as it should be as this is a different edition, being electronic, it is perhaps unfortunate as in the print edition this page also contains a dedication, plus the usual library and editorial information and permissions. That aside though, I recommend this Accordance edition for anyone using the GNT without considerable skill in Greek, and perhaps even with it as a reference. Its many functional enhancements over the print edition, complement well an already hugely useful book.
September 13, 2012  | 10:17 AM  |  Fantastic (5)
This is a fantastic resource. Very concise, no fluff, very thorough. Please bring it back for electronic purchase!!!